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458-20-107  <<  458-20-108 >>   458-20-109

WAC 458-20-108

No agency filings affecting this section since 2003

Returned goods, allowances, cash discounts.

(1) When a contract of sale is made subject to cancellation at the option of one of the parties or to revision in the event the goods sold are defective or if the sale is made subject to cash or trade discount, the gross proceeds actually derived from the contract and the selling price are determined by the transaction as finally completed.
(2) Returned goods. When sales are made either upon approval or upon a sale or return basis, and the purchaser returns the property purchased and the entire selling price is refunded or credited to the purchaser, the seller may deduct an amount equal to the selling price from gross proceeds of sales in computing tax liability, if the amount of sales tax previously collected from the buyer has been refunded by the seller to the buyer. If the property purchased is not returned within the guaranty period as established by contract or by customs of the trade, or if the full selling price is not refunded or credited to the purchaser, a presumption is raised that the property returned is not returned goods but is an exchange or a repurchase by the vendor.
To illustrate: S sells an article for $60.00 and credits his sales account therewith. The purchaser returns the article purchased within the guaranty period and the purchase price and the sales tax theretofore paid by the buyer is refunded or credited to him. S may deduct $60.00 from the gross amount reported on his tax return.
(3) Defective goods. When bona fide refunds, credits or allowances are given within the guarantee period by a seller to a purchaser on account of defects in goods sold, the amount of such refunds, credits or allowances may be deducted by the seller in computing tax liability, if the proportionate amount of the sales tax previously collected from the buyer has been refunded by the seller.
To illustrate: S sells an article to B for $60.00 and credits his sales account therewith. The article is later found to be defective.
(a) S gives B credit of $50.00 on account of the defect, and also a credit of sales tax collectible on that amount. S may deduct $50.00 from the gross amount reported in his tax returns. This is true whether or not B retains the defective article.
(b) B returns the article to S who gives B an allowance of $50.00 on a second article of the same kind which B purchases for an additional payment of $10.00, plus sales tax thereon. S may deduct $50.00 from the gross amount reported in his tax returns. The sale of the second article, however, must be reported for tax purposes as a $60.00 sale and included in the gross amount in his tax return.
(c) B returns the article to S who replaces it with a new article of the same kind free of charge, and without sales tax. S may deduct $60.00 from the gross amount reported in his tax returns, but the $60.00 selling price of the substituted article must be reported in the gross amount.
No deduction is allowed from the gross amount reported for tax if S in (b) and (c) of this subsection, does not credit his sales account with the selling price of the new article furnished to replace the defective one, but instead merely credits the sales account with an amount equal to the additional payment received, if any. In such case, the allowance for the defect is already shown in the sales account by the reduced sales price of the new article.
(4) Motor vehicle warranties. In the 1987 session, the Washington legislature enacted a "lemon law" creating enforcement provisions for new motor vehicle warranties. A manufacturer which repurchases a new motor vehicle under warranty because of a defective condition is required to refund to the consumer the "collateral charges" which include retail sales tax. The refund shall be made to the consumer by the manufacturer or by the dealer for the manufacturer. The department will then credit or refund the amount of the tax so refunded.
Evidence. To receive a credit or refund, the manufacturer or dealer must provide evidence that the retail sales tax was collected by the dealer and that it was refunded to the consumer. Acceptable proof will be:
(a) A copy of the dealer invoice showing the sales tax was paid by the consumer; and
(b) A signed statement from the consumer acknowledging receipt of the refunded tax. The statement should include the consumer's name, the date, the amount of the tax refunded, and the name of the dealer or the manufacturer making the refund.
(5) Discounts. The selling price of a service or of an article of tangible personal property does not include the amount of bona fide discounts actually taken by the buyer and the amount of such discount may be deducted from gross proceeds of sales providing such amount has been included in the gross amount reported.
(a) Discounts are not deductible under the retail sales tax when such tax is collected upon the selling price before the discount is taken and no portion of the tax is refunded to the buyer.
(b) Discount deductions will be allowed under the extracting or manufacturing classifications only when the value of the products is determined from the gross proceeds of sales.
(c) Patronage dividends which are granted in the form of discounts in the selling price of specific articles (for example, a rebate of one cent per gallon on purchases of gasoline) are deductible. (Some types of patronage dividends are not deductible. See WAC 458-20-219.)
[Statutory Authority: RCW 82.32.300. WSR 88-01-050 (Order 87-9), § 458-20-108, filed 12/15/87; WSR 83-07-034 (Order ET 83-17), § 458-20-108, filed 3/15/83; Order ET 70-3, § 458-20-108 (Rule 108), filed 5/29/70, effective 7/1/70.]