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Chapter 296-800 WAC

Last Update: 3/18/14

SAFETY AND HEALTH CORE RULES

WAC Sections

Introduction.
EMPLOYER RESPONSIBILITIES: SAFE WORKPLACE
Employer responsibilities: Safe workplaceSummary.
Provide a workplace free from recognized hazards.
Provide and use means to make your workplace safe.
Prohibit employees from entering, or being in, any workplace that is not safe.
Construct your workplace so it is safe.
Prohibit alcohol and narcotics from your workplace.
Prohibit employees from using tools and equipment that are not safe.
Establish, supervise, and enforce rules that lead to a safe and healthy work environment that are effective in practice.
Control chemical agents.
Protect employees from biological agents.
EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES
Rule.
Employee responsibilities.
SAFETY COMMITTEES AND SAFETY MEETINGS
Safety committees/safety meetingsSummary.
Establish and conduct safety committees.
Follow these rules to conduct safety meetings.
ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROGRAM
Accident prevention program.
Develop a formal, written accident prevention program.
Develop, supervise, implement, and enforce safety and health training programs that are effective in practice.
Make sure your accident prevention program is effective in practice.
FIRST-AID SUMMARY
Rule summary.
Make sure that first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.
Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.
Make sure emergency washing facilities are functional and readily accessible.
Inspect and activate your emergency washing facilities.
Make sure supplemental flushing equipment provides sufficient water.
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)
Summary.
Compliance duties owed to each employee.
Do a hazard assessment for PPE.
Document your hazard assessment for PPE.
Select appropriate PPE for your employees.
Provide PPE to your employees.
Train your employees to use PPE.
Retrain employees to use PPE, if necessary.
Document PPE training.
Require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job.
Keep PPE in safe and good condition.
Make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate head protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate foot protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate hand protection.
Make sure your employees are protected from drowning.
EMPLOYERCHEMICAL HAZARD COMMUNICATION INTRODUCTION
Employer chemical hazard communicationIntroduction.
Develop, implement, maintain, and make available a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
Include multiemployer workplaces in your program if necessary.
Identify and list all the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace.
Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used.
Make sure material safety data sheets (MSDSs) are readily accessible to your employees and NIOSH.
Label containers holding hazardous chemicals.
Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace.
Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals.
Follow these rules for handling chemicals in factory-sealed containers.
Translate certain chemical hazard communication documents upon request.
Attempt to obtain a material safety data sheet (MSDS) upon request.
Items or chemicals exempt from the rule, and exemptions from labeling.
Material safety data sheets (MSDSs) as exposure records.
Preserve exposure records for at least 30 years.
Inform current employees of exposure records.
Provide access to exposure records.
Transfer records when ceasing to do business.
SAFETY BULLETIN BOARD
Summary/rule.
Provide a safety bulletin board in your workplace.
WISHA POSTER
WISHA poster.
Post and keep a WISHA poster in your workplace.
LIGHTING
Lighting.
Provide and maintain adequate lighting.
HOUSEKEEPING, DRAINAGE, AND STORAGE
Housekeeping, drainage, and storageSummary.
HOUSEKEEPING
Keep your workplace clean.
Sweep and clean your workplace to minimize dust.
Keep your workplace free of obstacles that interfere with cleaning.
Control pests in your workplace.
Make sure floors are maintained in a safe condition.
DRAINAGE
Keep your workroom floors dry, when practical.
Provide proper drainage.
STORAGE AREAS
Store things safely.
Control vegetation in your storage areas.
SANITATION AND HYGIENE FACILITIES AND PROCEDURES
Summary.
DRINKING WATER
Provide safe drinking (potable) water in your workplace.
Clearly mark the water outlets that are not fit for drinking (nonpotable).
Make sure that systems delivering not-fit-for-drinking (nonpotable) water prevent backflow into drinking water systems.
BATHROOMS AND WASHING FACILITIES
Provide bathrooms for your employees.
Provide convenient and clean washing facilities.
EATING AREAS AND FOOD SERVICE
Make sure eating areas are safe and healthy.
Follow these requirements if you provide food service to your employees.
GARBAGE AND WASTE DISPOSAL
Dispose of garbage and waste safely.
Remove garbage and waste in a way that does not create a health hazard.
LUNCHROOMS AND PERSONAL SERVICE ROOMS
Provide a separate lunchroom if employees are exposed to toxic substances if they are allowed to eat and drink on the job site.
Provide showers when required for employees working with chemicals.
Provide change rooms when required.
Make sure any work clothes you provide are dry.
ENVIRONMENTAL TOBACCO SMOKE IN THE OFFICE
Summary.
Prohibit tobacco smoke in your office work environment.
STAIRS AND STAIR RAILINGS
SUMMARY
Summary.
Provide fixed stairs where required.
Provide stairs that minimize hazards.
Provide handrails and stair railings.
FLOOR OPENINGS, FLOOR HOLES AND OPEN-SIDED FLOORS
Summary.
Guard or cover floor openings and floor holes.
Protect open-sided floors and platforms.
WORKPLACE STRUCTURAL INTEGRITY
Summary.
Do not overload floors or roofs.
Make sure that floors are safe.
Make sure floors can support equipment that moves or has motion.
Post approved load limits (weight limits) for floors.
BASIC ELECTRICAL RULES
Basic electrical rules.
Inspect all electrical equipment your employees use to make sure the equipment is safe.
Make sure all electrical equipment is used for its approved or listed purpose.
Make sure electrical equipment used or located in wet or damp locations is designed for such use.
Make sure electrical equipment that is not marked is not used.
Identify disconnecting means.
Maintain electrical fittings, boxes, cabinets and outlets in good condition.
Working space around electrical equipment.
Maintain all flexible cords and cables in good condition and use safely.
Guard electrical equipment to prevent your employees from electrical hazards.
Make sure electrical equipment is effectively grounded.
Make sure electrical equipment has overcurrent protection.
PORTABLE FIRE EXTINGUISHERS
SummaryPortable fire extinguishers.
Provide portable fire extinguishers in your workplace.
Select and distribute portable fire extinguishers in your workplace.
Make sure that portable fire extinguishers are kept fully charged, in operable condition, and left in their designated places.
Inspect and test all portable fire extinguishers.
Train your employees to use portable fire extinguishers.
EXIT ROUTES AND EMPLOYEE ALARM SYSTEMS
Summary.
EXIT ROUTES
Provide an adequate number of exit routes.
Make sure that exit routes are large enough.
Make sure that exit routes meet their specific design and construction requirements.
Make sure that each exit route leads outside.
Provide unobstructed access to exit routes.
Exit doors must be readily opened from the inside.
Use side-hinged doors to connect rooms to exit routes.
Provide outdoor exit routes that meet these requirements.
Minimize danger to employees while they are using emergency exit routes.
Mark exits adequately.
Provide adequate lighting for exit routes and signs.
Maintain the fire retardant properties of paints or other coatings.
Maintain emergency safeguards.
Maintain exit routes during construction and repair.
Provide doors in freezer or refrigerated rooms that open from the inside.
Install and maintain an appropriate employee alarm system.
Establish procedures for sounding emergency alarms.
Test the employee alarm system.
ACCIDENT REPORTING AND INVESTIGATING
Summary.
Report the death, probable death of any employee, or the in-patient hospitalization of any employee within 8 hours.
Make sure that any equipment involved in an accident is not moved.
Assign people to assist the department of labor and industries.
Conduct a preliminary investigation for all serious injuries.
Document the preliminary investigation findings.
RELEASING ACCIDENT INVESTIGATION REPORTS
Releasing accident investigation reports.
PROTECTING THE IDENTITY OF THE SOURCE OF CONFIDENTIAL INFORMATION
Protecting the identity of the source of confidential information.
USING STANDARDS FROM NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND FEDERAL AGENCIES
Rule.
Comply with standards national organizations or of federal agencies when referenced in WISHA rules.
Definitions.
DISPOSITION OF SECTIONS FORMERLY CODIFIED IN THIS CHAPTER
296-800-13005
Establish a safety committee or have safety meetings. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-13005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-13005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 02-16-047, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050.
296-800-13010
Make sure that each meeting includes a discussion of established safety topics. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-13010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-13010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 02-16-047, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050.
296-800-13015
Make sure that safety committee meeting minutes are recorded and preserved. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-13015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 02-16-047, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050.
296-800-15010
Make sure first-aid training contains required subjects. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-15010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-15010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 04-07-160, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060.
296-800-15015
Document your first-aid training. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-15015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 04-07-160, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060.
296-800-15025
Provide a first-aid station when required. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-15025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 04-07-160, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060.
296-800-23030
Keep containers used for garbage or waste in a sanitary condition. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 03-18-090, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see WAC 296-800-23050.
296-800-23035
Remove garbage and waste in a way that does not create a health hazard. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 03-18-090, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see WAC 296-800-23055.
296-800-24010
Control tobacco smoke that comes in from the outside. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-24010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-24010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-22-023, filed 10/24/06, effective 12/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060.
296-800-290
Summary. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-290, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29005
Inspect your portable metal ladders periodically. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29010
Make sure your portable metal ladders are kept in good condition. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29015
Use your portable metal ladders safely. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-29015, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29020
Inspect your portable wooden ladders frequently. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29025
Make sure your portable wooden ladders are kept in a good condition. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-29025, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29030
Use your portable wooden ladders safely and for their intended purpose. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-29030, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29035
Safely use a portable wooden ladder when working more than 25 feet above ground. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-29040
Use wooden stepladders safely. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-29040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 05-20-068, filed 10/4/05, effective 1/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-876 WAC.
296-800-350
Introduction. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-350, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-350, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-350, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35002
Types of workplace inspections. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35002, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35004
Scheduling inspections. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35004, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35006
Inspection techniques. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35006, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35008
Response to complaints submitted by employees or their representatives. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35008, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35010
Citations mailed after an inspection. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35012
Employees (or their representatives) can request a citation and notice. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35012, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35012, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35016
Posting a citation and notice and employee complaint information. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35016, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35018
Reasons to assess civil penalties. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35018, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35020
Minimum penalties. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35022
Base penalty calculationsSeverity and probability. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35022, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35024
Severity rate determination. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35024, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35026
Probability rate determination. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35026, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35026, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35028
Determining the gravity of a violation. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35028, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35030
Base penalty adjustments. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-35030, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35030, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35032
Types of base penalty adjustments. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35032, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35038
Minimum and maximum adjusted base penalty amounts. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-35038, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35038, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35040
Reasons for increasing civil penalty amounts. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-35040, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-35040, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35040, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35042
Employers must certify that violations have been abated. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35042, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35044
For willful, repeated, or serious violations, submit additional documentation. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35044, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35046
Submitting correction action plans. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35046, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35048
Submit progress reports to the department when required. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35048, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35048, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35049
WISHA determines the date by which abatement documents must be submitted. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35049, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35050
Inform affected employees and their representatives of abatement actions you have taken. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35050, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35050, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35052
Tag cited moveable equipment to warn employees of a hazard. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 04-18-080, § 296-800-35052, filed 8/31/04, effective 11/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35052, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35056
You can request more time to comply. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-35056, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35056, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35062
WISHA's response to your request for more time. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-35062, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35062, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35062, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35063
Post the department's response. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35063, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35064
A hearing can be requested about the department's response. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-35064, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35064, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35064, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35065
Post the department's hearing notice. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35065, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35066
Hearing procedures. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35066, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35066, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35072
Post the hearing decision. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35072, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35076
Employers and employees can request an appeal of a citation and notice. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-35076, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35076, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35078
Await the department's response to your appeal request. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35078, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35080
Department actions when reassuming jurisdiction over an appeal. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35080, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35082
Appealing a corrective notice. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35082, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.
296-800-35084
Notify employees. [Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-35084, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-35084, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.] Repealed by WSR 06-06-020, filed 2/21/06, effective 6/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. Later promulgation, see chapter 296-900 chapter.


296-800-100
Introduction.

The WISHA Core Rules: Your foundation for a safe and healthful workplace. This book contains 26 basic safety and health rules that affect all employers and should cover almost everything small, nonmanufacturing employers need for a safe and healthful workplace. These core rules include requirements for your Accident Prevention Program, personal protective equipment, first aid, and hazard communication program.
Note: You may need to comply with other WISHA rules. For a complete list of WISHA rules, see the resources section of this book.
Why does workplace safety and health matter to you?
On average, two people lose their lives every week in job-related incidents in Washington state. Each year, more than 250,000 workers' compensation claims are accepted for work-related injuries and illnesses. Medical care and wage replacement for these injured workers costs more than a billion dollars. The indirect costs of workplace injuries are even larger in terms of lost quality of life, personal financial ruin, operating costs of business, and decreased profitability. Employers and employees who work together to identify and control hazards on the job can save lives and money while improving business and productivity.
What are L&I and WISHA?
The department of labor and industries (L&I) is a state agency that provides many different services:
• Workplace safety and health, including inspections and enforcement, consultation, technical assistance, training, education and grants. (WISHA)
• Workers' compensation (or industrial insurance), including claims management, rate setting, medical payments, and research.
• Specialty compliance services, including contractor registration, electrical inspections, boiler and elevator inspections, apprenticeship programs and employment standards.
Many of these services are available from L&I's twenty-two regional offices (see the resource section of this book for a list of regional offices).
In 1973, the legislature passed the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act or WISHA (Revised Code of Washington (chapter 49.17 RCW)). WISHA requires employers to provide safe and healthful workplaces for all employees. It gives L&I the responsibility to establish and enforce workplace safety and health rules. These rules are the Washington Administrative Code (WAC).
How does WISHA work?
WISHA covers nearly all employers and employees in Washington, including employees who work for the state, counties, and cities. L&I inspectors enforce WISHA rules by inspecting workplaces without advance notice including investigations of work-related deaths, injuries, and employees' complaints. When WISHA inspectors find a violation in a workplace, they issue a citation to the employer and a penalty may be attached. If you have questions about whether you are covered by WISHA, call 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233) or a local office of L&I.
What is OSHA and its relationship to WISHA?
The U.S. Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in 1971 to develop and enforce workplace safety and health rules throughout the country. States may choose to run their own safety and health programs as long as they are at least as effective as OSHA. Washington state has chosen to run its own program and most employers in the state, therefore, are subject to enforcement by L&I and not by federal OSHA.
In Washington state, OSHA covers workplaces with federal employees, nonfederal employees working on federal reservations and military bases, employees working on floating worksites (floating dry docks, fishing boats, construction barges), and employees working for tribal employers on tribal lands.
Does WISHA apply to you?
WISHA applies to almost every employer and employee in Washington. WISHA applies to you if:
• You hire someone to work for you as an employee, including workers from a temporary agency.
• You are hired to work for someone as their employee.
• You own your own business or you are a corporate officer and have elected industrial insurance coverage for yourself.
• You have a contract with someone else that primarily involves personal labor, even though you are not required to pay industrial insurance or unemployment insurance premiums.
• You volunteer your personal labor, or you have volunteers working for you who receive any benefit or compensation.
If you have any questions about your particular situation, call 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233) or contact your local office of L&I for help. See the resource section of this book for a complete list of L&I offices.
Are there other safety and health rules I need to know about?
In addition to the rules in the WISHA Safety and Health Core Rules book, there are other general WISHA rules that may apply to employers, depending upon the industry and workplace activities. See the resource section of this book for a complete list of WISHA rules or go to the web site for all the state rules administered by L&I at http://www.wa.gov/lni/home/wacs.htm. If you have questions about these rules or would like copies of them, call 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233) or your local office of L&I.
How do the WISHA rules relate to fire, building and electrical codes?
Fire codes: WISHA rules contain basic requirements for portable fire extinguishers, exit routes, housekeeping, storage, stairs and electrical hazards for the protection of employees in your workplace. The rules contained in this book are the most basic requirements to make sure that as an employer you provide a safe and healthy work environment. However, these are not the only rules regarding the requirements for portable fire extinguishers, exit routes, housekeeping, storage, stairs and electrical equipment. The fire marshal and local fire authorities enforce the Uniform Fire Code (UFC). WISHA and UFC differ in some areas, for example UFC requires exit sign lettering to be 6" or more and WISHA only states that the letters have to be clearly visible. Fire codes have more detailed and extensive requirements for the protection of the public than WISHA. Some codes overlap with WISHA requirements.
Building and electrical codes: WISHA rules are minimum requirements regardless of when the building was built or remodeled. Buildings must also comply with building and electrical codes at the time of construction. If you remodel, you must comply with the building and electrical codes applicable at that time. Building authorities and electrical inspection authorities enforce rules from the Uniform Building Code (UBC), and the National Electrical Code (NEC).
You are encouraged to call your local fire, building or electrical authority. For more information on the requirements in your area look in the government section of your phone book. Copies of these codes are available at your local library.
How can WISHA help employers and employees?
Employers can ask WISHA safety and health consultation staff for free, confidential consulting services in your workplace. WISHA safety and health professionals can examine your workplace and make recommendations about how to comply with WISHA rules. If the consultant finds hazards, the employer will be given a reasonable period of time to correct the hazard without citation or penalty.
Sometimes you might have to wait for an appointment because of the demand for these services. You still must provide a safe workplace while you wait for a consultation.
WISHA offers a wide variety of free services:
• Safety and health workshops held in locations throughout the state
• A comprehensive safety and health video lending library
• Safety and health publications geared for both employer and employee
• Web site with online publications and learning opportunities
Note:
By law, WISHA consultants do not have any enforcement authority.
Link: For more information, call 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233) or visit http://www.wa.gov/lni/home/training.htm.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-100, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-100, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-110
Employer responsibilities: Safe workplaceSummary.

