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WAC 458-20-145

Agency filings affecting this section

Local sales and use tax.

(1) Introduction. Effective July 1, 2008, Washington implements new rules governing how local retail sales taxes are sourced within Washington. See RCW 82.32.730 and 82.14.490. These rules govern where the local retail sales tax attributable to the sale of tangible personal property, retail services, extended warranties, and the lease of tangible personal property is sourced.
"Source," "sourced," or "sourcing" refer to the location (as in a local taxing district, jurisdiction, or authority) where a sale or lease is deemed to occur and is subject to retail sales tax. The department assigns location codes to identify the specific taxing locations that receive the local taxes. These location codes are used on tax returns to accurately identify the correct taxing location and tax rate.
Sellers and their agents are responsible for determining the appropriate tax rate for all their retail sales taxable in Washington. Sellers and their agents are also responsible for collecting from their purchasers the correct amount of tax due upon each sale and remitting that tax to the department.
Throughout this section the department provides a number of examples that identify facts and then state a conclusion. These examples should be used only as a general guide. The tax results of other situations must be determined separately after a review of all of the facts and circumstances.
This section is divided into four subsections. Subsection (1) contains this introduction, a description of department resources available to assist taxpayers in performing local sales tax sourcing, and certain key terms. Subsection (2) describes Washington's sourcing rules that become effective July 1, 2008. Subsection (3) provides information relating to the sourcing of telecommunication services. Finally, subsection (4) briefly explains Washington's use tax rule.
(a) What resources does the department offer to help sellers determine their local retail sales tax sourcing? The department offers a number of resources to assist taxpayers in sourcing retail sales. These resources include:
(i) The "Local Sales & Use Tax Flyer." This publication is updated every quarter and is mailed to select taxpayers reporting on paper returns. It is also available online on the department's web site at www.dor.wa.gov under "get a form or publication." It provides a listing of all local taxing jurisdictions, location codes, and their corresponding tax rates.
(ii) The online sales and use tax rate look up application (GIS). This is an online application that provides current and past sales and use tax rates and location codes based on an address or a selected location on a map. It also allows users to download data that they can incorporate into their own systems to retrieve the proper tax rate for a specific address.
(iii) Taxing jurisdiction maps. The department has a selection of maps of various taxing jurisdictions that identify the boundaries of a specific taxing jurisdiction.
(b) Of what key terms should I be aware when reading this section?
(i) "Receipt" and "receive" mean taking possession of tangible personal property and making first use of services. "Receive" and "receipt" do not include possession by a shipping company on behalf of the purchaser. See RCW 82.32.730 (8)(d).
(ii) "Retail sale" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 82.04.050 and includes the following three types of retail sales: Sales and leases of tangible personal property; sales of retail services; and sales of extended warranties.
(iii) "Retail service" means those services described in RCW 82.04.050 as retail sales. This definition includes retail sales of labor and services rendered with respect to tangible personal property.
The following is a nonexclusive list of retail services, many of which are addressed in detail in other rules adopted by the department:
• Constructing, remodeling, or painting buildings (e.g., see WAC 458-20-170);
• Land clearing and earth moving (e.g., see WAC 458-20-172);
• Landscape maintenance and horticultural services (e.g., see WAC 458-20-226);
• Repairing or cleaning equipment (e.g., see WAC 458-20-173);
• Lodging provided by hotels and motels (e.g., see WAC 458-20-166);
• Amusement and recreation services such as golf, bowling, swimming, and tennis (e.g., see WAC 458-20-183);
• Physical fitness services such as exercise classes, personal trainer services, and the use of exercise equipment (e.g., see WAC 458-20-183); and
• Abstract, title insurance, or escrow services (e.g., see WAC 458-20-156).
(iv) "Tangible personal property" means property that can be seen, weighed, measured, felt, or touched, or that is in any other manner perceptible to the senses and includes prewritten software. See RCW 82.08.010(7), 82.08.950, and 82.12.950 for more information.
