Chapter 16-71 WAC

Last Update: 11/18/16

EQUINE DISEASES IN WASHINGTON STATE

WAC Sections

16-71-010Definitions.
16-71-015Forms used in this chapter.
EQUINE INFECTIOUS ANEMIA
16-71-022Equine infectious anemia procedures.
16-71-030EIA quarantine.
16-71-035Identification of EIA positive equine.
EQUINE VIRAL ARTERITIS (EVA)
16-71-065Equine viral arteritis.
16-71-070Adoption of USDA equine viral arteritis uniform methods and rules.
EQUINE HERPES VIRUS (EHV1)
16-71-080Equine herpes virus.
EQUINE PIROPLASMOSIS
16-71-090Equine piroplasmosis.
STRANGLES
16-71-100Strangles.
VESICULAR STOMATITIS
16-71-110Vesicular stomatitis.
DISPOSITION OF SECTIONS FORMERLY CODIFIED IN THIS TITLE
16-71-001Promulgation. [Order 1330, § 16-71-001, filed 12/21/73.] Repealed by WSR 00-14-059, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040.
16-71-002Promulgation. [Order 1354, § 16-71-002, filed 5/21/74.] Repealed by Order 1431, filed 2/10/76. Later promulgation, see WAC 16-71-003.
16-71-003Promulgation. [Order 1431, § 16-71-003, filed 2/10/76. Formerly WAC 16-71-002.] Repealed by WSR 00-14-059, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040.
16-71-020Procedure. [Order 1354, § 16-71-020, filed 5/21/74; Order 1330, § 16-71-020, filed 12/21/73.] Repealed by Order 1431, filed 2/10/76. Later promulgation, see WAC 16-71-022.
16-71-040Branding. [Order 1330, § 16-71-040, filed 12/21/73.] Repealed by WSR 00-14-059, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040.
16-71-050Penalty. [Order 1330, § 16-71-050, filed 12/21/73.] Repealed by WSR 00-14-059, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040.


16-71-010
Definitions.

"Certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI)" means a legible veterinary health inspection certificate on an official form (electronic or paper) from the state of origin or by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS). This certificate must be executed by a licensed and accredited veterinarian or a veterinarian approved by USDA APHIS. The certificate of veterinary inspection is also known as an "official health certificate."
"Department" means the Washington state department of agriculture.
"Director" means the director of the Washington state department of agriculture or his or her authorized representative.
"Equine" means horses, donkeys, mules, ponies, zebras, and others in the Equidae family.
"Herd plan" means a written management agreement between the animal owner and the state veterinarian, with possible input from a private accredited veterinarian designated by the owner and the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) veterinary services area veterinarian-in-charge, in which each participant agrees to undertake actions specified in the herd plan to control the spread of infectious, contagious, or communicable disease within and from an infected herd and to work toward eradicating the disease in the infected herd.
"Official test" means a laboratory test by USDA-approved laboratories or by people authorized by the state of origin's animal health officials to conduct the tests.
"VS form 1-27" means a United States department of agriculture permit form for the movement of restricted or quarantined livestock.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-010, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040. WSR 00-14-059, § 16-71-010, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00; Order 1330, § 16-71-010, filed 12/21/73.]



16-71-015
Forms used in this chapter.

Forms used in this chapter may be obtained from the department at:
Animal Services Division
Washington State Department of Agriculture
1111 Washington St. S.E.
Olympia, WA 98504-2560
Email: ahealth@agr.wa.gov
Phone: 360-902-1878.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. WSR 16-23-109, § 16-71-015, filed 11/18/16, effective 12/19/16. Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-015, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-022
Equine infectious anemia procedures.

(1) Equine infectious anemia (EIA) is an infection by the equine infectious anemia lentivirus that affects both sexes, all ages, all breeds, and all species of equine. Infected equine remain carriers for life, constituting a potential source for spread of the infection. There is no known cure or treatment.
(2)(a) Positive diagnosis of EIA is made with the agar gel immunodiffusion test (AGID or Coggins test), competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (cELISA test) or other official test. A supplementary AGID will be conducted to confirm positives detected with other official tests.
(b) Blood samples for EIA testing will be collected by licensed, accredited veterinarians at the owners' request and expense. At sample collection, the veterinarian will make an accurate, detailed identification of the equine on an official test request form. Positive test results are to be reported to state and federal animal health authorities.
(3) The management or board of governors at race tracks, rodeos, shows, fairs or other assembly points may require more restrictive testing for all equine before consignment to an assembly point or participation in an event.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-022, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040. WSR 00-14-059, § 16-71-022, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00; Order 1431, § 16-71-022, filed 2/10/76. Formerly WAC 16-71-020.]



16-71-030
EIA quarantine.