Your responsibility:
To provide a safe and healthy workplace free from recognized hazards.
IMPORTANT:
Use these rules where there are no specific rules applicable to the particular hazard.
You must:
Provide a workplace free from recognized hazards.
Provide and use means to make your workplace safe.
Prohibit employees from entering, or being in, any workplace that is not safe.
Construct your workplace so it is safe.
Prohibit alcohol and narcotics from your workplace.
Prohibit employees from using tools and equipment that are not safe.
Establish, supervise, and enforce rules that lead to a safe and healthy work environment that are effective in practice.
Control chemical agents.
Protect employees from biological agents.
Note:
Employees may discuss and participate in any WISHA safety and health related practice and may refuse to perform dangerous tasks without fear of discrimination. Discrimination includes: Dismissal, demotion, loss of seniority, denial of a promotion, harassment, etc. see chapter 296-360 WAC, Discrimination pursuant to RCW 49.17.160, for a complete description of discrimination and the department's responsibility to protect employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-110, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-110, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-110, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-110, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11005
Provide a workplace free from recognized hazards.

You must:
• Provide your employees a workplace free from recognized hazards that are causing, or are likely to cause, serious injury or death.
Note:
A hazard is recognized if it is commonly known in the employer's industry, or if there is evidence that the employer knew or should have known of the existence of the hazard, or if it can be established that any reasonable person would have recognized the hazard.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-11005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11010
Provide and use means to make your workplace safe.

You must:
• Provide and use safety devices, safeguards, and use work practices, methods, processes, and means that are reasonably adequate to make your workplace safe.
– Do not remove, displace, damage, destroy or carry off any safety device, safeguard, notice or warning, furnished for use in any employment or place of employment.
– Do not interfere with use of any of the above.
– Do not interfere with the use of any method or process adopted for the protection of any employee.
– Do everything reasonably necessary to protect the life and safety of your employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11015
Prohibit employees from entering, or being in, any workplace that is not safe.

You must:
• Prohibit employees from entering, or being in, any workplace that is not safe.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11020
Construct your workplace so it is safe.

You must:
• Not construct, or cause to be constructed, a workplace that is not safe.
– This rule applies to employers, owners, and renters of property used as a place of employment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-11020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11025
Prohibit alcohol and narcotics from your workplace.

You must:
• Prohibit alcohol and narcotics from your workplace, except in industries and businesses that produce, distribute, or sell alcohol and narcotic drugs.
• Prohibit employees under the influence of alcohol or narcotics from the worksite.
EXEMPTION:
Employees who are taking prescription drugs, as directed by a physician or dentist, are exempt from this section, if the employees are not a danger to themselves or other employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11030
Prohibit employees from using tools and equipment that are not safe.

You must:
• Take responsibility for the safe condition of tools and equipment used by employees.
Note:
This applies to all equipment, materials, tools, and machinery whether owned by the employer or another firm or individual.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-11030, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11035
Establish, supervise, and enforce rules that lead to a safe and healthy work environment that are effective in practice.

You must:
• Establish, supervise, and enforce rules that lead to a safe and healthy work environment that are effective in practice.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-11035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-11040
Control chemical agents.

You must:
• Control chemical agents in a manner that they will not present a hazard to your workers; or
• Protect workers from the hazard of contact with, or exposure to, chemical agents.
Note:
Pesticides are considered to be chemical agents. As required by this rule, you must control them or provide protection to workers from exposure to pesticide hazards. Pesticide manufacturers supply precautionary statements in the information provided with the pesticide that tells you how to protect your workers from these hazards.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-11040, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-11045
Protect employees from biological agents.

You must:
(1) Protect employees from exposure to hazardous concentrations of biological agents that may result from processing, handling or using materials or waste.
Note:
Potential exposure to biological agents occurs during cleanup, or other tasks, where employees handle:
 
– Animals or animal waste
 
– Body fluids
 
– Biological agents in a medical research lab
 
– Mold or mildew
 
Check The Center of Disease Control web site (www.cdc.gov) to find published guidelines and information on safe handling and protection from specific biological agents (examples: Hanta virus, TB).
You must:
(2) Warn employees of biohazards.
• Use signs, tags, or labels to identify:
– The actual or potential presence of a biohazard;
and
– Equipment, containers, rooms, materials, experimental animals, or any combinations of these that contain viable hazardous agents.
Definition:
Biohazard means those infectious agents presenting a risk or potential risk of death, injury or illness to employees.
You must:
• Make sure the sign, tag, or label includes the biohazard symbol that is designed and proportioned in the illustration that follows.
 
You must:
• Make sure that there is sufficient contrast for the symbol to be clearly defined, if the sign, tag, or label has a background color.
Reference:
Additional requirements for biohazard signs, tags, and labels may apply. See WAC 296-823-14025 and 296-823-18040 of the Bloodborne Pathogens book.
Note:
• It's recommended that the sign, tag, or label have a key color of fluorescent orange or orange-red and lettering or symbols in a contrasting color.
 
•Appropriate wording may be used in association with the symbol to indicate:
 
– The nature or identity of the hazard;
 
– Name of individual responsible for its control;
 
– Precautionary information;
 
or
 
– Other information.
 
• This information should not be written on the symbol.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 04-18-080, § 296-800-11045, filed 8/31/04, effective 11/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-11045, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-120
Rule.

Employee's responsibility: To play an active role in creating a safe and healthy workplace and comply with all applicable safety and health rules.
Note:
Employees may discuss and participate in any WISHA safety and health related practice and may refuse to perform dangerous tasks without fear of discrimination. Discrimination includes: Dismissal, demotion, loss of seniority, denial of a promotion, harassment, etc. (see chapter 296-360 WAC, Discrimination) pursuant to RCW 49.17.160 for a complete description of discrimination and the department's responsibility to protect employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-120, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-120, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-12005
Employee responsibilities.

Employees must:
• Study and follow all safe practices that apply to their work.
• Coordinate and cooperate with all other employees in the workplace to try to eliminate on-the-job injuries and illnesses.
• Apply the principles of accident prevention in their daily work and use proper safety devices and protective equipment as required by their employment or employer.
• Take care of all personal protective equipment (PPE) properly.
• Not wear torn or loose clothing while working around machinery.
Note:
Things such as clothing, hair, and jewelry can get caught in machinery and be a hazard on the job.
Employees must:
• Report promptly to their supervisor every industrial injury or occupational illness.
• Not remove, displace, damage, or destroy or carry off any safeguard, notice, or warning provided to make the workplace safe.
• Not interfere with use of any safeguard by anyone in the workplace.
• Not interfere with the use of any work practice designed to protect them from injuries.
• Do everything reasonably necessary to protect the life and safety of employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-12005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-12005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-130
Safety committees/safety meetingsSummary.

Important:
This rule requires you to have a method of communicating and evaluating safety and health issues brought up by you or your employees in your workplace. Larger employers must establish a safety committee. Smaller employers have the choice of either establishing a safety committee or holding safety meetings with a management representative present.
There is a difference between a safety committee and a safety meeting.
• A safety committee is an organizational structure where members represent a group. This gives everyone a voice but keeps the meeting size to an effective number of participants.
• A safety meeting includes all employees and a management person is there to ensure that issues are addressed. Typically, the safety committee is an effective safety management tool for a larger employer and safety meetings are more effective for a smaller employer.
Your responsibility:
To establish a safety committee or hold safety meetings to create and maintain a safe and healthy workplace for all employees.
You must:
Establish and conduct safety committees.
Follow these rules to conduct safety meetings.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-130, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-130, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-13020
Establish and conduct safety committees.

You must:
If:
Then:
You employ 11 or more employees on the same shift at the same location
You must establish a safety committee
(1) Establish a safety committee.
• Make sure your committee:
– Has employee-elected and employer-selected members.
♦ The number of employee-elected members must equal or exceed the number of employer-selected members.
Note:
Employees selected by the employees bargaining representative or union qualify as employee-elected.
♦ The term of employee-elected members must be a maximum of one year. (There is no limit to the number of terms a representative can serve.)
♦ If there is an employee-elected member vacancy, a new member must be elected prior to the next scheduled meeting.
– Has an elected chairperson.
– Determines how often, when, and where, the safety committee will meet.
Note:
• Meetings should be one hour or less, unless extended by a majority vote of the committee.
 
• If the committee cannot agree on the frequency of meetings, the department of labor and industries regional safety consultation representative should be consulted for recommendations. (See the resources section of this book for contacts.)
You must:
(2) Cover these topics:
• Review safety and health inspection reports to help correct safety hazards.
• Evaluate the accident investigations conducted since the last meeting to determine if the cause(s) of the unsafe situation was identified and corrected.
• Evaluate your workplace accident and illness prevention program and discuss recommendations for improvement, if needed.
• Document attendance.
• Write down subjects discussed.
(3) Record meetings.
• Prepare minutes from each safety committee and:
– Preserve them for one year.
– Make them available for review by safety and health consultation personnel of the department of labor and industries.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-13020, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-13025
Follow these rules to conduct safety meetings.

You must:
If:
Then:
You have 10 or fewer employees
or
If you have 11 or more employees that
• Work on different shifts with 10 or fewer employees on each shift
or
• Work in widely separate locations with 10 or fewer employees at each location
You may choose to hold a safety meeting instead of a safety committee
(1) Do the following for safety meetings.
• Make sure your safety meetings:
– Are held monthly. You may meet more often to discuss safety issues as they come up.
– Have at least one management representative.
(2) Cover these topics.
• Review safety and health inspection reports to help correct safety hazards.
• Evaluate the accident investigations conducted since the last meeting to determine if the cause(s) of the unsafe situation was identified and corrected.
• Evaluate your workplace accident and illness prevention program and discuss recommendations for improvement, if needed.
• Document attendance.
• Write down subjects discussed.
Note:
There are no formal documentation requirements for safety meetings except for writing down who attended and the topics discussed.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-13025, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-140
Accident prevention program.

Summary.
Your responsibility: To establish, supervise and enforce an accident prevention program (APP) that is effective in practice. (You may call this your total safety and health plan.)
You must:
Develop a formal, written accident prevention program (APP).
Develop, supervise, implement, and enforce safety and health training programs that are effective in practice.
Make sure your accident prevention program (APP) is effective in practice.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-140, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-14005
Develop a formal, written accident prevention program.

You must:
• Develop a formal accident prevention program that is outlined in writing. The program must be tailored to the needs of your particular workplace or operation and to the types of hazards involved.
Note:
The term "accident prevention program" refers to your written plan to prevent accidents, illnesses, and injuries on the job. Your accident prevention program may be known as your safety and health plan, injury prevention program, or by some other name.
You must:
• Make sure your Accident Prevention Program contains at least the following elements:
– A safety orientation:
♦ A description of your total safety and health program.
♦ On-the-job orientation showing employees what they need to know to perform their initial job assignments safely.
♦ How and when to report on-the-job injuries including instruction about the location of first-aid facilities in your workplace.
♦ How to report unsafe conditions and practices.
♦ The use and care of required personal protective equipment (PPE).
♦ What to do in an emergency, including how to exit the workplace.
♦ Identification of hazardous gases, chemicals, or materials used on-the-job and instruction about the safe use and emergency action to take after accidental exposure.
– A safety and health committee.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-14005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-14020
Develop, supervise, implement, and enforce safety and health training programs that are effective in practice.

You must:
• Develop, supervise, implement, and enforce training programs to improve the skill, awareness, and competency of all your employees in the field of occupational safety and health.
• Make sure training includes on-the-job instruction to employees prior to their job assignment about hazards such as:
– Safe use of powered materials-handling equipment, such as forklifts, backhoes, etc.
– Safe use of machine tool operations.
– Use of toxic materials.
– Operation of utility systems.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-14020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-14025
Make sure your accident prevention program is effective in practice.

You must:
• Establish, supervise, and enforce your accident prevention program in a manner that is effective in practice.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-14025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-150
Rule summary.

Your responsibility: Make sure first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.
You must:
Make sure that first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.
Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.
Make sure emergency washing facilities are functional and readily accessible.
Inspect and activate your emergency washing facilities.
Make sure supplemental flushing equipment provides sufficient water.
Note:
• Employers who require their employees to provide first aid must comply with chapter 296-823 WAC, Occupational exposure to bloodborne pathogens.
 
• Your workplace may be covered by separate first-aid rules. If you do any of the types of work listed below, you must follow separate industry specific rules:
Industry
Chapter (WAC)
Agriculture
296-307
Compressed air
296-36
Construction
296-155
Firefighting
296-305
Logging
296-54
Sawmill
296-78
Ship building and repairing
296-304
You can get copies of these rules by calling 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233), or by going to http://www.lni.wa.gov.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 04-07-160, § 296-800-150, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-150, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-150, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-15005
Make sure that first-aid trained personnel are available to provide quick and effective first aid.

You must:
Comply with the first-aid training requirements of 29 C.F.R. 1910.151(b) which states:
"In the absence of an infirmary, clinic, or hospital in near proximity to the workplace, which is used for the treatment of all injured employees, a person or persons shall be adequately trained to render first aid."
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 04-07-160, § 296-800-15005, filed 3/23/04, effective 5/1/04; WSR 03-09-110, § 296-800-15005, filed 4/22/03, effective 8/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-15005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-15005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-15020
Make sure appropriate first-aid supplies are readily available.

You must:
• Make sure first-aid supplies are readily available.
• Make sure first-aid supplies at your workplace are appropriate to:
– Your occupational setting.
– The response time of your emergency medical services.
Note:
First-aid kits from your local retailer or safety supplier should be adequate for most nonindustrial employers.
You must:
• Make sure that first-aid supplies are:
– Easily accessible to all your employees.
– Stored in containers that protect them from damage, deterioration, or contamination. Containers must be clearly marked, not locked, and may be sealed.
– Able to be moved to the location of an injured or acutely ill worker.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-15020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-15030
Make sure emergency washing facilities are functional and readily accessible.

You must:
• Provide an emergency shower:
– When there is potential for major portions of an employee's body to contact corrosives, strong irritants, or toxic chemicals.
– That delivers water to cascade over the user's entire body at a minimum rate of 20 gallons (75 liters) per minute for fifteen minutes or more.
• Provide an emergency eyewash:
– When there is potential for an employee's eyes to be exposed to corrosives, strong irritants, or toxic chemicals.
– That irrigates and flushes both eyes simultaneously while the user holds their eyes open.
– With an on-off valve that activates in one second or less and remains on without user assistance until intentionally turned off.
– That delivers at least 0.4 gallons (1.5 liters) of water per minute for fifteen minutes or more.
Note:
Chemicals that require emergency washing facilities:
 
• You can determine whether chemicals in your workplace require emergency washing facilities by looking at the safety data sheet (SDS) or similar documents. The SDS contains information about first-aid requirements and emergency flushing of skin or eyes.
 
• For chemicals developed in the workplace, the following resources provide information about first-aid requirements:
 
– NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards
 
*DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 97-140
 
*http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/npg/ggdstart.html
 
– Threshold Limit Values for Chemical Substances and Physical Agents American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH)
You must:
• Make sure emergency washing facilities:
– Are located so that it takes no more than ten seconds to reach.
– Are kept free of obstacles blocking their use.
– Function correctly.
– Provide the quality and quantity of water that is satisfactory for emergency washing purposes.
Note:
• If water in emergency washing facilities is allowed to freeze, they will not function correctly. Precautions need to be taken to prevent this from happening.
 
• The travel distance to an emergency washing facility should be no more than fifty feet (15.25 meters).
 
• For further information on the design, installation, and maintenance of emergency washing facilities, see American National Standards Institute (ANSI) publication Z358.1 - 1998, Emergency Eyewash and Shower Equipment. Emergency washing facilities that are designed to meet ANSI Z358.1 - 1998 also meet the requirements of this standard. The ANSI standard can be obtained from the American National Standards Institute, 1430 Broadway, New York, New York 10018.
Reference:
• Training in the location and use of your emergency washing facilities is required under the hazard communication rule, WAC 296-901-140, and the accident prevention program rule, WAC 296-800-140.
 