(v) "Extended warranty" is an agreement for a specified duration to perform the replacement or repair of tangible personal property at no additional charge or a reduced charge for tangible personal property, labor, or both, or to provide indemnification for the replacement or repair of tangible personal property, based on the occurrence of specified events. The term "extended warranty" does not include an agreement, otherwise meeting the definition of extended warranty in this subsection, if no separate charge is made for the agreement and the value of the agreement is included in the sales price of the tangible personal property covered by the agreement. See RCW 82.04.050(7).
(vi) "Motor vehicle" generally means every vehicle that is self-propelled and every vehicle that is propelled by electric power obtained from overhead trolley wires, but not operated upon rails. Motor vehicles are vehicles capable of being moved upon public ways. "Motor vehicle" includes a neighborhood electric vehicle as defined in RCW 46.04.357. "Motor vehicle" includes a medium-speed electric vehicle as defined in RCW 46.04.295. An electric personal assistive mobility device is not considered a motor vehicle. A power wheelchair is not considered a motor vehicle. For more information see RCW 46.04.320 "Motor vehicle" and RCW 46.04.670 "Vehicle."
(vii) "Primary property location" is the property's physical address as provided by the lessee and kept in the lessor's records maintained in the ordinary course of business, provided use of this address does not constitute bad faith. The primary property location will not change merely by intermittent use of the leased property in different local jurisdictions, e.g., use of leased business property on business trips or service calls to multiple jurisdictions.
(viii) "Transportation equipment" refers to:
(A) Locomotives and railcars used to carry people or property in interstate commerce; and
(B) Trucks and truck tractors with gross vehicle weight ratings of 10,000 pounds or greater, trailers, and semi-trailers, or passenger buses registered through an international registration plan and operated under authority of a carrier authorized and certificated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (or other federal authority) to engage in carrying people or property in interstate commerce (International Registration Plan is a reciprocity agreement among states of the United States and provinces of Canada providing for payment of license fees on the basis of total distance operated in all jurisdictions); and
(C) Aircraft operated by air carriers authorized and certificated by the U.S. Department of Transportation (or other federal or foreign authority) to carry people or property by air in interstate or foreign commerce; and
(D) Containers designed for use on and component parts attached or secured on the items described in (b)(viii)(A) through (C) of this subsection (1). RCW 82.32.730 (8)(e).
(2) Local retail sales tax sourcing. This subsection describes Washington's retail sales tax sourcing rules. Subsection (2)(a) of this section lists the general sourcing rules applicable to the sale of tangible personal property, retail services, and extended warranties. Subsection (2)(b) of this section provides special sourcing rules related to certain "florist sales" and the sale of watercraft; mobile, modular, and manufactured homes; and motor vehicles, trailers, semi-trailers, and aircraft that do not qualify as transportation equipment. Subsection (2)(c) of this section addresses the sourcing rules applicable to leases of tangible personal property.
(a) Sales of tangible personal property, retail services, and extended warranties. This subsection describes the sourcing rules applicable to the sale of tangible personal property, retail services, and extended warranties.
These rules apply in a descending order of priority. This means that the seller first should determine if (a)(i) of this subsection (Rule 1 below) applies. If it does apply, then the seller must source the sale under Rule 1. If Rule 1 does not apply, then the seller must source the sale to the location required under sourcing Rule 2 (below), and so forth until the applicable sourcing rule is determined.
If the seller ships or delivers tangible personal property to a customer who receives that property outside Washington, the sale is deemed to have taken place outside Washington and is not subject to Washington state or local retail sales tax.
The following rules apply when sourcing retail sales in Washington:
(i) Rule 1: Seller's business location. If a purchaser receives tangible personal property, a retail service, or an extended warranty at the seller's business location, the sale is sourced to that business location.
In the case of retail services, this sourcing rule will generally apply where a purchaser receives retail services at the seller's place of business, e.g., an auto repair shop, a hotel or motel, a health club providing physical fitness services, an auto parking service, a dry-cleaning service, and a storage garage. While these types of retail services are usually received at the seller's place of business, if services are received at a location other than the seller's place of business, then alternate sourcing rules will apply.