(1)(a) EIA positive equine will be quarantined to the location of origin or other location approved by the director, as provided for in RCW 16.36.010.
(b) The quarantine will be released only upon the positive equine's death or if the animal is legally moved from the quarantine location by permit on a VS form 1-27.
(c) All equine exposed to EIA positive equine will be quarantined. The quarantine will be removed on these exposed equine and movement allowed only after a negative, official EIA test at least ninety days after the positive equine have been removed from the quarantine premises.
(2) Positive equine must be:
(a) Placed in permanent quarantine in a restricted holding facility for the life of the equine under a herd plan developed to control the spread of the diseases, as provided for in RCW 16.36.005; or
(b) Donated to a diagnostic or research facility; or
(c) Legally removed from the state on a VS form 1-27; or
(d) Euthanized. A state or federal animal health official or a licensed and accredited veterinarian will conduct euthanasia.
(3) For lifelong quarantine, a state or federal animal health official must approve the isolation facility. The isolation facility must be located at least two hundred yards from any other equine, and must keep the positive equine separate from all other equine. The facility must be screened to prevent transmission of EIA by insect vectors.
(4) In consultation with an entomologist, an insect control program must be developed, approved by the director, and must be followed routinely.
(5) If the positive equine is donated to a research facility or removed from the state, it can only move by permit on a VS form 1-27. For removal from the state, the receiving state must agree in advance to accept the positive equine.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-030, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040. WSR 00-14-059, § 16-71-030, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00; Order 1330, § 16-71-030, filed 12/21/73.]



16-71-035
Identification of EIA positive equine.

Confirmed EIA positive equine will be permanently identified by lip tattooing or branding with a hot iron, chemical brand, or freeze brand. A lip tattoo is applied to the inside surface of the upper lip and consists of the numbers 91 followed by the letter A, with each character being at least one inch high and three-fourths of an inch wide. A brand is applied on the left side of the neck or left shoulder and consists of the numbers 91 followed by the letter A, with each character being at least two inches high. Permanent identification will be applied by state or federal animal health authorities.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-035, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040. WSR 00-14-059, § 16-71-035, filed 7/3/00, effective 8/3/00.]



16-71-065
Equine viral arteritis.

(1) Equine viral arteritis (EVA) is a contagious equine disease. Although typically not life threatening to otherwise healthy adult horses, EVA is of special concern because it can result in abortion in pregnant mares, illness and death in young foals, and establishment of the carrier state in stallions. Equine viral arteritis is a manageable disease that can be prevented through a vaccination program.
(2) If equine test positive for EVA:
(a) The owner of intact males over six months of age and equine reproductive products from donors that test positive for EVA must comply with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Equine Viral Arteritis Uniform Methods and Rules, effective April 19, 2004.
(b) Intact males that test antibody positive for EVA may be subject to quarantine.
(c) Equine semen and embryos from antibody positive donors must be used or implanted only in vaccinated or seropositive mares. These mares must be isolated for twenty-one days following insemination or implantation.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-065, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-070
Adoption of USDA equine viral arteritis uniform methods and rules.

In addition to the rules adopted in this chapter, the Washington state department of agriculture adopts the procedures and methods of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Equine Viral Arteritis Uniform Methods and Rules, effective April 19, 2004. The department maintains a copy of this document for public inspection. You may also find the information on the internet at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/animal_diseases/eva/downloads/eva-umr.pdf
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-070, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-080
Equine herpes virus.

(1) The neurological form of equine herpes virus (EHV1) is a contagious equine disease that can cause respiratory disease, neurological disease, and abortion.
(2) Horses that show clinical signs consistent with neurological EHV1 and test positive to a PCR test for neurological EHV1 will be dealt with by the state veterinarian on a case-by-case basis.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-080, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-090
Equine piroplasmosis.

(1) Equine piroplasmosis (EP) is a tick-borne disease caused by two parasitic organisms, Theileria equi and Babesia caballi, and is transmitted to horses by ticks or improperly disinfected needles or surgical instruments. EP causes clinical signs such as fever, anemia, lethargy, jaundice, dependent edema, and labored breathing.
(2) Horses that test positive to any of the following tests must either be euthanized or removed from the state within thirty days of diagnosis:
(a) cELISA (competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay);
(b) CF (complement fixation);
(c) PCR (polymerase chain reaction); or
(d) IFA (immunofluorescent antibody).
(3) Equine found positive to piroplasmosis must be:
(a) Permanently quarantined in a restricted holding facility for the life of the equine under a herd plan developed to control the spread of the disease, as provided for in RCW 16.36.005; or
(b) Donated to a diagnostic or research facility; or
(c) Legally removed from the state on a VS form 1-27; or
(d) The equine is euthanized and disposed of under the direct supervision of a state or federal animal health official.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-090, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-100
Strangles.

(1) Strangles (also known as equine distemper) is a contagious, upper respiratory tract infection of equines caused by a bacterium, Streptococcus equi var equi. Strangles is enzootic in domesticated horses worldwide.
(2) Horses that test positive to Streptococcus equi will be dealt with by the state veterinarian on a case-by-case basis.
[Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-100, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]



16-71-110
Vesicular stomatitis.

Equine that have been diagnosed with vesicular stomatitis will be held in quarantine with all exposed and susceptible species at the location where livestock were diagnosed until fourteen days following the last documented observation of new lesions in animals at that location.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 16.36.040 and chapter 34.05 RCW. WSR 16-23-109, § 16-71-110, filed 11/18/16, effective 12/19/16. Statutory Authority: Chapters 16.36 and 34.05 RCW. WSR 10-13-056, § 16-71-110, filed 6/10/10, effective 7/11/10.]