• All emergency washing facilities using "not fit for drinking" (nonpotable) water must have signs stating the water is "not fit for drinking." See WAC 296-800-23010.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and 29 C.F.R. 1910 Subpart Z. WSR 14-07-086, § 296-800-15030, filed 3/18/14, effective 5/1/14. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-15030, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-15035
Inspect and activate your emergency washing facilities.

You must:
• Make sure all plumbed emergency washing facilities are inspected once a year to make sure they function correctly.
Note:
Inspections should include:
 
• Examination of the piping
 
• Making sure that water is available at the appropriate temperature and quality
 
• Activation to check that the valves and other hardware work properly
 
• Checking the water flow rate.
You must:
• Make sure plumbed emergency eyewashes and hand-held drench hoses are activated weekly to check the proper functioning of the valves, hardware, and availability of water
• Make sure all self-contained eyewash equipment and personal eyewash units are inspected and maintained according to manufacturer instructions.
– Inspections to check proper operation must be done once a year
– Sealed personal eyewashes must be replaced after the manufacturer's expiration date.
Note:
Most manufacturers recommend replacing fluid in open self-contained eyewashes every six months. The period for sealed containers is typically two years.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-15035, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-15040
Make sure supplemental flushing equipment provides sufficient water.

Note:
Supplemental flushing equipment cannot be used in place of required emergency showers or eyewashes.
You must:
• Make sure hand-held drench hoses deliver at least 3.0 gallons (11.4 liters) of water per minute for fifteen minutes or more.
Note:
Why use a drench hose? A drench hose is useful when:
 
• The spill is small and does not require an emergency shower
 
• Used with a shower for local rinsing, particularly on the lower extremities.
You must:
• Make sure personal eyewash equipment delivers only clean water or other medically approved eye flushing solutions.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-15040, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02.]



296-800-160
Summary.

Your responsibility: To make sure that your employees have, use, and care for the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE).
PPE is an item or items used to protect the eyes, face, head, body, arms, hands, legs, and feet such as goggles, helmets, head covers, gloves, rubber slickers, disposable coveralls, safety shoes, protective shields, and barriers.
You must:
Do a hazard assessment for PPE.
Document your hazard assessment for PPE.
Select appropriate PPE for your employees.
Provide PPE to your employees.
Train your employees to use PPE.
Retrain employees to use PPE, if necessary.
Document PPE training.
Require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job.
Keep your PPE safe and in good condition.
Make sure your employees use appropriate face and eye
protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate head protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate foot protection.
Make sure your employees use appropriate hand protection.
Make sure your employees are protected from drowning.
Exemption:
• WAC 296-800-16015, 296-800-16025, 296-800-16030, and 296-800-16035 do not apply to electrical protective equipment or respiratory protection. See chapters 296-24 WAC, Part L and chapter 296-842 WAC, for rules about these types of protective equipment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 05-03-093, § 296-800-160, filed 1/18/05, effective 3/1/05. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-160, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-160, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16002
Compliance duties owed to each employee.

(1) Personal protective equipment. Standards in this part requiring the employer to provide personal protective equipment (PPE), including respirators and other types of PPE, because of hazards to employees impose a separate compliance duty with respect to each employee covered by the requirement. The employer must provide PPE to each employee required to use the PPE, and each failure to provide PPE to an employee may be considered a separate violation.
(2) Training. Standards in this part requiring training on hazards and related matters, such as standards requiring that employees receive training or that the employer train employees, provide training to employees, or institute or implement a training program, impose a separate compliance duty with respect to each employee covered by the requirement. The employer must train each affected employee in the manner required by the standard, and each failure to train an employee may be considered a separate violation.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 09-15-145, § 296-800-16002, filed 7/21/09, effective 9/1/09.]



296-800-16005
Do a hazard assessment for PPE.

You must:
• Look for and identify hazards or potential hazards in your workplace and determine if PPE is necessary on the job.
Note:
PPE alone should not be relied on to provide protection for your employees. PPE should be used after all other reasonable means of reducing hazards have been carried out. Identifying hazards in your workplace should be built into your regular routine. You should take active steps to get rid of all identified hazards. For example, you can:
 
• Consider other ways to get hazardous jobs done.
 
• Reduce hazardous materials or processes.
 
• Apply engineering controls to reduce or eliminate hazards.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16010
Document your hazard assessment for PPE.

You must:
• Verify that a hazard assessment for PPE has been done at your workplace and complete a written certification (paper or electronic format) that includes the:
– Name of the workplace
– Address of the workplace you inspected for hazards
– Name of person certifying that a workplace hazard assessment was done
– Date(s) the workplace hazard assessment was done
– Statement identifying the document as the certification of hazard assessment for PPE for the workplace
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16015
Select appropriate PPE for your employees.

You must:
(1) Select appropriate PPE.
• Select appropriate PPE for your employees if hazards are present, or likely to be present.
• Select PPE for each at-risk employee to use for protection from the hazards identified in your workplace hazard assessment.
(2) Select PPE that properly fits each at-risk employee.
Note:
The hazards in your workplace have special rules that apply to them.
 
For information about PPE for specific workplaces, see these WISHA rule books:
Construction Work
Chapter 296-155 WAC
Electrical Workers
Chapter 296-45 WAC
Firefighters
Chapter 296-305 WAC
General Occupational Health Standards
Chapter 296-62 WAC
General Safety and Health Standards
Chapter 296-24 WAC
Logging Operations
Chapter 296-54 WAC
Pulp, Paper and Paper Board Mills and Converters
Chapter 296-79 WAC
Ship Repairing, Ship Building and Shipbreaking
Chapter 296-304 WAC
Ski Area Facilities and Operations
Chapter 296-59 WAC
Telecommunication
Chapter 296-32 WAC
Textile Industry
Chapter 296-301 WAC
Note:
For help in selecting PPE for your employees, you have several options. You may:
 
• Visit the OSHA web site http://www.osha-slc.gov/SLTC/personalprotectiveequipment/index.html.
 
• Call 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233) for guidelines for selecting PPE.
 
• Consult with safety and health professionals knowledgeable in this area. See resource section for links to professional organizations.
 
• Discuss PPE choices with your employees.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-16015, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16020
Provide PPE to your employees.

You must provide PPE at no cost to employees if the PPE is:
• The type that would not reasonably or normally be worn away from the workplace, such as single use or disposable PPE.
• Required to comply with a safety and health standard to protect employees wherever hazards exist from:
– Processes
– Environmental hazards
– Physical, chemical, or radiological hazards or
– Mechanical irritants that could cause injury or impairment to the function of any body part through absorption, inhalation, or physical contact.
Table-X: Employer Responsibility for Providing PPE
*This table provides examples only and is not all-inclusive.
Part of Body
PPE employers are required to provide at no cost to employees.
Items in which employer payment is not required.
Head
Bump caps.
Hard hat.
Nonconductive head protection.
Eye and Face
Face shields.
Goggles.
Laser safety goggles.
Nonprescription eye protection.
Prescription eyewear inserts/lenses for full-face respirators.
Welding and diving helmets.
Nonspecialty prescription safety eyewear.
Ear
Hearing protection.
Hand/
Arm
Aluminized gloves.
Barrier creams (unless used solely for weather-related protection).
Chemical resistant gloves/aprons/
clothing.
Hand protection used only for keeping clean or for cold weather with no safety or health consideration.
 
Mesh cut proof gloves.
Mesh or leather aprons.
Nonspecialty gloves if required to protect from dermatitis, severe cuts, or abrasions.
Rubber insulating gloves.
Rubber sleeves.
 
Foot
Metatarsal foot protection.
Rubber boots with steel toes.
Shoe covers - Toe caps and metatarsal guards.
Special boots for longshoremen working logs.
Nonspecialty safety-toe protective footwear such as steel-toe shoes or boots.
Sturdy work shoes.
Lineman's boots.
Logging boots required under chapter 296-54 WAC.
Other
Atmosphere-supplying respirators (escape only).
Climbing ensembles used by linemen such as belts and climbing hooks.
Long sleeve shirts.
Long pants.
Ordinary cold weather gear (coats, parkas, cold weather gloves, winter boots).
 
Level A - Fully encapsulated chemical protective suits.
Level B - Chemical protective clothing.
Personal fall arrest systems.
Personal fall restraint systems.
Firefighting PPE (helmet, gloves, boots, proximity suits, full gear).
Ordinary rain gear.
Dust mask/respirators used under the voluntary use provisions in chapter 296-842 WAC.
Back belts. Sunglasses.
Sunscreen.
 
Ladder safety device belts.
Personal floatation devices (life jackets).
Class II or III high visibility garments that meet ANSI 107-2004 specifications.
 
 
Respiratory protection.
SCBA (self-contained breathing apparatus).
Welding PPE.
 
 
Window cleaner's safety straps.
Items such as aprons, lab coats, goggles, disposable gloves, shoe covers, etc., used in medical/
laboratory settings to protect from exposure to infectious agents.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 09-05-071, § 296-800-16020, filed 2/17/09, effective 4/1/09. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-16020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16025
Train your employees to use PPE.

You must:
• Communicate your PPE selection decision to each at-risk employee.
• Provide training to each employee who is required to use PPE on the job. Each affected employee must be trained to know at least the following:
– When PPE is necessary
– What PPE is necessary
– How to put on, take off, adjust, and wear PPE
– Limitations of PPE
– Proper care, maintenance, useful life, and disposal of PPE.
• Make sure before an employee is allowed to perform work requiring the use of PPE that the employee can:
– Demonstrate an understanding of the training specified above; and
– Demonstrate the ability to use PPE properly.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-16025, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16030
Retrain employees to use PPE, if necessary.

You must:
• Retrain an employee when you have reason to believe the understanding, motivation, and skills required to use the PPE has not been retained. Circumstances where retraining is required include:
– Changes in the workplace that make previous training out of date.
– Changes in the types of PPE to be used make previous training out of date.
– Work habits or demonstrated knowledge indicate that the employee has not retained the necessary understanding, skill, or motivation to use PPE.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16035
Document PPE training.

You must:
• Document in writing that each employee using PPE has received and understood the required training.
This documentation must include:
– Name of each employee
– Date(s) of training
– Subject of the training
Note:
Documentation may be stored on a computer as long as it is available to safety and health personnel from the department of labor and industries.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16040
Require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job.

You must:
• Require your employees to use necessary PPE on the job.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16045
Keep PPE in safe and good condition.

You must:
• Make sure all PPE is safe for the work to be performed. It must:
– Be durable.
– Fit snugly.
– Not interfere with the employee's movements.
• Make sure PPE is used and maintained in a clean and reliable condition.
– Defective equipment MUST NOT be used.
• Make sure if employees provide their own PPE, that it is adequate for the workplace hazards, and maintained in a clean and reliable condition.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16045, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16050
Make sure your employees use appropriate eye and face protection.

You must:
• Make sure that employees exposed to hazards that could injure their eyes and/or face use appropriate protection. Examples of these hazards include:
– Flying particles.
– Molten metal.
– Liquid chemicals.
– Acids or caustic liquids.
– Chemical gases or vapors.
– Any light that could injure the eyes such as lasers, ultraviolet, or infrared light.
– Objects that puncture.
• Make sure employees exposed to hazards from flying objects have eye protection with side protection, such as safety glasses with clip-on or slide-on side shields.
• Make sure eye protection for employees who wear prescription lenses:
– Incorporates the prescription into the design of the eye protection; or
– Is large enough to be worn over the prescription lenses without disturbing them.
• Make sure PPE used to protect the eyes and face meet the specifics of either the 1989 version, the 1998 revision, or the 2003 version of ANSI Z87.1, American National Standard Practice for Occupational and Education Eye and Face Protection.
Other protective eye and face protection devices may be used if the employer demonstrates that they are at least as effective as those constructed in accordance with one of the above consensus standards.
Note:
ANSI is the American National Standards Institute that publishes nationally recognized safety and health requirements. Their address is:
 
ANSI (American National Standards Institute)
 
1819 L Street NW
 
Washington, DC 20036
 
Phone: (202) 293-8020
 
Fax: (202) 293-9287
 
http://www.ansi.org
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 10-09-088, § 296-800-16050, filed 4/20/10, effective 6/1/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-16050, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-16050, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16050, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16055
Make sure your employees use appropriate head protection.

You must:
(1) Make sure employees wear appropriate protective helmets.
• Where employees are exposed to hazards that could cause a head injury. Examples of this type of hazard include:
– Flying or propelled objects.
– Falling objects or materials.
• Where employees are working around or under scaffolds or other overhead structures.
(2) Head protection must comply with any of the following consensus standards:
(a) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-2009, "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection";
(b) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-2003, "American National Standard for Industrial Head Protection";
(c) American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Z89.1-1997, "American National Standard for Personnel ProtectionProtective Headwear for Industrial WorkersRequirements."
– You may use protective helmets that do not meet these ANSI standards if you can demonstrate that they are equally effective as those constructed in accordance with the above ANSIs.
(3) Make sure employees working near exposed electrical conductors that could contact their head wear a protective helmet designed (that meet the above ANSI standards) to reduce electrical shock hazard.
• Caps with metal buttons or metal visors must not be worn around electrical hazards.
(4) Make sure employees working around machinery or in locations that present a hair-catching or fire hazard wear caps or head coverings that completely cover their hair.
• Employees must wear a hair net that controls all loose ends when:
– Hair is as long as the radius of pressure rolls with exposed in-running nip points.
– Hair is twice as long as the circumference of exposed revolving shafts or tools in fixed machines.
• Employees must wear a hair covering of solid material when:
– The employee is exposed to an ignition source and may run into an area containing category 1 or 2 flammable liquids, such as ether, benzene, or category 3 flammable liquids with a flashpoint between 100°F (37.8°C), or combustible atmospheres if their hair is on fire.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and 29 C.F.R. 1910 Subpart Z. WSR 14-07-086, § 296-800-16055, filed 3/18/14, effective 5/1/14. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 14-03-013, § 296-800-16055, filed 1/7/14, effective 2/10/14; WSR 10-09-088, § 296-800-16055, filed 4/20/10, effective 6/1/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16055, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16060
Make sure your employees use appropriate foot protection.

You must:
(1) Use appropriate foot protection.
• Where employees are exposed to hazards that could injure their feet. Examples of these hazards are:
– Falling objects
– Rolling objects
– Piercing/cutting injuries
– Electrical hazards
• That meets the specifications of one of the following consensus standards:
• ASTM F-2412-2005, Standard Test Methods for Foot Protection, and ASTM F-2413-2005, Standard Specification for Performance Requirements for Protective Footwear.
• ANSI Z41-1999, American National Standard for Personal ProtectionProtective Footwear.
• ANSI Z41-1991, American National Standard for Personal ProtectionProtective Footwear.
– Protective footwear that does not meet these standards may be used if you demonstrate that it is equally effective as that constructed in accordance with one of the above consensus standards.
(2) Make sure your employees wear calks or other suitable footwear to protect against slipping while they are working on top of logs.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 10-09-088, § 296-800-16060, filed 4/20/10, effective 6/1/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16060, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16065
Make sure your employees use appropriate hand protection.

You must:
• Make sure employees exposed to hazards that could injure their hands use appropriate hand protection. Examples of these hazards include:
– Absorbing harmful substances
– Severe cuts, lacerations or abrasions
– Punctures
– Chemical burns and/or thermal burns
– Harmful temperature extremes
• Make sure when choosing hand protection, you consider how well the hand protection performs relative to the:
– Task
– Conditions present
– Duration of use
– Hazards
– Potential hazards
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16065, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-16070
Make sure your employees are protected from drowning.

You must:
(1) Provide and make sure your employees wear personal flotation devices (PFD).
• When they work in areas where the danger of drowning exists, such as:
– On the water.
– Over the water.
– Alongside the water.
Note:
Employees are not exposed to the danger of drowning when:
 
– Employees are working behind standard height and strength guardrails.
 
– Employees are working inside operating cabs or stations that eliminate the possibility of accidentally falling into the water.
 
– Employees are wearing an approved safety belt with a lifeline attached that prevents the possibility of accidentally falling into the water.
You must:
• Provide your employees with PFDs approved by the United States Coast Guard for use on commercial or merchant vessels. The following are appropriate or allowable United States Coast Guard-approved PFDs:
Type of PFD
General Description
Type I
Off-shore life jacket - Effective for all waters or where rescue may be delayed.
Type II
Near-shore buoyant vest - Intended for calm, inland water or where there is a good chance of quick rescue.
Type III
Flotation aid - Good for calm, inland water, or where there is a good chance of rescue.
Type V
Flotation aids such as boardsailing vests, deck suits, work vests and inflatable PFDs marked for commercial use.
Note:
• Commercially available PFDs are marked or imprinted with the type of PFD.
 