(A) Examples: Rule 1 - Tangible Personal Property.
(1) Bill, a Tacoma resident, travels to Renton and purchases a ring from a jeweler located in Renton. Bill receives the ring at the Renton location. The seller must source the sale to the Renton location.
(2) Mary, a Walla Walla resident, buys a prewritten software program from a store located in Cheney. Mary receives a compact disc containing the software at the Cheney location. The seller must source the sale to the Cheney location.
(3) Trains, Inc., an Auburn business, buys a locomotive that qualifies as transportation equipment. Trains, Inc. receives the locomotive in Fife at the seller's place of business. The seller must source the sale to the Fife location.
(B) Examples: Rule 1 - Retail Services.
(1) Barbara, a Longview resident, takes her car to a mechanic shop located in Centralia. The mechanic services the car at the Centralia location. Several days later Barbara picks up the car from the Centralia location. The services are received in Centralia. The mechanic must source the sale to the Centralia location.
(2) Rex, a Seattle resident, drops off a roll of film at a photo developer located in Bellevue. Rex picks up the developed film from the Bellevue location. The services are received in Bellevue. The developer must source the sale to the Bellevue location.
(3) Bob, a Pasco resident, takes shirts to a drycleaner located in Kennewick. The drycleaner cleans and presses the shirts. Bob then picks up the shirts in Kennewick the following week. The services are received in Kennewick. The seller must source the sale to the Kennewick location.
(C) Example: Rule 1 - Extended Warranties.
(1) Saffron, a Des Moines resident, buys a computer from a Burien computer outlet. When purchasing the computer Saffron also purchases and receives a five-year extended warranty for the computer at the Burien outlet. The seller must source the sale of the extended warranty and computer to the Burien location.
(ii) Rule 2: Tangible personal property, retail services, or extended warranties received at a location other than the seller's place of business. If the purchaser receives tangible personal property, retail services, or an extended warranty at a location other than the seller's place of business (and sourcing Rule 1 therefore does not apply), then the sale must be sourced to the location where the purchaser, or the purchaser's donee (e.g., a gift), receives such property, retail service, or extended warranty. This location can be a location indicated in instructions, known to the seller, for delivery to the purchaser or donee.
Construction contractors, painters, plumbers, carpet layers (retailers who install what they sell), earth movers, and house wreckers are the types of retail service providers that typically will source sales under this sourcing Rule 2 (presuming they provide their services at a location other than their place of business).
(A) Examples: Rule 2 - Tangible Personal Property.
(1) Wade, a Seattle resident, buys furniture from a store located in Everett. Wade has the furniture delivered to his Seattle residence. Wade receives the furniture at his location in Seattle. The seller must source the sale to Wade's Seattle residence.
(2) Joanne, a Port Angeles business owner, purchases a prewritten software program online from a store located in Sequim. Joanne receives the software at her home address in Port Angeles. The seller has information identifying the location where the software is electronically received by Joanne in Port Angeles. The seller must source the sale to Joanne's Port Angeles home location.
(3) Jean, a Tumwater resident, buys prewritten software to detect online security threats. The seller is a store located in Bothell. As part of the purchase price, Jean receives prewritten software updates. All software is electronically delivered. The seller does not know where the software is electronically delivered. However, the purchase order discloses a ship-to address where the software will be received in Tumwater. The seller must source the sale to Jean's ship-to address as this address represents a delivery location indicated in instructions for delivery to Jean. The seller must source the sale to the Tumwater location according to the ship-to address.
(4) Karl, a Spokane Valley resident, buys a mattress at a store in Spokane. The merchant delivers the mattress from its warehouse located in Deer Park to Karl's home in Spokane Valley. Karl receives the mattress at his home location in Spokane Valley. The seller must source the sale to the Spokane Valley home location.
(5) George, an Olympia resident, orders a pizza from a restaurant located in Tumwater. The restaurant obtains George's Olympia address when taking the order. George receives the pizza at the Olympia address. The seller must source the sale to Olympia according to George's Olympia address.
