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WAC 220-450-190

Wildlife rehabilitationDisposing of wildlife remains.

(1) Wildlife carcasses (except for those that are oiled) must be incinerated, buried, or otherwise destroyed, according to local laws and regulations to avoid the risk of poisoning wildlife, a primary permittee must not allow chemically euthanized wildlife to be scavenged.
(a) Wildlife carcasses may be donated to any person or institution authorized under state or federal law to acquire and possess specific wildlife carcasses or parts.
(b) A primary permittee on a wildlife rehabilitation permit may keep the carcass of any bird, except golden eagle or bald eagle, so the feathers on the carcass are available for imping and education as long as they are in compliance with federal rules.
(c) A primary permittee must send any and all remains of a golden eagle or bald eagle, including all talons, feathers and other parts, to the National Eagle Repository following instructions from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
(d) A primary permittee may retain wildlife carcasses and skins for mounting or skin preparation for the purpose of public display and education programs. If prepared by a licensed taxidermist, the primary permittee must supply the taxidermist with written documentation that the carcass or skin is possessed pursuant to a wildlife rehabilitation permit. The taxidermist must possess the written documentation at all times while the carcass or skin is in the taxidermist's possession. The primary permittee must keep the mount at the wildlife rehabilitation facility and may use it for public display for education programs. If the wildlife carcass is a banded bird or has an implanted microchip, the band number or microchip number must be reported to the issuing agency, entity, or person.
(e) A primary permittee who retains a wildlife carcass or parts may only possess the carcass or parts so long as the primary permittee possesses a valid wildlife rehabilitation permit and complies with all applicable federal laws. If the permittee no longer has a valid wildlife rehabilitation permit, the person must have a different authorizing state or federal permit to keep the carcasses or parts, or surrender the carcasses or parts to the department.
(2) Animals that have died of or have been euthanized due to reportable diseases must be disposed of as directed by Washington department of fish and wildlife (WDFW) wildlife veterinarian. No carcasses or parts should be retained.
(3) A primary permittee must not dispose of dead oiled wildlife without obtaining department approval.
(4) A violation of this section by a permittee or subpermittee on a wildlife rehabilitation permit is punishable under RCW 77.15.750, Unlawful use of a department permit—Penalty.
(5) A violation of this section by a person who lacks a valid wildlife rehabilitation permit is punishable under RCW 77.15.120 for endangered birds; RCW 77.15.130 for protected birds; or RCW 77.15.400 for all other wild birds, depending on the bird species.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 77.04.012, 77.04.013, 77.04.020, 77.04.055, 77.12.047, 77.12.240, 77.12.467, 77.12.469, and 77.32.070. WSR 19-06-038 (Order 19-35), § 220-450-190, filed 3/1/19, effective 4/1/19. Statutory Authority: RCW 77.04.012, 77.04.013, 77.04.020, 77.04.055, and 77.12.047. WSR 17-05-112 (Order 17-04), recodified as § 220-450-190, filed 2/15/17, effective 3/18/17. Statutory Authority: RCW 77.12.047, 77.12.240, 77.12.467, 77.12.469, and 77.32.070. WSR 13-18-046 (Order 13-192), § 232-12-865, filed 8/30/13, effective 9/30/13.]
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