• Type IV PFDs are throwable devices. They are used to aid persons who have fallen into the water.
You must:
• Inspect PFDs before and after each use for defects and make sure that defective PFDs are not used.
(2) Provide approved life rings with an attached line on all docks, walkways, and fixed installations on or adjacent to water more than five feet deep.
• Life rings must:
– Be United States Coast Guard approved 30 inch size.
– Have attached lines that are at least 90 feet in length.
– Have attached lines at least 1/4 inch in diameter.
– Have attached lines with a minimum breaking strength of 500 pounds.
– Be spaced no more than 200 feet apart.
– Be kept in easily visible and readily accessible locations.
• Life rings and attached lines must:
– Be maintained to retain at least 75 percent of their designed buoyancy and strength.
– Be provided in the immediate vicinity when employees are assigned work at other casual locations where the risk of drowning exists.
– Work assigned over water where the vertical drop from an accidental fall would be more than 50 feet, must be subject to specific procedures as approved by the department.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-16070, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-16070, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-170
Employer chemical hazard communicationIntroduction.

important:
Thousands of chemicals can be found in today's workplaces. These chemicals may have the capacity to cause health problems, from minor skin irritations to serious injuries or diseases like cancer. You should review the type of chemicals you use and consider using less hazardous chemicals (such as less toxic and nonflammable chemicals).
The Employer Chemical Hazard Communication rule was developed to make sure employers and employees are informed about chemical hazards in the workplace.
This rule applies to:
• Employers engaged in businesses where chemicals are used, distributed, or produced for use or distribution.
• Contractors or subcontractors that work for employers engaged in businesses where chemicals are used, distributed, or produced for use or distribution.
Exemptions:
Certain products, chemicals, or items are exempt from this rule. Below is a summarized list of these exemptions. See WAC 296-800-17055 at the end of this rule to get complete information about these exemptions:
 
• Any hazardous waste as defined by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.), when subject to regulations issued under that act by the Environmental Protection Agency.
 
• Any hazardous substance as defined by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability ACT (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.) when the hazardous substance is the focus of remedial or removal action being conducted under CERCLA in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
 
– Tobacco or tobacco products
 
– Wood or wood products that are not chemically treated and will not be processed, for example, by sawing and sanding
 
– Food or alcoholic beverages
 
– Some drugs, such as retail or prescription medications
 
– Retail cosmetics
 
– Ionizing and nonionizing radiation
 
– Biological hazards
 
– Any consumer product or hazardous substance when workplace exposure is the same as that of a consumer
 
♦ Retail products used in offices in the same manner and frequency used by consumers can be termed "consumer products," and include things such as: Correction fluid, glass cleaner, and dishwashing liquid.
 
Example: If you use a household cleaner in your workplace in the same manner and frequency that a consumer would use it when cleaning their house, your exposure should be the same as the consumer's, you are exempt. A janitor using a household cleaner, such as bleach, throughout the day, is not considered to be a consumer, and is not exempt.
 
– Manufactured items that remain intact are exempt from this rule.
 
– Manufactured items that are fluids or in the form of particles are not exempt from this rule.
 
The following are examples:
Item
Covered by this rule
Not covered by this rule
Brick
Sawed or cut in half
Used whole or intact
Pipe
Cut by a torch
Bent with a tube bender
Nylon Rope
Burning the ends
Tying a knot
Reference:
• If you produce, import, distribute and/or repackage chemicals, or choose not to rely on labels or material safety data sheets provided by the manufacturer or importer, you must comply with chemical hazard communication for manufacturers, importers and distributers, WAC 296-62-054.
 
• You may withhold trade secret information under certain circumstances. See trade secrets, WAC 296-62-053, to find out what information may be withheld as a trade secret and what information must be released.
Your responsibility:
To inform and train your employees about the hazards of chemicals they may be exposed to during normal working conditions, or in foreseeable emergencies by:
• Making a list of the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace
• Preparing a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program for your workplace
• Informing your employees about this rule and your program
• Providing training to your employees about working in the presence of hazardous chemicals
• Getting and keeping the material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for the hazardous chemicals
• Making sure that labels on containers of hazardous chemicals are in place and easy to read.
You must:
Develop, implement, maintain, and make available a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
Include multiemployer workplaces in your program if necessary.
Identify and list all the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace.
Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDS) for each hazardous chemical used.
Make sure that material safety data sheets (MSDS) are readily accessible to your employees and NIOSH.
Label containers holding hazardous chemicals.
Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace.
Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals.
Follow these rules for handling chemicals in factory sealed containers.
The department must:
Translate certain chemical hazard communication documents upon request.
Attempt to obtain a material safety data sheet (MSDS) upon request.
Exemption:
Items or chemicals exempt from the rule, and exemptions from labeling.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 09-10-078, § 296-800-170, filed 5/5/09, effective 6/15/09; WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-170, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-170, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-170, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-170, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17005
Develop, implement, maintain, and make available a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.

You must:
• Develop, implement, maintain, and make available a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program specific to your workplace. The Chemical Hazard Communication Program must, at a minimum, include:
– A list of hazardous chemicals known to be present in your workplace.
– Procedures for making sure all containers are properly labeled.
– A description of how you are going to obtain and maintain your material safety data sheets (MSDSs).
– A description of how you are going to train and inform your employees about hazardous chemicals in their workplace.
– A description of how you are going to inform your employees about:
♦ Chemical hazards used during nonroutine tasks.
♦ The hazards associated with chemicals contained in unlabeled pipes in employee work areas.
You must:
• Make your Chemical Hazard Communication Program available to your employees.
Note:
• You must make the written Chemical Hazard Communication Program available, upon request, to employees, their designated representatives, the department and NIOSH, in accordance with the requirements of chapter 296-802 WAC, Employee medical and exposure records.
 
• Where employees must travel between workplaces during a workshift, that is, if their work is carried out at more than one geographical location, the written Chemical Hazard Communication Program may be kept at the primary workplace facility.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 04-10-026, § 296-800-17005, filed 4/27/04, effective 8/1/04; WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-17005, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17007
Include multiemployer workplaces in your program if necessary.

IMPORTANT:
• Sharing chemical hazard information at multiemployer workplaces is required for the success of your hazard communication program and the success of other employers' programs.
• This section applies to a site where you or your employees work if:
– Your employees may be exposed to hazardous chemicals used by another employer;
or
– Another employer's employees may be exposed to hazardous chemicals you or your employees use.
Examples include employees of construction companies, cleaning services, or maintenance contractors visiting or working on-site.
You must:
• Include, in your written Chemical Hazard Communication Program, the methods you will use to share the following hazard information with other employers when their employees share a workplace with you and are potentially exposed to chemicals you produce, use, or store:
– How you will provide other employers with a copy of the relevant material safety data sheets (MSDSs), or provide access to the MSDSs in a specified location.
– How you will inform the other employers of any precautionary measures needed to protect employees during normal operating conditions and in foreseeable emergencies.
– A description of how you will inform other employers of the labeling system you use.
Note:
You may rely on another employer's Chemical Hazard Communication Program to share the information required if the program meets the requirements of this rule.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-17007, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-17010
Identify and list all the hazardous chemicals present in your workplace.

You must:
• Identify all hazardous chemicals at your workplace.
– This includes any chemical that is known to be present in your workplace in such a way that employees may be exposed to it under normal conditions of use or in a foreseeable emergency.
• Create a list of these chemicals using the chemical or common name on the material safety data sheet (MSDS).
This list:
– Must be compiled for the workplace as a whole, or for individual work areas.
– Is necessary to make sure that all hazardous chemicals are identified and that MSDS, and labeling rules are met.
– Must be current.
Note:
The following are some ways to determine whether a product is hazardous:
 
• Look for words on the label, such as "CAUTION," "WARNING," or "DANGER."
 
• Look for words or "hazard coding" that indicate that the chemical is flammable, an irritant, corrosive, carcinogenic, etc. "Hazard coding" refers to words, numbers, or colors that tell you a chemical is dangerous.
 
• Check the product's MSDS for hazard information.
 
Examples of hazardous chemicals are: Acids, adhesives, caustics, fuels, paints, varnishes, shellacs and pesticides. Too many other classes of hazardous chemicals exist to list them all here. If you have any questions about a chemical you have at your workplace, contact your local L&I office (see the resource section of this book).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17015
Obtain and maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) for each hazardous chemical used.

Note:
MSDSs are a type of employee exposure record. Therefore, you must comply with the material safety data sheets (MSDSs) as exposure records, WAC 296-800-180, located in this book.
You must:
• Obtain a MSDS for each hazardous chemical used as soon as possible if the MSDS is not provided with the shipment of a hazardous chemical, from the chemical manufacturer or importer.
Note:
• To obtain a MSDS, you may try calling the manufacturer or checking their web site.
 
• If you have a commercial account with a retailer or wholesaler, you have the right to request and receive a MSDS about hazardous chemicals you purchase.
 
• If a chemical is purchased from a retailer with no commercial accounts, you have the right to request and receive the manufacturer's name and address so that you can contact them and request a MSDS for the chemical.
 
• Whoever prepares the MSDS is required to mark all blocks on the form, even if there is no relevant information for that section.
 
• If you have problems getting a MSDS within 30 calendar days after making a written request to the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor, you can get help from WISHA. You may contact your local regional office for assistance or make a written request for assistance to the:
 
Department of Labor and Industries
 
Right-to-Know Program
 
P.O. Box 44610
 
Olympia, Washington 98504-4610.
 
Include in your request:
 
– A copy of the purchaser's written request to the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor.
 
– The name of the product suspected of containing a hazardous chemical.
 
– The identification number of the product, if available.
 
– A copy of the product label, if available.
 
– The name and address of the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor from whom the product was obtained.
You must:
• Maintain a MSDS for each hazardous chemical:
– Keep copies of the required MSDSs for each hazardous chemical present in your workplace.
– Each MSDS must be in English. You may also keep copies in other languages.
Reference:
See material safety data sheets and label preparation, chapter 296-839 WAC, if you choose to create your own MSDS or label.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-17015, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17015, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17020
Make sure material safety data sheets (MSDSs) are readily accessible to your employees and NIOSH.

You must:
• Make sure that MSDSs are readily accessible, easily obtained without delay during each work shift by employees when they are in their work area(s).
• Make sure that employees, who must travel between workplaces during a work shift, such as when their work is carried out at more than one geographical location, can immediately obtain the required MSDS information in an emergency. (MSDSs may be kept at a central location at the primary workplace facility and accessed by means such as voice communication or laptop computer.)
Note:
• Electronic access (such as computer or fax), microfiche, and other alternatives to maintaining paper copies of the MSDSs are permitted as long as they do not create barriers to immediate employee access in each workplace.
 
• Barriers to immediate access of electronic MSDSs may include:
 
– Power outages
 
– Equipment failure
 
– System delays
 
– Deficient user knowledge to operate equipment
 
– Location of equipment outside the work area.
 
Solutions to eliminating these and other possible barriers to access may require the availability of back-up systems, employee training, and providing access equipment in the work areas.
You must:
• Make MSDSs readily available, when requested, to representatives of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-17020, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-17020, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17025
Label containers holding hazardous chemicals.

Exemptions:
• The following is a summary of items that are exempt from this rule:
 
– Pesticides, when labeled as required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).
 
– Food, food additives, color additives, drugs, cosmetics, or medical/veterinary devices or products.
 
– Alcoholic beverages not intended for industrial use.
 
– Consumer products labeled as required by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
 
– Agriculture or vegetable seeds treated and labeled as required by the Federal Seed Act.
 
For complete information about each of these, see WAC 296-800-17055.
Note:
You are not required to label portable containers into which hazardous chemicals are transferred from labeled containers, if the chemical is used and controlled by the same employee who performed the transfer within the same shift.
You must:
• Make sure that each container of hazardous chemicals in the workplace is labeled, tagged, or marked with the following information:
– The identity of the hazardous chemical(s) using either the chemical or common name.
– Appropriate hazard warnings which give general information about the relevant health and physical hazards of the chemicals. This includes health effects information, such as information about organs most likely to be affected by the chemicals.
– For individual stationary process containers, you may use alternate labeling methods such as:
♦ Signs
♦ Placards
♦ Process sheets
♦ Batch tickets
♦ Operating procedures or
♦ Other such written materials,
as long as the alternate method identifies the containers and conveys the required label information.
Note:
• You do not need to put on new labels if existing labels already provide the required information.
 
• You are not required to list each component in a hazardous mixture on the label. If a mixture is referred to on an MSDS by a product name, then the product name should be used as the identifier.
 
• You may use words, pictures, symbols, or any combination of these, to communicate the hazards of the chemical.
Sample Container Labels
 
 
• Be sure to train your employees so they can demonstrate a knowledge of the labeling system you use.
 
• Some alternative labeling systems do no communicate target organ information, so the employee will have to rely on training provided by the employer to obtain this information.
You must:
• Not remove or deface existing labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals unless the container is immediately labeled with the required information.
 
This is an example of a labeled container. You may use a laminated or coated label, affixed to the container with a wire, to avoid deterioration of labels due to a solvent, such as acetone.
You must:
• Make sure that labels or other forms of warning are legible, in English, and prominently displayed on the container, or readily available in the work area throughout each work shift.
Note:
Employers with non-English speaking employees may use other languages in the warning information in addition to the English language.
• Make sure if the hazardous chemical is regulated by WISHA or OSHA in a substance-specific health rule, that the labels or other warnings are used according to those rules.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-17025, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17025, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17030
Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace.

You must:
• Provide employees with effective information on hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial job assignment. Whenever a new physical or health hazard related to chemical exposure is introduced into their employees' work areas, information must be provided.
– Inform employees of:
♦ The requirements of this rule
♦ Any operations in their work area where hazardous chemicals are present
♦ The location and availability of your written Chemical Hazard Communication Program, including the list(s) of hazardous chemicals and material safety data sheets (MSDSs) required by this rule.
• Provide employees with effective training about hazardous chemicals in their work area at the time of their initial job assignment. Whenever a new physical or health hazard related to chemical exposure is introduced, the employees must be trained.
• Make sure employee training includes:
– Methods and observations that may be used to detect the presence or release of a hazardous chemical in the work area. Examples of these methods and observations may include:
♦ Monitoring conducted by you
♦ Continuous monitoring devices
♦ Visual appearance or odor of hazardous chemicals when being released
– Physical and health hazards of the chemicals in the work area, including the likely physical symptoms or effects of overexposure
– Steps employees can take to protect themselves from the chemical hazards in your workplace, including specific procedures implemented by you to protect employees from exposure to hazardous chemicals. Specific procedures may include:
♦ Appropriate work practices
♦ Engineering controls
♦ Emergency procedures
♦ Personal protective equipment to be used
– Details of the chemical hazard communication program developed by you, including an explanation of the labeling system and the MSDS, and how employees can obtain and use the appropriate hazard information.
• Tailor information and training to the types of hazards to which employees will be exposed. The information and training may be designed to cover categories of hazards, such as flammability or cancer-causing potential, or it may address specific chemicals. Chemical-specific information must always be available through labels and MSDSs
• Make reasonable efforts to post notices in your employees' native languages (as provided by the department) if those employees have trouble communicating in English.
Note:
• Interactive computer-based training or training videos can be used provided they are effective.
 
• Your MSDSs may not have WISHA permissible exposure limits (PELs) listed. In some cases, WISHA PELs are stricter than the OSHA PELs and other exposure limits listed on the MSDSs you receive. If this is the case, you must refer to the WISHA PEL table, WAC 296-62-075, for the appropriate exposure limits to be covered during training.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-17030, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17030, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17035
Follow these rules for laboratories using hazardous chemicals.

Note:
• Laboratories are required to have a written chemical hygiene plan under chapter 296-828 WAC, if applicable. They are not required to have a written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
 
• You may combine your accident prevention program and chemical hazard communication program to assist you in developing a chemical hygiene plan for your laboratory.
You must:
(1) Make sure that labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals are in place and readable.
(2) Maintain material safety data sheets (MSDSs) received with incoming shipments of hazardous chemicals and make them readily accessible to laboratory employees when they are in their work areas.
Note:
Laboratory employers that ship hazardous chemicals are considered to be either chemical manufacturers or distributors. When laboratory employers ship hazardous chemicals they must comply with the rule, "hazard communication standards for chemical manufacturers, importers and distributors," WAC 296-62-054.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 06-02-060, § 296-800-17035, filed 1/3/06, effective 4/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17035, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17040
Follow these rules for handling chemicals in factory-sealed containers.