(6) Gunther, a Sumner resident, places an order for towels with a catalog mail order outlet located in Tacoma. The seller delivers the towels to Gunther's home at a Sumner location from a warehouse in Fife. Gunther receives the towels at the Sumner location. The seller must source the sale to Gunther's Sumner home location.
(B) Examples: Rule 2 - Retail Services.
(1) Brett, a Tacoma resident, contracts with an Olympia painting firm to have his house repainted. The Olympia firm sends employees to Brett's home in Tacoma where they perform the painting. Brett receives the painting services at his home in Tacoma. The painting firm must source the sale of painting services to Brett's Tacoma home location.
(2) Julie, an Aberdeen resident, hires a construction contractor to build a new business facility in Kelso. Julie receives the construction services at the Kelso location. The contractor must source the services to the Kelso construction location.
(3) Gabe, a Shoreline resident, sends a clock to a repair business located in Auburn. The business repairs the clock and then delivers the clock to Gabe's home in Shoreline. Gabe receives the services at the Shoreline location. The repair service must source the sale to Gabe's Shoreline home location.
(C) Example: Rule 2 - Extended Warranties.
(1) Tara, a Chelan resident, buys a computer over the internet. The retailer offers a five year extended warranty. Tara decides to purchase the extended warranty and sends the seller the appropriate paperwork. The seller then sends the extended warranty documents to Tara's home in Chelan. The sale of the extended warranty is sourced to the Chelan home location where Tara receives the warranty documents.
(D) Additional Examples: Rule 2 - Delivery Outside Washington, Gifts, and Receipt by a Shipping Company.
(1) Alan, a Spokane resident, buys a mattress at a store in Spokane. The merchant delivers the mattress from its warehouse located in Deer Park to Alan's vacation home in Idaho. The mattress was received outside of Washington and is not subject to Washington state and local sales tax. The seller does not source the sale to Washington.
(2) Sandra, a Vancouver, Washington resident, buys a computer online from a merchant in Seattle. The computer is a gift for Tim, a student attending college in Pullman. The purchaser directs the seller to ship the computer to Tim's home address in Pullman. Tim receives the computer at the Pullman location. The merchant will source the sale based on the ship-to address in Pullman.
(3) Martha, a Wenatchee resident, travels to a gift shop in Leavenworth. Martha buys five (5) items for herself and five (5) gifts for friends. Martha takes possession of the five (5) items for herself at the gift shop. Martha then has the gift shop deliver the five (5) gifts to addresses located in Wenatchee. The seller will source the sale of the five (5) items purchased by Martha for herself to Leavenworth. The seller must source the five (5) gifts to Wenatchee according to the ship-to address where each donee receives its gift.
(4) Sheila, a Yakima resident, buys equipment from a Pasco retailer. Sheila arranges to have a shipping company pick up the equipment and deliver that equipment to Sheila in Yakima. In the purchase order Sheila notifies the seller that the equipment will be received at a ship-to address in Yakima. Tangible personal property is not considered received at the seller's place of business in cases where the purchaser arranges to have the goods picked up by a shipping company on its behalf. The seller must source this sale to Sheila's ship-to Yakima location where the equipment is received.
(iii) Rule 3: Purchaser's address maintained in the seller's ordinary business records. If neither sourcing Rule 1 nor Rule 2 apply, a retail sale is sourced to the purchaser's address as indicated in the seller's records maintained in the ordinary course of the seller's business, provided use of this address does not constitute bad faith.
Example - Rule 3.
(1) Shannon buys prewritten software from a Bellevue seller by downloading the software from the seller's web site. Shannon's location is unknown at the time of sale. However, the seller maintains a Seabeck address for Shannon in its business records. Because Shannon does not receive the software at the seller's place of business and the location of receipt is unknown, sourcing Rules 1 and 2 do not apply. The seller must source the sale to the address maintained in its ordinary business records for Shannon (the Seabeck address).