This applies to situations where employees only handle chemicals in factory-sealed containers that are not opened under normal use (such as those found in marine cargo handling, trucking, warehousing, or retail sales).
You must:
(1) Make sure that labels on incoming containers of hazardous chemicals are in place and readable.
(2) Keep or obtain material safety data sheets (MSDSs).
• Keep any MSDSs that are received with incoming shipments of the sealed containers of hazardous chemicals.
• If a factory-sealed container of hazardous chemicals comes without a MSDS, obtain one as soon as possible, if an employee requests it.
(3) Make sure that the MSDSs are readily accessible during each work shift to employees when they are in their work area(s).
(4) Inform and train your employees about hazardous chemicals in your workplace, to protect them in case of a hazardous chemical spill or leak from a factory-sealed container. You do not have to cover the location and availability of the written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-17040, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17045
Translate certain chemical hazard communication documents upon request.

The department must:
• Upon receipt of a written or verbal request, prepare and make available (within available resources) to employers or the public, a translation into Cambodian, Chinese, Korean, Spanish, or Vietnamese of any of the following:
– An employer's written Chemical Hazard Communication Program.
– A material safety data sheet or
– Written materials prepared by the department to inform employees of their rights described in this rule, regarding chemical hazard communication.
Note:
Written requests for translations should be directed to:
 
Department of Labor and Industries
 
Right-to-Know Program
 
P.O. Box 44610
 
Olympia, Washington 98504-4610.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17045, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17050
Attempt to obtain a material safety data sheet (MSDS) upon request.

The department must:
• Upon receipt of an employer's written request for a material safety data sheet, attempt to obtain the MSDS from the chemical manufacturer, importer, or distributor. When the department receives the MSDS, the department must forward a copy of it to the purchaser at no cost. Small business employers will be given priority for this service.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17050, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-17055
Items or chemicals exempt from the rule, and exemptions from labeling.

• Listed below are the full descriptions of the items or chemicals that are exempt, or not covered, by this rule:
– Any consumer product or hazardous substance, defined in the Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U.S.C. 2051 et seq.) and Federal Hazardous Substance Act (15 U.S.C. 1261 et seq.) respectively, where you can show that it is used in the workplace for the purpose intended by the chemical manufacturer or importer of the product, and the use results in a duration and frequency of exposure that is not greater than the range of exposures that could reasonably be experienced by consumers when used for the purpose intended.
– Any hazardous waste defined by the Hazardous Waste Management Act chapter 70.105 RCW, when subject to regulations issued under that act by the department of ecology that describes specific safety, labeling, personnel training, and other rules for the accumulation, handling and management of hazardous waste.
– Any hazardous waste defined by the Solid Waste Disposal Act, as amended by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, as amended (42 U.S.C. 6901 et seq.), when subject to regulations issued under that act by the Environmental Protection Agency.
– Any hazardous substance defined by the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) (42 U.S.C. 9601 et seq.), when the hazardous substance is the focus of remedial or removal action being conducted under CERCLA in accordance with Environmental Protection Agency regulations.
– Tobacco or tobacco products.
– Wood or wood products, including lumber that will not be processed, where the chemical manufacturer or importer can establish that the only hazard they pose to the employees is the potential for flammability or combustibility. Wood or wood products that have been treated with hazardous chemicals covered by this rule, and wood that may be subsequently sawed or cut, generating dust, are not exempted.
– Articles, meaning manufactured items other than a fluid or particle that:
♦ Are formed to a specific shape or design during manufacture;
♦ Have end use function(s) dependent in whole or in part upon their shape or design during end use; and
♦ Under normal conditions of use, do not release more than very small quantities, for example, minute or trace amounts of a hazardous chemical such as, emissions from a marking pen or a newly varnished wood chair, and do not pose a physical hazard or health risk to employees
– Food or alcoholic beverages that are sold, used, or prepared in a retail establishment such as a grocery store, restaurant, or drinking place, and foods intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace.
– Any drug, defined in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.), when it is in solid, final form for direct administration to the patient (for example, tablets or pills); drugs that are packaged by the chemical manufacturer for sale to consumers in a retail establishment (for example, over-the-counter drugs); and drugs intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace (for example, first-aid supplies). Aerosolized or cytotoxic drugs administered by a health care worker are not excluded.
– Cosmetics packaged for sale to consumers in a retail establishment, and cosmetics intended for personal consumption by employees while in the workplace.
– Ionizing and nonionizing radiation.
– Biological hazards.
• This rule does not require labeling of the following chemicals:
– Any pesticide defined in the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (7 U.S.C. 136 et seq.), when subject to the labeling requirements of that act and labeling regulations issued under that act by the Environmental Protection Agency.
– Any chemical substance or mixture defined in the Toxic Substance Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2601 et seq.), when subject to the labeling requirements of that act, and labeling requirements issued under that act by the Environmental Protection Agency.
– Any food, food additive, color additive, drug, cosmetic, or medical/veterinary device or product, including materials intended for use as ingredients in such products (for example, flavors and fragrances), are defined in the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 301 et seq.) or the Virus-Serum Toxin Act of 1913 (21 U.S.C. 151 et seq.) and regulations issued under those acts, when they are subject to the labeling requirements under those acts by either the Food and Drug Administration or the Department of Agriculture.
– Any distilled spirits (beverage alcohols), wine, or malt beverage intended for nonindustrial use, defined in the Federal Alcohol Administration Act (27 U.S.C. 201 et seq.) and regulations issued under that act, when subject to the labeling requirements of that act and labeling regulations issued under that act by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms.
– Any consumer product or hazardous substance defined in the Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U.S.C. 2051 et seq.) and Federal Hazardous Substances Act (15 U.S.C. 1261 et seq.) respectively, when subject to a consumer product safety rule or labeling requirement of those acts, or regulations issued under those acts by the Consumer Product Safety Commission.
– Agricultural or vegetable seed treated with pesticides and labeled in accordance with the Federal Seed Act (7 U.S.C. 1551 et seq.) and the labeling requirements issued under that act by the Department of Agriculture.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-17055, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-180
Material safety data sheets (MSDSs) as exposure records.

Important: Exposure records contain information about employees' exposure to toxic substances or harmful physical agents. Material safety data sheets (MSDSs) are one type of exposure record. The preservation of and access to exposure records is necessary to improve detection, treatment, and prevention of occupational diseases.
This rule supplements the chemical hazard communication rule by extending access to MSDSs, or their alternative, after employment and after the hazardous chemical is no longer used in the workplace.
Your responsibility:
To preserve and provide access to material safety data sheets (MSDSs) or their alternative as exposure records.
You must:
Preserve exposure records for at least thirty years.
Inform current employees of exposure records.
Provide access to exposure records.
Transfer records when ceasing to do business.
Note:
• Employee medical and exposure records, chapter 296-802 WAC, requires the preservation and access to other exposure records including records such as workplace monitoring data and biological monitoring results and medical records. If you keep these other types of employee exposure records or employee medical records, you must comply with these additional requirements.
 
• This rule applies to every employer who maintains, makes, contracts for, or has access to MSDSs for chemicals used in their workplace.
 
• The specific identity of a toxic substance may be withheld from a disclosable record if it is a verifiable trade secret. For trade secret requirements see chapter 296-816 WAC.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 04-10-026, § 296-800-180, filed 4/27/04, effective 8/1/04. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-180, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-180, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-18005
Preserve exposure records for at least 30 years.

You must:
• Keep material safety data sheets (MSDSs) and analysis using MSDSs for at least thirty years, including current, former, and future employers receiving transferred records. Preserve MSDSs in any form, as long as the information is not altered and is retrievable. You may keep alternative records instead of MSDSs concerning the identity of a substance. The alternative record must also be kept for thirty years and contain the following information:
– Some record of the identity (chemical name, if known) of a substance or agent
– Where the substance or agent was used
– When the substance or agent was used
Note:
Keeping alternative records may be less work than you think. When developing your hazard communication program's list of hazardous chemicals (WAC 296-800-17010), add the "where used" and "when used" information required by this rule.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-18005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-18010
Inform current employees of exposure records.

You must:
• Inform current employees who are, or will be exposed to a toxic chemical of:
Note:
A chemical is toxic if:
 
• The latest printed edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) lists the substance. This may be obtained online, CD-ROM, or on a computer tape.
 
• Testing by or known to the employer has shown positive evidence that the substance is an acute or chronic health hazard.
 
• A material safety data sheet (MSDS) kept by or known to the employer shows the material may be a hazard to human health.
– The existence, location, and availability of MSDSs or alternative records, and any other records covered by this rule.
– The person responsible for maintaining and providing access to records.
– Exposure records when the employee first enters into employment and then once a year thereafter.
– Existence and their rights of access to these records.
Note:
Informing employees of the availability of these records may be accomplished by posting, group discussion or by individual notifications.
You must:
• Keep a copy of this rule and make copies available upon request to employees.
• Distribute to employees any informational materials about this rule that are made available to the employer by the department.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-18010, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-18010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-18015
Provide access to exposure records.

You must:
• Provide access, whenever requested by an employee or their designated representative, to a relevant exposure record:
– In a reasonable time, place, and manner.
– Within fifteen working days. If the employer cannot meet this requirement, they must inform the requesting party of the reason for the delay and the earliest date the record will be made available.
Note:
• Employee means any current, former or transferred worker.
 
• A relevant exposure record is an MSDS or its alternative or analysis using MSDSs or their alternative.
You must:
• Make sure labor and industries has prompt access to any exposure records and related analysis. This must be done without violation of any rights under the Constitution or the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act that the employer chooses to exercise.
Note:
Nothing in this rule is meant to prevent employees and collective bargaining agents from getting access to information beyond that is required by this rule.
You must:
• Make sure that whenever an employee or designated representative requests an initial copy of an exposure record, related analysis or new information added to the record:
– A copy of the record is provided without cost to the employee or their representative or
– The facilities are made available for copying without cost to the employee or their representative or
– The record is loaned to the employee or their representative for a reasonable time to enable a copy to be made.
Note:
Whenever a record has been previously provided without cost to an employee or designated representative, and they request additional copies, the employer may charge reasonable, nondiscriminatory administrative costs (e.g., search and copying expenses, but no overhead expenses).
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-18015, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-18015, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-18015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-18020
Transfer records when ceasing to do business.

You must:
• Transfer all material safety data sheets (MSDSs) as exposure records to the successor employer, who must do the following to these records:
– Received
– Preserve
– Keep unchanged
• If there is no successor to receive and preserve the employee exposure records:
– Notify affected current employees of their rights of access to records at least 3 months prior to the cessation of the employer's business
and
– Transfer the records to the department, if required by a specific WISHA safety and health rule.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-18020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-18020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-190
Summary/rule.

Your responsibility: To provide a safety bulletin board.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-190, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-19005
Provide a safety bulletin board in your workplace.

You must:
• Install and maintain a safety bulletin board in every fixed workplace (establishment) that has eight or more employees. Make sure the safety bulletin board is large enough to post information such as the following:
– Safety bulletins
– Safety newsletters
– Safety posters
– Accident statistics
– Other safety educational material.
Note:
You may want to post your emergency phone numbers on the safety bulletin board.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-19005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-200
WISHA poster.

Your responsibility: To post the WISHA poster, which informs your employees of their job safety and health protection rights.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-200, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-20005
Post and keep a WISHA poster in your workplace.

You must:
• Post it where it can easily be seen by employees and keep it in good condition.
Note:
• Other programs within labor and industries may require other workplace posters. These are:
 
– Job safety and health protection
 
AND
 
– Notice to employeesIf a job injury occurs
 
AND
 
– Your rights as a nonagricultural worker
 
• You can obtain a free copy of labor and industries posters from any labor and industries office or by printing it off our web site (http://www.lni.wa.gov/ipub/ 101-054-000.htm). You can find the labor and industries office closest to you by:
 
• Checking the resource section of this book for regional offices.
 
OR
 
– Calling 1-800-4BE SAFE ( 1-800-423-7233)
 
OR
 
http://www.lni.wa.gov/wisha/question.htm#contact.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-20005, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-20005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-20005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-210
Lighting.

Your responsibility: To provide and maintain adequate lighting in your workplace.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-210, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-21005
Provide and maintain adequate lighting.

Note:
This section establishes minimal levels of lighting for safety purposes only. Guidelines pertaining to optimal levels of lighting and illumination may be found in Practice for Industrial Lighting, ANSI/IES RP7-1979. (See the resource section of this book on how to contact ANSI.)
You must:
• Provide and maintain adequate lighting for all work activities in your workplace. See the following table.
Lighting Table
Activity
Minimum
acceptable
average
lighting
level in
an area:
Any one single
measurement
used to
determine the
average lighting
level* cannot be
less than:
 
(Foot-candles)
(Foot-candles)
Indoor task
10
5
Outdoor task
5
2.5
Nontask activities for both indoor and outdoor
3
1.5
*
Lighting levels must be measured at thirty inches above the floor/working surface at the task.
You must:
• Have adequate light for employees to see nearby objects that might be potential hazards or to see to operate emergency controls or other equipment, if general lighting is not available.
Note:
• Lighting levels can be measured with a light meter.
 
• Conversion information: 1 foot-candleEhard = 1 lumen incident per square foot = 10.76 lux.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-21005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-21005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-220
Housekeeping, drainage, and storageSummary.

Your responsibility: To provide your employees with a clean, dry, pest-free workplace.
Note:
The introduction has important information about building, electrical and fire codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to building, fire, and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
You must:
Housekeeping
Keep your workplace clean.
Sweep and clean your workplace to minimize dust.
Keep your workplace free of obstacles that interfere with cleaning.
Control pests in your workplace.
Make sure floors are maintained in a safe condition.
Drainage
Keep your workroom floors dry, when practical.
Provide proper drainage.
Storage areas
Store things safely.
Control vegetation in your storage areas.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-220, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22005
Keep your workplace clean.

You must:
• Keep all areas of you workplace, passageways, storage rooms, and service rooms in a clean, orderly and sanitary condition to the extent the nature of the work allows.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22010
Sweep and clean your workplace to minimize dust.

You must:
• Sweep and clean your workplace in a way that minimizes dust in the air as much as possible.
• When practical, clean after hours so that your employees are not exposed to dust in the air on the job.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22015
Keep your workplace free of obstacles that interfere with cleaning.

You must:
• Keep your workplace clear of obstructions such as nails, splinters, loose boards and unnecessary holes and openings to make cleaning easier and more effective.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22020
Control pests in your workplace.

You must:
• Make sure each building in your workplace is constructed, equipped and maintained so it restricts pests from entering or living in it. Pests include animals such as:
– Rodents (rats, mice, and squirrels)
– Birds (starlings, pigeons, and swallows)
– Insects (bees, wasps, and mosquitoes)
• Take steps to effectively control pests in your workplace, if they are detected.
– Carry out a continuing and effective control program in the areas of your workplace where pests have been detected.
Note:
• By handling dead or live pests including their waste products, attached parasites and other contaminated materials, your employees may be exposed to certain health risks. These risks include, but are not limited to: Hanta virus, rabies, lyme disease and psittacosis. Contact your local L&I office (see resource section of this book) or the public health department for more information about health risks and proper pest handling and disposal techniques.
• "Workplace" includes storage areas.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-22020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22022
Make sure floors are maintained in a safe condition.

You must:
• Make sure floors are kept free of debris. This includes:
– Buildings
– Platforms
– Walkways and driveways
– Storage yards
– Docks
• Use a nonslip coating on all polished floors.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22022, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22025
Keep your workroom floors dry, when practical.

You must:
• Do the following to help keep your employees dry if wet processes are used in your work area:
– Maintain drainage away from the work area; and
– Provide false floors, platforms, or other dry places where employees can stand, where practical, or
– Provide appropriate waterproof footgear.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22030
Provide proper drainage.

You must:
• Provide all areas where employees work, such as yards, basements, or garages, with adequate drainage.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22035
Store things safely.

You must:
• Store materials so they do not create a hazard.
• Keep workplace storage areas free from accumulation of materials that could create hazards from tripping, fire, or explosion.
• Secure stored items such as bundles, containers, and bags to prevent them from falling, sliding, or collapsing by doing one or more of the following:
– Stacking
– Racking
– Blocking
– Interlocking
– Otherwise securing them
• Make sure stored items are limited in height so that they are stable and secure to prevent sliding or collapse.
Examples of Proper Material Storage
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-22040
Control vegetation in your storage areas.

You must:
• Control vegetation in your storage areas when necessary to create a safe working environment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-22040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-230
Summary.

Your responsibility:
To provide safe drinking (potable) water, bathrooms, washing facilities, eating areas and garbage and waste disposal in your workplace.
You must:
General requirements for all workplaces.
Drinking water
Provide safe drinking (potable) water in your workplace.
Clearly mark water outlets that are not fit for drinking (nonpotable).
Make sure systems delivering not fit for drinking (nonpotable) water prevent backflow into drinking water systems.
Bathrooms and washing facilities
Provide bathrooms for your employees.
Provide convenient, clean washing facilities.
Eating areas and food service
Make sure eating areas are safe and healthy.
Follow these requirements if you provide food service to your employees.
Garbage and waste disposal
Dispose of garbage and waste safely.
Remove garbage and waste in a way that does not create a health hazard.
Lunchrooms and personal service rooms
Provide a separate lunchroom if employees are exposed to toxic substances if they are allowed to eat and drink on the job site.
Provide showers when required for employees working with chemicals.
Provide change rooms when required.
Make sure any work clothes you provide are dry.
Note:
Some industries may have additional rules on bathrooms and washing facilities. Some examples include:
Industry
WAC
Agriculture; indoor sanitation and temporary labor camps
chapter 296-307 WAC
Carcinogens; general regulated area requirements
Charter boats
Compressed air work
WAC 296-36-160(5)
Construction
Temporary labor camps
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-230, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-230, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-230, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23005
Provide safe drinking (potable) water in your workplace.

You must:
(1) Provide safe drinking (potable) water for employees for:
• Washing themselves
• Personal service rooms
• Cooking
• Washing premises where food is prepared or processed
• Washing food, eating utensils, or clothing
(2) Make sure when providing movable or portable drinking water dispensers that they are:
• Capable of being closed
• Kept in sanitary condition
• Equipped with a tap
(3) Prohibit employees from:
• Using shared drinking cups or utensils.
• Using open containers such as barrels, pails, and tanks that require employees to dip or pour drinking water, even if the containers have covers.
Definition:
• Potable water is water that you can safely drink that meets specific safety standards prescribed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency's National Interim Primary Drinking Water Regulations, published in 40 C.F.R. Part 141, and 40 C.F.R. 147.2400.
• Personal service rooms are used for activities not directly connected with a business' production or service function such as first aid, medical services, dressing, showering, bathrooms, washing and eating.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23005, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-23005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23010
Clearly mark the water outlets that are not fit for drinking (nonpotable).

You must:
(1) Mark water outlets that are not fit for drinking (nonpotable), such as those used for industrial processes or firefighting, so they will not be used for:
• Drinking
• Washing themselves, except in emergencies
• Cooking
• Washing food, eating utensils, or clothing.
(2) Prohibit the use of nonpotable water containing substances that could create unsafe conditions such as:
• Concentrations of chemicals, such as lead or chlorine
• Fecal coliform bacteria.
Note:
As long as the nonpotable water is free of substances that could create unsafe conditions, the water can be used for cleaning both:
 
-Work premises used for activities other than food preparation or processing
 
and
 
–Personal service rooms, such as bathrooms.
Reference:
You may need to follow additional requirements for emergency washing facilities. See WAC 296-800-150 First aid, for more information.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23010, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-23010, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-23010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23015
Make sure that systems delivering not-fit-for-drinking (nonpotable) water prevent backflow into drinking water systems.

You must:
• Make sure that systems delivering not-fit-for-drinking (nonpotable) water prevent backflow into drinking water systems.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23020
Provide bathrooms for your employees.

Exemption:
You do not have to provide bathrooms:
 
For mobile crews or at work locations not normally attended by employees, if there is transportation immediately available to nearby bathrooms that meet the requirements of this section.
You must:
(1) Provide bathrooms with the appropriate number of toilets for your employees at every workplace based on Table 1.
• Have an appropriate number of toilets for each gender, based on the number of male and female employees at your workplace.
– For example, if you have thirty-seven men and seventeen women, you need to have three toilets for the men and two toilets for the women, based on Table 1.
• Make sure each toilet is in a separate compartment with a door and walls or partitions for privacy.
Table 1
Required Number of Employee Toilets at
Every Workplace
Maximum Number of Employees Present at Any One Time During a Shift
Minimum Number of Toilets Required
1 to 15
1
16 to 35
2
36 to 55
3
56 to 80
4
81 to 110
5
111 to 150
6
Over 150
One additional toilet for each additional 40 employees
Note:
A shared bathroom (multiple toilets without enclosures) counts as one toilet no matter how many toilets it contains. In bathrooms used only by men, urinals may be substituted for up to 1/3 of the required toilets.
You must:
(2) Provide toilet paper and a toilet paper roll holder for each toilet.
(3) Make sure bathrooms are maintained in a clean and sanitary condition.
(4) Make sure the sewage disposal method does not endanger the health of employees.
Exemption:
Separate bathrooms for men and women are not required if the bathroom:
 
• Will only be occupied by one person at a time.
 
• Can be locked from the inside.
 
• Contains at least one toilet.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23020, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-23020, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23025
Provide convenient and clean washing facilities.

Exemption:
You do not have to provide washing facilities for:
 
• Mobile crews or work locations not normally attended by employees, if there is immediately available transportation to nearby washing facilities that meet the requirements of this rule.
You must:
• Provide convenient and clean washing facilities for employees including:
– Sinks or basins for personal washing
– Hot and cold water, or lukewarm (tepid), running water in each sink and basin
– Hand soap or similar cleaning agents
– One of the following:
• Individual paper or cloth hand towels
• Individual sections of clean continuous cloth toweling
• Air blowers for drying hands, located near the sinks and basins.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-24-071, § 296-800-23025, filed 12/4/12, effective 1/4/13. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23025, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-23025, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-23025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-23040
Make sure eating areas are safe and healthy.

You must:
(1) Make sure employees are not allowed to eat and drink in:
• Bathrooms.
• Areas exposed to toxic substances.
(2) Make sure food is not stored in bathrooms or areas exposed to toxic substances.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23040, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23045
Follow these requirements if you provide food service to your employees.

You must:
• Make sure all food service facilities and operations you make available follow sound hygiene principles.
• Make sure the food is:
– Unspoiled.
– Protected from contamination during processing, preparation, handling, and storage.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23045, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23050
Dispose of garbage and waste safely.

You must:
(1) Make sure garbage containers are:
• Kept in a clean and sanitary condition.
• Made from smooth, corrosion resistant materials.
• Easily cleaned or are disposable.
• Equipped with a solid tight-fitting cover unless you can keep them in a sanitary condition without a cover.
(2) Provide enough garbage containers to make sure they:
• Are conveniently located to encourage their use.
• Won't be overfilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23050, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23055
Remove garbage and waste in a way that does not create a health hazard.

You must:
• Remove all sweepings, solid and liquid wastes, refuse, and garbage as often as needed to keep the workplace in a sanitary condition.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23055, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23060
Provide a separate lunchroom if employees are exposed to toxic substances if they are allowed to eat and drink on the job site.

You must:
(1) Provide a lunchroom separate from the work area if employees are exposed to toxic substances.
(2) Use Table 2 to determine the required square footage in your lunchroom based on the number of employees using the room at any one time.
Table 2
Maximum Number of Employees Using Lunchroom at One Time
Number of Persons
Square Feet per Person
25 and less
13
26-74
12
75-149
11
150 and over
10
Note:
You do not have to provide a separate lunchroom if it is convenient for employees to leave the workplace to eat and drink.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23060, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23065
Provide showers when required for employees working with chemicals.

You must:
• Provide showers for employees if:
– They work with chemicals that could cause an occupational illness;
AND
– The chemicals remain on the skin between work shifts.
• Make sure employees who work with such chemicals shower at the end of their shifts.
– Make sure showers have:
• Soap or other cleansing agents.
• Hot and cold water with a common discharge line.
– Provide individual, clean towels for each employee who is required to shower.
• Provide at least one shower for every ten employees (or every fraction of 10) of each gender.
Note:
Table 3 shows the number of showers to provide based on a "fraction of 10."
Table 3
Number of Employees of Each Gender
Number of Showers
  1-10
1
11-20
2
21-30
3
31-40
4
41-50
5
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23065, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23070
Provide change rooms when required.

You must:
• Provide change rooms when employees are required by a particular standard to wear protective clothing because of the possibility of contamination with toxic materials.
• Make sure change rooms have separate storage facilities for street clothes and protective clothing.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23070, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-23075
Make sure any work clothes you provide are dry.

You must:
• Make sure when providing work clothes to employees that the clothing provided is dry if the clothing:
– Gets wet during use;
or
– Is washed before it is reused.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-23075, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03.]



296-800-240
Summary.

Your responsibility: To eliminate exposure to environmental tobacco smoke in your office work environment.
You must:
Prohibit tobacco smoke in your office work environment
Note:
This rule does not preempt any federal, state, municipal, or other local authority's regulation of indoor smoking that is more protective than this section.
Definition:
Office work environment is an indoor or enclosed occupied space where clerical work, administration, or business is carried out. In addition, it includes:
 
• Other workplace spaces controlled by the employer and used by office workers, such as cafeterias, meeting rooms, and washrooms.
 
• Office areas of manufacturing and production facilities, not including process areas.
 
• Office areas of businesses such as food and beverage establishments, agricultural operations, construction, commercial trade, services, etc.
Link:
For work environments outside the office, contact your local health department using the link http://www.secondhandsmokesyou.com or by calling them directly.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 06-22-023, § 296-800-240, filed 10/24/06, effective 12/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-240, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-24005
Prohibit tobacco smoke in your office work environment.

Exemption: The minimum criteria specified in this rule do not apply to outdoor structures provided for smokers such as gazebos or lean-tos that maintain the twenty-five feet distance from entrances, exits, windows that open, and ventilation intakes that serve an enclosed area where smoking is prohibited.
You must:
(1) Prohibit smoking in your office work environment
(2) Use administrative controls to prevent tobacco smoke from entering your office from outside the building.
• Make sure that outside smoking areas used by your employees are at least twenty-five feet from entrances, exits, windows that open, and ventilation intakes that serve an enclosed area where smoking is prohibited.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 06-22-023, § 296-800-24005, filed 10/24/06, effective 12/1/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-24005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-250
Summary.

Your responsibility: To make sure stairs used by employees are safe
You must:
Provide fixed stairs where required
Provide stairs that minimize hazards
Provide handrails and stair railings
Exemptions:
This rule does not apply to:
 
♦ Stairs used exclusively for fire exit purposes
 
♦ Construction operations (See WAC 296-24-76503 for the specifications for the safe design and construction of fixed general industrial stairs.)
 
♦ Private buildings or residences
 
♦ Articulated stairs (for example, stairs used at a marina)
 
♦ Nonindustrial and monumental stairs are excluded as they are not industrial stairs; however, when public and private building steps are located at loading or receiving docks, in maintenance areas, etc., or are used exclusively by employees, the requirements of this rule must apply.
Note:
The introduction has important information about building, electrical and fire codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to building, fire, and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-250, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-250, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-25005
Provide fixed stairs where required.

You must:
• Install fixed stairs where:
– Employees travel between different levels on a predictable and regular basis.
– Access to platforms is required to give routine attention to equipment under operation.
– Daily movement between elevations is required to gauge, inspect, and maintain equipment where those work assignments may expose employees to acids, caustics, gases, or other harmful substances.
– Carrying tools or equipment by hand is a normal work requirement.
• Not use spiral stairways except as secondary exit routes.
Note:
• You can use fixed ladders for climbing elevated structures, such as tanks, towers, and overhead traveling cranes, when their use is common practice in your industry.
 
• You can use winding stairways on tanks and similar round structures if the structure's diameter is at least five feet.
 
• You could use a spiral stairway as an exit route in a restricted area that lacks room for a conventional stairway.
Definitions:
• A stairway or fixed stairs is a series of steps and landings:
 
– Leading from one level or floor to another.
 
– Leading to platforms, pits, boiler rooms, crossovers, or around machinery, tanks, and other equipment.
 
– Used more or less continuously or routinely by employees or only occasionally by specific individuals.
 
– With three or more risers.
 
• A riser is the vertical part of the step at the back of a tread that rises to the front of the tread above.
 
• A tread is the horizontal part of the step. Tread width is the distance from the front of the tread to the back.
Stair Components
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-25005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-25005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-25010
Provide stairs that minimize hazards.

You must:
(1) Make sure stairs have slip-resistant treads.
(2) Make sure that stairs with four or more risers have:
• Railings on the open sides of all exposed stairways and stair platforms
• Handrails on at least one side of closed stairways, preferably on the right side while descending
(3) Provide a platform where doors or gates open directly on a stairway. The swing of the door must not reduce the effective width of the platform to less than 20 inches.
Note:
To see all of the rules for building fixed stairs, refer to WAC 296-24-75011 and 296-24-765 of the General safety and health standard.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-25010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-25015
Provide handrails and stair railings.

Exemption:
Vehicle service pit stairways are exempt from the rules for stairway railing and guards, if they would prevent a vehicle from moving into a position over the pit.
Definition:
• A handrail is a single bar or pipe on brackets from a wall or partition to provide a continuous handhold for persons using a stair.
 
• A stair railing is a vertical barrier attached to a stairway with an open side, to prevent falls. The top surface of the stair railing is used as a handrail.
You must:
• Make sure stairways less than forty-four inches wide have:
– At least one handrail, preferably on your right side as you go down the stairs, if both sides are enclosed.
OR
– At least one stair railing on the open side, if one side is open.
OR
– One stair railing on each side, if both sides are open.
• Make sure stairways more than forty-four inches wide but less than eighty-eight inches wide have:
– One handrail on each enclosed side.
– One stair railing on each open side.
• Make sure stairways at least eighty-eight inches wide have:
– One handrail on each enclosed side.
– One stair railing on each open side.
– One intermediate stair railing located approximately midway of the width.
• Equip winding stairs with a handrail, offset to prevent walking on all portions of the treads, less than six inches wide.
Reference:
Railings must consist of a top rail, intermediate rail, and posts. To see all of the rules for building handrails and stairway railings, refer to WAC 296-24-75011, of the general safety and health standard.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-25015, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-25015, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-25015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-260
Summary.

Your responsibility: To safely guard floor openings, floor holes, and open-sided floors in your workplace.
You must:
Guard or cover floor openings and floor holes.
Protect open-sided floors and platforms.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-260, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-26005
Guard or cover floor openings and floor holes.

Definition:
A floor opening is an opening in any floor, platform, pavement, or yard that measures at least twelve inches in its smallest dimension and through which a person can fall.
 
Examples of floor openings are:
 
• Hatchways
 
• Stair or ladder openings
 
• Pits
 
• Large manholes.
 
The following are not considered floor openings:
 
• Openings occupied by elevators
 
• Dumbwaiters
 
• Conveyors
 
• Machinery
 
• Containers
 
A floor hole is an opening in any floor, platform, pavement, or yard that measures at least one inch but less than twelve inches at its smallest dimension and through which materials and tools (but not people) can fall.
 
Examples of floor holes are:
 
• Belt holes
 
• Pipe openings
 
• Slot openings
You must:
(1) Guard stairway floor openings, temporary floor openings and floor holes.
• Protect all stairway floor openings with a railing. The railing must protect all open sides except the stairway entrance side.
 
• Use a hinged cover and a removable railing where traffic across an infrequently used stairway floor opening prevents the installation of a fixed railing. This removable railing must protect all open sides except the stairway entrance side.
• Protect temporary floor openings by either a railing or by a person who constantly attends the opening.
• Protect exposed floor holes into which a person can accidentally walk by either:
– A railing with a toeboard on all open sides or
– A floor hole cover of standard strength and construction that can be hinged in place. When a floor hole cover is not in place, the hole must be protected by a removable railing or constantly attended by someone.
• Provide covers for floor openings. Floor opening covers may be of any material that has a safety factor of four, or is strong enough to hold up to four times the intended load. Covers that do not project more than one inch above the floor level may be used providing all edges are beveled (slanted) to prevent tripping. All hinges, handles, bolts, or other parts of a cover must set flush with the floor or cover surface.
 
(2) Prevent tools and materials from falling through a floor hole. The floor hole must be protected by a cover that leaves an opening no more than one inch wide and is securely held in place. This applies only to floor holes that persons cannot accidentally walk into on account of fixed machinery, equipment, or walls.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-26005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-26010
Protect open-sided floors and platforms.

 
You must:
(1) Guard open-sided floors and platforms.
• Guard open-sided floors and platforms four feet or more above adjacent floor or ground level by a railing. The entrance to a ramp, stairway, or fixed ladder does not need a railing.
• Guard open-sided floors, walkways and platforms above or adjacent to dangerous equipment, pickling or galvanizing tanks, degreasing units, and other similar hazards, regardless of height with a railing and toeboard.
(2) Make sure tools and loose materials are not left on overhead platforms and scaffolds.
Note:
• Where the guarding rules above do not apply because employees exposure to falls is infrequent (not on a predictable and regular basis), you must comply with the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) rules (WAC 296-800-160) or other effective fall protection must be provided.
 
• You can find the minimum requirements for standard railings of various types of construction in WAC 296-24-75011.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-26010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-26010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-270
Summary.

Your responsibility: To make sure that the buildings, floors, and other structures in your workplace are safe, well-built, and not overloaded
You must:
Not overload floors or roofs
Make sure that floors are safe
Make sure floors can support equipment that moves or has motion
Post approved load limits (weight limits) for floors
Note:
The introduction has important information about fire, building and electrical codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to fire, building and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-270, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-27005
Do not overload floors or roofs.