(iv) Rule 4: Purchaser's address obtained at the consummation of sale. If any of sourcing Rules 1 through 3 do not apply, the sale is sourced to the purchaser's address obtained during the consummation of sale. If no other address is available, this address may be the address included on the purchaser's payment instrument (e.g., check, credit card, or money order), provided use of this address does not constitute bad faith.
Example - Rule 4.
(1) Eric buys prewritten software over the internet from a retail outlet located on Vashon Island. The seller transmits the prewritten software to an e-mail address designated by Eric. The e-mail address does not disclose Eric's location. Eric pays for the software by credit card. When entering the relevant credit card information, Eric discloses a residential address in Port Angeles to which the credit card is billed. Sourcing Rules 1 and 2 do not apply because Eric does not receive the software at the seller's business location and the seller does not know where the software is being received. Sourcing Rule 3 does not apply because the retail outlet does not have Eric's address on file in its ordinary business records. Therefore, the retail outlet must source the sale to the address related to the customer's credit card information given during the consummation of the sale. The retail outlet must source the sale to Eric's Port Angeles location.
(v) Rule 5: Origin sourcing default rule. If a seller is unable to source a sale under any of the sourcing Rules 1 through 4 above, or the seller has insufficient information to apply those rules, the default origin sourcing rule applies. Subsection (2)(b)(v)(A) through (C) of this section describes sourcing Rule 5 as it applies to the sale of tangible personal property, retail services, and extended warranties.
(A) Origin sourcing: Tangible personal property. If any of sourcing Rules 1 through 4 do not apply, the seller must source sales of tangible personal property to the address from which the property was shipped.
(B) Origin sourcing: Electronically delivered prewritten software. If any of the sourcing Rules 1 through 4 do not apply, the seller must source sales of electronically delivered prewritten computer software to the address location from which the computer software was first available for transmission by the seller. Locations that merely provide for the transfer of computer software are not address locations from which the computer software is first available for transmission.
(C) Origin sourcing: Retail services and extended warranties. If any of sourcing Rules 1 through 4 do not apply, the seller must source retail services and extended warranties to the address from which it provides the service or warranty.
(D) Examples: Rule 5 - Prewritten Software.
(1) Rebecca purchases prewritten computer software electronically and requests that the software be delivered to a specified e-mail address. The seller operates from a retail store located in Tacoma. The seller does not know the location where the software will be received and further does not have information about Rebecca's location in its ordinary business records. Additionally, Rebecca does not supply the seller with address information during the consummation of the sale. Thus, none of sourcing Rules 1 through 4 apply. This sale must be sourced under the default sourcing rule. The seller first made the prewritten software available for transmission at its Tacoma location. The seller will source the sale to that Tacoma location from which the prewritten software was first available for transmission. This result will not change if the software is routed from a Tacoma server through a second server (either operated by the seller or some third party) located outside of the Tacoma location. Routing as used in this context refers to the transfer of prewritten software from one location to another location for retransmission to a final destination, and does not include transfers to another location where additional services or products may be added.
(2) Assume the facts in Example (1) directly above, except that Rebecca's order is submitted to the Tacoma location and the prewritten software is first available for transmission from a Bellevue location. The seller will source the sale to the Bellevue location.
(b) Special sourcing rule: Florist sales and sales of watercraft; modular, mobile, and manufactured homes; and motor vehicles, trailers, semi-trailers, and aircraft that do not qualify as transportation equipment. If you are a "florist" making sales or you are making a retail sale of watercraft; modular, mobile, or manufactured homes; or motor vehicles, trailers, semi-trailers, and aircraft that do not qualify as transportation equipment (excluding leases and rentals), you must source the sale to the location at or from which delivery is made. For specific information concerning "florist sales," who qualifies as a "florist," and the related sourcing rules see RCW 82.32.730 (6)(d) and (8)(c) as amended by Senate Bill No. 6799, chapter 324, Laws of 2008.
When the sale of goods is delivered into Washington from a point outside the state and a local in-state facility, office, outlet, agent or other representative (even though not formally characterized as a "salesperson") of the seller participates in the transaction in some way, such as by taking the order, then the location of the local facility, etc., will determine the place of sale for purposes of the local sales tax. However, if the seller, the seller's agent or the seller's representative maintains no local in-state facility, office, outlet or residence from which business in some manner is conducted, the local tax must be determined by the location of the customer.