You must:
• Prohibit overloading roofs and floors of any building or other structure with more weight than is approved by the building official.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-27005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-27010
Make sure that floors are safe.

You must:
• Make sure that floors including their parts and structural members are safe.
• Make sure floors are of substantial construction and kept in good repair. This includes floors of:
– Buildings
– Platforms
– Walks and driveways
– Storage yards
– Docks
• Make sure that structures are designed, constructed, and maintained to provide a safety factor of 4 times the imposed maximum strain.
– If you notice bowing, cracking, or other indications of excessive strain on a structure, you must take action to make sure it is safe.
Note:
This rule applies to all buildings or those that have had complete or major changes or repairs built after 5/7/74.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-27010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-27015
Make sure floors can support equipment that moves or has motion.

You must:
• Make sure flooring of buildings, ramps, docks, trestles and other fixed structures that supports equipment that moves or has motion such as vibration, must not be less than two and one-half inch material.
Note:
Where flooring is covered by steel floor plates, 2-inch material may be used.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-27015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-27020
Post approved load limits (weight limits) for floors.

You must:
• Post approved load limits (weight limits) for floors used for mercantile, business, industrial or storage purposes in an obvious place.
• As the owner, or owner's agent, of a building (or other part of a workplace) post the load approved by the building official by:
– Supplying and affixing a durable metal sign that is marked with the approved load.
– Placing the metal sign in an obvious spot in the space to which it applies.
– Replacing the metal sign if it is lost, defaced, damaged, or removed.
Note:
This rule applies to the floor that supports shelving, but not to the shelves themselves.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-27020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-27020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-280
Basic electrical rules.

Summary. Your responsibility: To protect your employees from hazards when working with electrical equipment, tools, and appliances.
You must:
Inspect all electrical equipment your employees use to make sure the equipment is safe.
Make sure all electrical equipment is used for its approved or listed purpose.
Make sure electrical equipment used or located in wet or damp locations is designed for such use.
Make sure electrical equipment that is not marked by the manufacturer cannot be used.
Identify disconnecting means.
Maintain electrical fittings, boxes, cabinets, and outlets in good condition.
Maintain all flexible cords and cables in good condition and use safely.
Guard electrical equipment to prevent your employees from electrical hazards.
Make sure electrical equipment is effectively grounded.
Make sure electrical equipment has overcurrent protection.
Exemptions:
•These rules apply to all electrical equipment used in the workplace, except for:
 
– Electrical installations and equipment on ships, watercraft, railway rolling stock, aircraft and all automotive vehicles other than mobile homes and recreational vehicles.
 
– Electrical installations and equipment used to generate, transmit, transform or distribute power exclusively for operation of rolling stock.
 
– Electrical installations of railways used exclusively for signaling and communication purposes.
 
– Installations underground in mines.
 
– Installations of communication equipment under the exclusive control of communications utilities, located outdoors or in building spaces used exclusively for such installations.
 
– Installations controlled and used exclusively by electric utilities for:
 
■ Communication or metering purposes; or
 
■ Generating, controlling, transforming, transmitting and distributing electric energy that are located:
 
♦ In buildings used exclusively by the utility for such purposes; or
 
♦ Outdoors on property owned or leased by the utility; or
 
♦ On public highways, streets and roads; or
 
♦ Outdoors by established rights on private property.
Note:
• The introduction has important information about fire, building and electrical codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to fire, building and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
 
• These rules guide how electrical equipment is used and maintained in your workplace. They should not be used in place of your local electrical codes if you are installing electrical wiring, electrical circuits or electrical distribution equipment.
 
• This rule applies to 600 volts or less. Requirements for specific equipment or special installation are found in chapter 296-24 WAC, Part L.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-280, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-280, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-280, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28005
Inspect all electrical equipment your employees use to make sure the equipment is safe.

You must:
• Inspect electrical equipment to make sure there are no recognized hazards likely to cause death or serious physical harm to employees. Determine the safety of the equipment by considering the following:
Suitability for installation and use as evidenced by:
– Approved or listed by a recognized testing laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratories (UL) or other approving agency.
– Labeled or listed for the purpose it is being used.
– Mechanical strength and durability, including the adequacy of the protection provided by parts designed to enclose and protect other equipment.
– Wire-bending and connection space.
– Electrical insulation.
– Heating effects under all conditions of use.
– Arcing effects.
– Classification by type, size, voltage, current capacity, and specific use.
– Other factors that contribute to the practical safeguarding of persons using or likely to come in contact with the equipment.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28005, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28010
Make sure all electrical equipment is used for its approved or listed purpose.

Definitions:
• Electrical outlets are places on an electric circuit where power is supplied to equipment through receptacles, sockets and outlets for attachment plugs.
 
• Receptacles are outlets that accept a plug to supply electric power to equipment through a cord or cable.
You must:
• Make sure electrical outlets have an ampere rating that is not less than the electrical load to be served.
• Make sure the proper mating configuration exists when connecting the attachment plug to a receptacle.
• Make sure electrical outlets, cord connectors, attachment plugs and receptacles will not accept an attachment plug with a different voltage or current rating than that for which the device is intended.
Note:
A 20-ampere T-slot receptacle or cord connector may accept a 15-ampere attachment plug of the same voltage rating.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28010, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28015
Make sure electrical equipment used or located in wet or damp locations is designed for such use.

You must:
• Make sure fixtures and receptacles located in wet or damp locations are approved for such use. They must be constructed or installed so that water cannot enter or accumulate in wireways, lampholders, or other electrical parts.
• Make sure cabinets, cutout boxes, fittings, boxes, and panelboard enclosures in damp or wet locations are:
– Installed to prevent moisture or water from entering and accumulating inside.
– Mounted so there is at least a 1/4 inch airspace between the enclosure and the wall or other supporting surface. Nonmetallic enclosures may be installed on a concrete, masonry, tile, or similar surface without the airspace.
– Weatherproof when used in wet locations.
Switches, circuit breakers, and switchboards located in wet locations must be in weatherproof enclosures.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28015, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28020
Make sure electrical equipment that is not marked is not used.

You must:
• Electric equipment may not be used unless the following markings have been placed on the equipment:
– The manufacturer's name, trademark, or other descriptive marking by which the organization responsible for the product may be identified;
AND
– Voltage, current and wattage, or other ratings as necessary.
• Make sure markings are durable and appropriate to the environment.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28020, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28022
Identify disconnecting means.

You must:
• Make sure the disconnecting means (such as on/off switches and circuit breakers) is marked to show when it is open and closed and what equipment it controls, unless located and arranged so the purpose is obvious.
• Install the disconnecting means at a readily accessible location nearest the point of entrance of the service-entrance conductors.
• Make sure the disconnecting means for each motor and appliance is marked, at the disconnecting means or overcurrent device, to show when the circuit is open and closed and what circuit it controls, unless located and arranged so the purpose is obvious.
• Make sure each service, feeder and branch circuit is marked, at its disconnecting means or overcurrent device, to show when the circuit is open and closed and what circuit it controls, unless located and arranged so the purpose is obvious.
• Make sure markings are durable and appropriate to the environment.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28022, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28022, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28025
Maintain electrical fittings, boxes, cabinets and outlets in good condition.

You must:
Do the following when using covers and openings:
• When conductors enter boxes, cabinets, or fittings:
– Protect the conductor (wires) from abrasion.
– Effectively close the openings where conductors enter.
– Effectively close all unused openings.
• Provide pull boxes, junction boxes, and fittings with covers approved for the purpose.
• Make sure each outlet box has a cover, faceplate, or fixture canopy in completed installations.
• Make sure covers for outlet boxes with openings for flexible cord pendants have bushings to protect the cord, or have a smooth and well rounded surface where the cord touches the opening.
• Ground metal covers.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28025, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28025, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28027
Working space around electrical equipment.

This section applies to equipment that operates at 600 volts or less.
(1) Provide and maintain sufficient access and working space around all electrical equipment to permit ready and safe operation and maintenance of the equipment.
(2) Make sure equipment likely to require examination, adjustment, servicing, or maintenance while energized has:
• Working space in front of the equipment that is equal to the width of the equipment or thirty inches, whichever is greater.
• Sufficient working space to permit equipment doors or hinged panels to open at least 90 degrees.
• Working space in the direction of access to live parts that is not less than that listed in Table XX. Distances are measured from the live parts if they are exposed or from the enclosure front or opening if they are enclosed.
• Clear working space about service equipment, switchboards, panelboards, or motor control centers that extends from the grade, floor, or platform to a height of:
– 6.25 feet for installations built before August 13, 2007.
– 6.5 feet for installations built on or after August 13, 2007. If the height of the equipment is greater than 6.5 feet, the minimum headroom may not be less than the height of the equipment.
Note:
• Other equipment associated with the electrical installation and located above or below the electric equipment may extend not more than 6 inches beyond the front of the electric equipment.
(3) Make sure working space is:
• Not used for storage.
• Suitably guarded when normally enclosed live parts are exposed for inspection or servicing in a passageway or general open space.
(4) Provide at least one entrance of sufficient area to give access to the working space about electric equipment.
(5) Provide adequate lighting (WAC 296-800-210) for all working spaces about service equipment, switchboards, panelboards, and motor control centers installed indoors. In electric equipment rooms, the illumination must not be controlled by automatic means only.
• This table shows the area you must keep clear depending on the layout of the electrical equipment.
Table XX
Conditions2
Minimum Clear Distance3
Minimum Clear Distance3
 
0 - 150
volts to ground
151 - 600
volts to ground
 
A1
 
3 ft.
 
3 ft.
 
B
 
3 ft.1
 
3 1/2 ft.
 
C
 
3 ft.
 
4 ft.
1.
Minimum clear distances may be 0.7 m (2.5 ft) for installations built before April 16, 1981.
2.
Conditions A, B, and C are as follows:
 
A = Exposed live parts on one side and no live or grounded parts on the other side of the working space, or exposed live parts on both sides effectively guarded by suitable wood or other insulating material. Insulated wire or insulated bus bars operating at not over 300 volts aren't considered live parts.
 
B = Exposed live parts on one side and grounded parts on the other side.
 
C = Exposed live parts on both sides of the workspace (not guarded as provided in condition A with the operator between the panels).
3.
Working space is not required in back of assemblies such as dead-front switchboards or motor control centers where there are no renewable or adjustable parts (such as fuses or switches) on the back and where all connections are accessible from locations other than the back. Where rear access is required to work on deenergized parts on the back of enclosed equipment, a minimum working space of 30 in. horizontally shall be provided.
 
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28027, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12.]



296-800-28030
Maintain all flexible cords and cables in good condition and use safely.

Exemption:
These rules do not apply to cords and cables that are an internal part of factory assembled appliances and equipment, like the windings on motors or wiring inside electrical panels.
Note:
Flexible cords and cables are typically used to connect electrical equipment to a power source. These cords can have an electrical plug to connect to a power source or can be permanently wired into the power source. The terms flexible cords, extension cord, cables and electrical cords all refer to a type of flexible cord.
You must:
(1) Perform visual inspections.
• On portable cord- and plug-connected equipment and extension cords before use on each work shift. Defects and damage to look for include:
– Loose parts.
– Deformed or missing pins.
– External defects and damage.
– Damage to the outer covering or insulation.
– Pinched or crushed covering or insulation that might indicate internal damage.
Exemption:
You do not need to visually inspect portable cord- and plug-connected equipment and extension cords that stay connected once in place and are not exposed to damage until they are moved.
You must:
• Remove from service any defective or damaged cord until repaired and tested.
(2) Use.
• Use flexible cords only as follows:
– Wiring of equipment and appliances.
– Data processing cables approved as a part of the data processing system.
– Pendants.
– Wiring for fixtures.
– Connecting portable lamps or appliances to an approved outlet with an attachment plug.
– Connecting stationary equipment that is frequently changed with an attachment plug energized from an approved outlet.
– Preventing noise or vibration transmission.
– Appliances where the fastening means and mechanical connections are designed to permit removal for maintenance and repair if the appliance is equipped with an attachment plug energized from an approved outlet.
– Elevator cables.
– Wiring of cranes and hoists.
– Portable and mobile signs.
– Connection of moving parts.
Common Acceptable Uses of Flexible Cords
 
Note:
Extension cords (flexible cord sets) may be used on a temporary basis if you follow the rules described in the temporary use section, WAC 296-800-28030(3).
You must:
• Make sure flexible cords are NOT:
– Used as a substitute for fixed wiring of a structure.
– Run through holes in walls, ceilings, or floors.
– Run through doorways, windows, or similar openings.
– Attached to building surfaces.
– Concealed behind building walls, ceilings, or floors.
– Used to raise or lower equipment.
• Make sure flexible cords and cables are approved and suitable for:
– The way they will be used.
– The location where they will be used.
• Do not fasten or hang cords and equipment in any way that could cause damage to the outer jacket or insulation of the cord.
• Make sure insulation on flexible cords and cables is intact.
• Make sure flexible cords and electrical cords are:
– Connected to devices and fittings so that any pulling force on the cord is prevented from being directly transmitted to joints or terminal screws on the plug.
– Used only in continuous lengths without splice or tap.
Note:
Hard service flexible cords No. 12 or larger may be repaired or spliced if the insulation, outer sheath properties, and use characteristics of the cord are retained.
• Prohibit your employees from using wet hands to plug or unplug equipment or extension cords if the equipment is energized.
(3) Provide the following for temporary use.
• Make sure temporary electrical power and lighting installations that operate at 600 volts or less are used only:
– During and for remodeling, maintenance, repair or demolition of buildings, structures, or equipment, and similar activities.
– For experimental or developmental work.
– During emergencies.
– For no more than ninety days for:
♦ Christmas decorative lighting.
♦ Carnivals.
♦ Other similar purposes.
• Make sure flexible cords and cables are protected from accidental damage as might be caused, for example, by sharp corners, projections, and doorways or other pinch points.
• Remove temporary wiring immediately upon completion of the project or purpose for which the wiring was installed.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28030, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28030, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28035
Guard electrical equipment to prevent your employees from electrical hazards.

You must:
(1) Guard live parts of electric equipment operating at 50 volts or more against accidental contact by any of the following means:
• By approved cabinets or other forms of approved enclosures.
• By location in a room, vault, or similar enclosure that is accessible only to employees qualified to work on the equipment. Entrances to rooms and other guarded locations containing exposed live parts must be marked with conspicuous warning signs forbidding unqualified persons to enter.
• By permanent, substantial partitions or screens so that only employees qualified to work on the equipment will have access within reach of the live parts. Any openings must prevent accidental contact with live parts by employees or objects employees carry.
• By location on a balcony, gallery, or platform that will exclude unqualified persons.
• By being located eight feet or more above the floor or other working surface.
(2) Make sure all electrical appliances, fixtures, lampholders, lamps, rosettes, and receptacles do not have live parts normally exposed to employee contact.
– Rosettes and cleat type lampholders at least 8 feet above the ground may have exposed parts.
(3) In locations where electric equipment would be exposed to physical damage, enclosures or guards must be so arranged and of such strength as to prevent such damage.
Live Parts Guarded by Distance
 
(4) Mark entrances to rooms and other guarded locations containing exposed live parts with conspicuous warning signs forbidding unqualified persons to enter.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28035, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28040
Make sure electrical equipment is effectively grounded.

You must:
• Make sure the path to ground from circuits, equipment, and enclosures is permanent, continuous, and effective.
• Make sure exposed noncurrent-carrying metal parts of cord- and plug-connected equipment that may become energized are grounded under any of the following conditions:
– If operated at over 150 volts to ground, except for guarded motors and metal frames of electrically heated appliances if the appliance frames are permanently and effectively insulated from ground.
− If the equipment is of the following types:
– Hand-held motor-operated tools.
– Stationary and fixed motor-operated tools.
– Light industrial motor-operated tools.
– Refrigerators.
– Freezers.
– Air conditioners.
– Clothes washers and dryers.
– Dishwashers.
– Electrical aquarium equipment.
– Sump pumps.
– Hedge clippers.
– Electric lawn mowers.
– Electric snow blowers.
– Wet scrubbers.
– Tools likely to be used in damp or wet locations.
– Appliances used by employees standing on the ground, on metal floors or working inside of metal tanks or boilers.
– Portable hand lamps.
– Portable and mobile X-ray and associated equipment.
– Tools likely to be used in wet and conductive locations.
Note:
Grounding can be achieved by using tools and appliances equipped with an equipment grounding conductor (three-prong plug and grounded electrical system).
 