Example: Special Sourcing Rule.
(1) Ben, a Federal Way purchaser, buys a car from a dealer in Fife. The customer has the option of picking up the car on the lot in Fife or having it delivered to his residential address in Federal Way. Ben asks to have the car delivered to the Federal Way location. The dealer must source the sale of the car to the dealer's location in Fife from which the car was delivered.
(c) Leases of tangible personal property. "Lease" and "rental" mean any transfer of possession or control of tangible personal property for a fixed or indeterminate term for consideration. For more information concerning "leases" and "rentals" see RCW 82.04.040. The terms "lease" and "rental" are used interchangeably throughout this subsection (2)(c). This subsection (2)(c) provides local retail sales tax sourcing guidance for lessors who lease tangible personal property.
(i) How do I source lease payments attributable to the lease of transportation equipment? If you are leasing transportation equipment, you must source the lease payments attributable to that transportation equipment under sourcing Rules 1 through 5 above as a retail sale. See subsection (1)(b)(viii) of this section for a description of transportation equipment.
(ii) How should I source lease payments attributable to the lease of motor vehicles, trailers, semi-trailers, and aircraft that do not qualify as transportation equipment? If you are leasing a motor vehicle, trailer, semi-trailer, or aircraft that does not qualify as transportation equipment, you must source the lease payments under this subsection (2)(c)(ii).
(A) Leases that require recurring periodic payments. If the lease requires recurring periodic payments, you must source each periodic payment to the primary property location of the leased property. See subsection (1)(b)(vii) of this section for a description of primary property location. The primary property location will not change by intermittent use of the leased property in different jurisdictions, e.g., use of leased business property on business trips or service calls to multiple local jurisdictions.
(B) Leases that do not require recurring periodic payments. If the lease does not require recurring periodic payments, you must source the single lease payment under sourcing Rules 1 through 5 above as a retail sale.
(C) Examples:
(1) Rich, a Fall City customer, leases a car from a dealer in Duvall. Rich leases the car for a period of one year. The car does not qualify as transportation equipment. Rich provides the dealer with his residential address in Fall City where he keeps the car. Rich makes monthly periodic payments throughout the term of the lease. Rich indicates the primary property location for the car is his residence in Fall City. The Fall City location is recorded in the store's business records. The periodic lease payments will be sourced to the residential primary property location in Fall City. If Rich were to move to Seattle during the term of the lease and notify the dealer of a change in the car's primary property location, the dealer would source any lease payments subsequent to that change in primary property location to Seattle.
(2) Amanda, a Tacoma business owner, rents a trailer for a period of one week and no periodic payments are required under the lease. The trailer does not qualify as transportation equipment. Amanda receives the trailer at a business location in Tacoma. The seller will source the sale to the Tacoma business location.
(iii) How do I source lease payments for all other tangible personal property? If you lease tangible personal property not described in subsection (2)(c)(i) or (ii) of this section, you must source your lease payments under this subsection (2)(c)(iii).
(A) Lease that requires recurring periodic payments. If the lease requires recurring periodic payments, you must source the first periodic payment on that lease under sourcing Rules 1 through 5 as a retail sale. You must then source all subsequent periodic payments to the primary property location for each period covered by such periodic payments. See subsection (1)(b)(vii) of this section for a description of primary property location. The primary property location will not change by intermittent use of the leased property in different local jurisdictions, e.g., use of leased business property on business trips or service calls to multiple local jurisdictions.
(B) Leases that do not require recurring periodic payments. If the lease does not require recurring periodic payments, you must source the single payment under sourcing Rules 1 through 5 as a retail sale.
(C) Examples:
(1) Mark, a Gig Harbor resident, leases furniture from a store in Bremerton. The furniture will be leased for twelve months. The store delivers the furniture to Mark's home address in Gig Harbor. Mark indicates the primary property location for the equipment is his home address in Gig Harbor. The Gig Harbor location is recorded in the store's business records. The customer makes monthly periodic payments for the term of the lease. The first periodic payment must be sourced to Gig Harbor where Mark receives the furniture. The store must then source all subsequent periodic payments to Gig Harbor, which represents the primary property location recorded in the store's ordinary business records.
(2) Brad, a Pasco business owner, leases furniture from a store in Spokane. Brad picks up the furniture in Spokane and makes the initial periodic payment on the lease. The furniture is leased for a period of twelve months. Brad indicates the primary property location for the equipment is a business address in Pasco. The Pasco location is recorded in the store's business records. Brad then makes monthly periodic payments for the term of the lease. The first periodic payment must be sourced to Spokane where Brad received the furniture. The store must source the subsequent periodic payments to the Pasco primary property location.
(3) Alison, a Seattle business owner, leases equipment from a store in Issaquah. Alison picks up the equipment in Issaquah and makes an initial periodic payment on the lease. The equipment is used in work primarily performed in Washington, but the equipment is also taken out intermittently on a number of service calls made in Oregon. Alison indicates the primary property location for the equipment is a business address in Seattle. The Seattle location is recorded in the store's business records. The equipment is leased for a period of one year. Alison makes monthly periodic payments for the term of the lease. The first periodic payment must be sourced to Issaquah where the equipment is received. The store must source the subsequent periodic payments to Seattle, which represents the primary property location. Alison's intermittent use of the equipment in other jurisdictions does not change the primary property location of the equipment.
(4) Amelia, a Pasco business owner, leases equipment from a store located in Pasco. Amelia picks up the equipment in Pasco, making an initial periodic payment on the lease. The lease is for a period of one year. During the first six months of the lease, Amelia indicates the primary property location for the equipment is a business address in Walla Walla. For the second six months of the lease, Amelia indicates the primary property location is a business address in Leavenworth. The store records the primary property locations in its business records. The store must source the initial periodic payment to Pasco where Amelia received the equipment. The store must source all other periodic lease payments covering the first six months of the lease to the primary property location recorded for Walla Walla. The store must source those periodic lease payments covering the last six months of the lease to the primary property location in Leavenworth.
(5) Brian, a North Bend business owner, rents a backhoe from Construction Rentals located in Lynnwood. The lease period is 45 days and the lease requires a single lease payment. Brian pays the entire lease amount at the time of pickup. The customer picks up the equipment in Lynnwood and takes it to a job site in DuPont. Construction Rentals must source the sale to the location in Lynnwood where Brian receives the backhoe.
(6) Lisa, an Olympia business owner, rents a pressure washer from Rental Co. located in Lacey. The rental period is one day and no periodic payments are required under the lease. Lisa picks up the equipment in Lacey and takes it to a job site in Yelm. Sales tax is sourced to the seller's location in Lacey. If Rental Co. delivered the pressure washer directly to Lisa at the job site in Yelm, the sale would have been sourced to the location of the job site in Yelm.
(3) Telecommunications services.
Where can I find information related to the sourcing and sale of telecommunication services? Sales of telecommunication services and ancillary services are defined as retail sales in RCW 82.04.050. Sellers must source these services under the sourcing provisions located in RCW 82.32.520. See RCW 82.04.065 for more information about telecommunication services and ancillary services.
(4) Use tax. How is use tax sourced in Washington? Where a seller does not have an obligation to collect Washington sales tax, the tangible personal property or service sold by that person may be subject to use tax under chapter 82.12 RCW et seq. This use tax is sourced to the place of first use and is payable by the purchaser. The seller may be required to collect use tax pursuant to the requirements of RCW 82.12.040.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 82.32.300 and 82.01.060(2). WSR 08-12-035, § 458-20-145, filed 5/30/08, effective 6/30/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 82.32.300. WSR 83-07-032 (Order ET 83-15), § 458-20-145, filed 3/15/83; Order ET 75-1, § 458-20-145, filed 5/2/75; Order ET 70-3, § 458-20-145 (Rule 145), filed 5/29/70, effective 7/1/70.]