You must:
• Make sure exposed metal parts of fixed equipment that do not conduct electricity, but may become energized, are grounded under any of the following conditions:
– If the equipment is in a wet or damp location and is not isolated.
– If within 8 feet vertically or 5 feet horizontally of ground or grounded metal objects and subject to employee contact.
– If in electrical contact with metal.
– If in a hazardous (classified) location.
– If supplied by a metal-clad, metal-sheathed, or grounded metal raceway wiring method.
– If equipment operates with any terminal at over 150 volts to ground.
• Make sure a conductor used as a grounded conductor is identifiable and distinguishable from all other conductors.
• Make sure a conductor used as an equipment grounding conductor is identifiable and distinguishable from all other conductors.
• Make sure grounded conductors are not attached to any terminal or lead so as to reverse polarity of the electrical outlet or receptacle. See illustration - Examples of wiring.
• Make sure grounding terminals or grounding-type devices on receptacles, cords, connectors, or attachments plugs are not used for purposes other than grounding.
EXAMPLES OF WIRING
 
CORRECT WIRING
 
INCORRECT WIRING
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28040, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-28040, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-28040, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-28045
Make sure electrical equipment has overcurrent protection.

You must:
• Make sure all electrical circuits that are rated at 600 volts or less have overcurrent protection.
• Protect conductors and equipment from overcurrent according to their ability to safely conduct electrical current.
• Make sure overcurrent devices do not interrupt the continuity of grounded conductors unless all conductors are opened at the same time, except for motor running overload protection.
– Locate or shield fuses and circuit breakers so that employees will not be burned or otherwise injured by their operation.
– Make sure handles or levers of circuit breakers, and similar parts that may move suddenly in such a way that persons in the vicinity are likely to be injured by being struck by them, are guarded or isolated.
• Make sure the following fuses and thermo cutouts have disconnecting means:
– All cartridge fuses accessible to nonqualified persons.
– All fuses in circuits over 150 volts to ground.
– All thermal cutouts on circuits over 150 volts to ground.
• The disconnecting means must be installed so you can disconnect the fuses or thermal cutouts without disrupting service to equipment and circuits unrelated to those protected by the overcurrent device.
• Provide easy access to overcurrent devices for each employee or authorized building management personnel.
• Locate overcurrent devices:
– Away from easily ignitable material.
– Where they are not exposed to physical damage.
• Make sure circuit breakers clearly indicate whether they are open (off) or closed (on).
• Install circuit breakers that operate vertically so the handle is in the "up" position when the breaker is closed (on).
– Circuit breakers used as switches in 120-volt, fluorescent lighting circuits must be approved for that purpose and marked "SWD."
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-16-064, § 296-800-28045, filed 7/31/12, effective 9/1/12. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-28045, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-28045, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-300
SummaryPortable fire extinguishers.

Important:
The following WISHA rule applies to the placement, use, maintenance, and testing of portable fire extinguishers provided for the use of employees. Your local fire marshal also enforces fire codes which address fire safety that are more comprehensive and may go beyond WISHA rules.
Your responsibility:
To provide readily accessible, appropriate portable fire extinguishers for employees in your workplace
You must:
Provide portable fire extinguishers in your workplace
Select and distribute portable fire extinguishers in your workplace
Make sure that portable fire extinguishers are kept fully charged, in good operating condition, and left in their designated places
Inspect and test all portable fire extinguishers
Train your employees to use portable fire extinguishers
Exemptions:
• You are exempt from the requirements of portable fire extinguishers if you have the following:
– A written fire safety policy that requires the immediate and total evacuation of employees from the workplace when there is a fire alarm signal,
AND
– An emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan which meet the requirements of WAC 296-24-567
AND
– Portable fire extinguishers in your workplace that are not accessible for employee use
• If another WISHA rule requires portable fire extinguishers, then you must comply with these requirements.
• Where extinguishers are provided but are not intended for employee use and you have an emergency action plan and a fire prevention plan (which meet the requirements of WAC 296-24-567), then only the requirements of WAC 296-800-30020 apply.
Note:
The introduction has important information about building, electrical and fire codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to building, fire and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-300, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-300, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-30005
Provide portable fire extinguishers in your workplace.

You must:
(1) Provide approved portable fire extinguishers for your workplace and distribute them so they are readily accessible
• Make sure that your portable fire extinguisher does not use extinguishing agents such as carbon tetrachloride or chlorobromomethane extinguishing agents. In addition, soda-acid foam, loaded stream, antifreeze and water extinguishers of the inverting type shall not be recharged or placed into service.
(2) Mount, locate, and identify portable fire extinguishers so employees can easily reach them, without being subjected to possible injury.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-30005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-30010
Select and distribute portable fire extinguishers in your workplace.

Exemption:
• This does not apply to the portable fire extinguishers provided for employees to use outside of workplace buildings or structures.
– Which designates certain employees to be the only employees authorized to use the available portable fire extinguishers; and
– Requires all other employees in the fire area to immediately evacuate the affected work area upon the sounding of the fire alarm
You must:
• Provide the correct type of portable fire extinguishers and distribute them in your workplace, depending on the type, size, and severity of fire that could occur
– The type of portable fire extinguishers you must have in your workplace depends on the types of fire hazards that exist in your workplace
Fire Extinguisher Distance Table
Type of fire hazard extinguisher
Maximum distance from the fire hazard to a fire extinguisher
Type of fire hazard Wood, cloth, paper, rubber (Class A fire hazards)
No more than 75 feet (22.9 m) Note: You may use uniformly spaced standpipe systems or hose stations instead of Class A portable fire extinguishers, if they meet the requirements of WAC 296-24-602 or 296-24-607.
Liquids, grease, gases (Class B fire hazards)
No more than 50 feet (15.2 m) Note: You may choose to use a smaller fire extinguisher in lieu of that required for the 50 foot distance. If you choose to have the smaller fire extinguisher, the travel distance must not be greater than 30 feet. See UFC Standard 10 Chapter 3 for the basic minimum extinguisher rating allowed.
Live electrical equipment and circuits (Class C fire hazards)
Distribute any Class C portable fire extinguishers the same pattern that you have for any Class A or Class B fire hazards. Note: If the electrical equipment is deenergized, you may use a Class A or Class B portable fire extinguisher.
Powder, flakes, and residue from combustible metals, like magnesium and titanium, that build up over a 2-week period (Class D fire hazards)
No more than 75 feet (22.9 m)
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-30010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-30010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-30015
Make sure that portable fire extinguishers are kept fully charged, in operable condition, and left in their designated places.

You must:
• Make sure that fire extinguishers found with deficiencies are removed from service and replaced with a suitable fire extinguisher.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-30015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-30020
Inspect and test all portable fire extinguishers.

You must:
• Perform inspections:
– Make sure that portable fire extinguishers or hose systems (used instead of fire extinguishers) are visually inspected monthly
• Perform maintenance checks:
– Make sure that all portable fire extinguishers are subjected to an annual maintenance check
– Keep records of all annual maintenance checks and make available to the department upon request
♦ For 1 year after the last maintenance check;
OR
♦ For the life of the shell, whichever is less
– Make sure that equal protection is provided when portable fire extinguishers are removed from service for maintenance and recharging
Exemption: Most stored pressure extinguishers do not require an internal examination. Examples of those that do require an internal examination are those containing a loaded stream agent.
You must:
• Perform hydrostatic testing:
Exemption:
• Dry chemical extinguishers that have nonrefillable disposable containers are exempt from this requirement.
• Manually pressurized pumptanks are exempt from this requirement.
You must:
• Make sure that portable extinguishers are hydrostatically tested:
– At the intervals listed in Table 1, of this section
– Whenever they show evidence of corrosion or mechanical injury
• Not perform hydrostatic testing on fire extinguishers if:
– The unit has been repaired by soldering, welding, brazing, or use of patching compounds
– The cylinder or shell threads are damaged
– Corrosion has caused pitting, including corrosion under removable name plate assemblies
– The extinguisher has been burned in a fire
– Calcium chloride extinguishing agents have been used in a stainless steel shell
Note:
Specific rules regarding conducting hydrostatic tests are covered in WAC 296-24-59212.
You must:
• Maintain records showing that hydrostatic testing has been performed. Provide the following evidence to the department upon request:
– Date of test
– Test pressure used
– The serial number, or other identifier of the fire extinguisher that was tested
– Person or agency performing the test
• Keep records until:
– The extinguisher is retested;
OR
– The extinguisher is taken out of service, whichever comes first
• Empty and maintain stored-pressure dry chemical extinguishers requiring a 12-year hydrostatic test, every six years:
– When recharging or hydrostatic testing is performed, the 6-year requirement begins from that date
Hydrostatic Test Table
Type of Extinguisher
Test Interval (Years)
Stored pressure water and/or antifreeze
5
Wetting agent
5
Foam (stainless steel shell)
5
Aqueous film forming form (AFFF)
5
Loaded stream
5
Dry chemical with stainless steel
5
Carbon dioxide
5
Dry chemical, stored pressure, with mild steel, brazed brass or aluminum shells
12
Halon 1211
12
Halon 1301
12
Dry powder, cartridge or cylinder operated, with mild steel shell
12
Note: Due to a manufacturer's recall, stored pressure water extinguishers with fiberglass shell (pre-1976) are prohibited from hydrostatic testing.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-30020, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-30020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-30025
Train your employees to use portable fire extinguishers.

You must:
• Train your employees where you have provided portable fire extinguisher for their use in:
– The hazards involved with incipient stage firefighting (the early stage of a fire when it can be extinguished by a portable fire extinguisher)
– The general principles of fire extinguisher use
• Provide the training when they are first hired and then annually.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-30025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-310
Summary.

Your responsibility: To provide and maintain emergency exit routes and to install and maintain adequate employee alarm systems.
important:
An employer who demonstrates compliance with the exit route provisions of NFPA 101-2009, the Life Safety Code, will be in compliance with the corresponding requirements of this section.
Exit routes:
You must:
Provide an adequate number of exit routes.
Make sure that exit routes are large enough.
Make sure that exit routes meet their specific design and construction requirements.
Make sure that each exit route leads outside.
Provide unobstructed access to exit routes.
Exit doors must be readily opened from the inside.
Use side-hinged doors to connect rooms to exit routes.
Provide outdoor exit routes that meet requirements.
Minimize danger to employees while they are using emergency exit routes.
Mark exits adequately.
Provide adequate lighting for exit routes and signs.
Maintain the fire retardant properties of paints or other coatings.
Maintain emergency safeguards.
Maintain exit routes during construction and repair.
Provide doors in freezer or refrigerated rooms that open from the inside.
Employee alarm systems:
You must:
Install and maintain an appropriate employee alarm system.
Establish procedures for sounding emergency alarms.
Test the employee alarm system.
Exemption:
This rule does not apply to vehicles, vessels, or other mobile structures.
Note:
The introduction has important information about building, electrical and fire codes that may apply to you in addition to WISHA rules. See "How do the WISHA rules relate to building, fire, and electrical codes" in the introduction section of this book.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-24-071, § 296-800-310, filed 12/4/12, effective 1/4/13. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-18-056, § 296-800-310, filed 9/2/08, effective 11/2/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-310, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-310, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31005
Provide an adequate number of exit routes.

You must:
• Provide a minimum of two exit routes to provide different ways for employees to leave the workplace safely during an emergency (at least two of the exit routes must be remote from one another so employees can safely exit if one exit route becomes blocked or unavailable).
• Provide an adequate number (at least two) of exit routes, considering the kind, number, location and capacity, appropriate to each building according to the following conditions:
– Number of employees
– Size of building
– Arrangement of workplace
– Building occupancy
Note:
A single exit route is permitted where the number of employees, the size of the building, its occupancy, or the arrangement of the workplace indicates that a single exit will allow all employees to exit safely during an emergency. Other means of escape, such as fire exits or accessible windows, should be available where only one exit route is provided.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31010
Make sure that exit routes are large enough.

You must:
• Make sure each exit route is large enough to accommodate the maximum-permitted occupant load for each floor served by the route.
• Make sure the capacity of an exit route does not decrease at any point.
• Make sure the exit route has a minimum ceiling height of 7 feet 6 inches and that no projection from the ceiling is less than 6 feet 8 inches from the floor.
– Objects that stick out into the exit route, such as fans hanging from the ceilings or cabinets on walls, must not reduce the minimum height of the exit route to less than 6 feet 8 inches from the floor.
• Make sure exit routes are at least 28 inches wide at all points between any handrails.
– If necessary, routes must be wider than 28 inches to accommodate the expected occupant load.
– Make sure objects that stick out into the exit route, such as cabinets on walls, do not reduce the minimum width of the exit route.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060, and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 11-04-080, § 296-800-31010, filed 2/1/11, effective 4/1/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-18-056, § 296-800-31010, filed 9/2/08, effective 11/2/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-31010, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31015
Make sure that exit routes meet their specific design and construction requirements.

You must:
• Make sure each exit is a permanent part of the workplace.
• Make sure an exit route has only those openings necessary to permit access to, or exit from, occupied areas of the workplace.
• Make sure any opening into an exit through a fire wall is protected by a self-closing fire door that remains closed.
• Make sure each fire door, its frame, and its hardware is listed or approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory.
• Make sure construction materials, used to separate an exit route, have at least:
– One-hour fire resistance rating if the exit connects three stories or less.
– Two-hour fire resistance rating if the exit connects four stories or more.
• Make sure employees are provided with stairs or a ramp, if the exit route is not substantially level.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31020
Make sure that each exit route leads outside.

You must:
• Make sure that building exit routes lead:
– Directly outside or to a street, walkway, refuge area, or to an open space with access to the outside.
– To streets, walkways, or open spaces large enough to accommodate all building occupants likely to use the exit.
• Make sure the exit routes clearly show the route employees use to leave the building in an emergency.
• Install a standard safeguard with a warning sign, if a doorway or corner of a building could allow an employee to walk in front of an engine or trolley.
• Use doors, partitions, or other effective means to show employees the correct route out of the building, if the stairs in your exit route lead anywhere but out of the building.
Note:
If the stairs in your exit route lead past the exit to the basement, you might install a gate at the point they lead towards that basement. The gate could help your employees stay on the exit route taking them out of the building.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-18-056, § 296-800-31020, filed 9/2/08, effective 11/2/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31025
Provide unobstructed access to exit routes.

You must:
(1) Provide exit routes that are always free of obstructions so all employees can safely exit the building during an emergency.
(2) Make sure employees are not required to travel to a dead end or through a room that can be locked, such as a restroom.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31030
Exit doors must be readily opened from the inside.

Exemption:
An exit door may be locked or blocked from the inside in a mental, penal, or correctional institution, if supervisory personnel are continuously on duty and a plan exists to remove employees and inmates during an emergency.
You must:
• Make sure all exit doors readily open from the inside without keys, tools, or special knowledge. A device that locks only from the outside, such as a panic bar, is permitted. An exit door must be free of any device or alarm that could restrict emergency use of an exit if the device or alarm fails.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31030, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31035
Use side-hinged doors to connect rooms to exit routes.

You must:
• Use a side-hinged exit door to connect any room to an exit route. The door must swing out when the room:
– Is occupied by more than fifty persons or
– Contains highly flammable or explosive materials.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-31035, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31035, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31040
Provide outdoor exit routes that meet these requirements.

You must:
• Make sure an outdoor exit route (such as an interior balcony, porch, gallery, or roof) meets all requirements for an indoor exit route. In addition, an outdoor exit route must also:
– Have guardrails to protect unenclosed sides.
– Be covered if snow or ice is likely to accumulate without regular removal.
– Be reasonably straight with smooth, solid, substantially level floors.
– Have no dead ends more than twenty feet long that branch off of the exit route.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31040, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31045
Minimize danger to employees while they are using emergency exit routes.

You must:
• Maintain each exit route to minimize danger to employees during an emergency.
• Keep each exit route free of explosive or highly flammable furnishings and decorations.
• Not require employees to travel toward areas where high hazard materials are stored, unless the route is protected by partitions or physical barriers. High hazard materials are materials that:
– Burn quickly
– Emit poisonous fumes when burned
– Are explosive
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31045, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31050
Mark exits adequately.

You must:
• Mark each exit with a clearly visible, distinctive sign reading "exit."
• Make sure the letters in the word "EXIT" are at least six inches high and 3/4 inch wide.
• Mark any doorway or passage that might be mistaken for an exit with "not an exit" or with an indication of its actual use.
• Make sure exit signs are a distinctive color.
• Make sure signs are posted and arranged along exit routes to adequately show how to get to the nearest exit and clearly indicate the direction of travel.
• Not obstruct or conceal exit signs in any way.
• Keep exit doors free of signs or decorations that obscure their visibility.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-31050, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31050, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31053
Provide adequate lighting for exit routes and signs.

You must:
• Illuminate each exit route adequately and reliably.
• Have at least five foot-candles illumination from a reliable light source.
• Make sure any exit signs illuminated by artificial lights and made of translucent material (other than internally illuminated types)
– Have screens, discs or lens of at least twenty-five square inches in size; and
– Show red or other designated color on the approach side of the exit.
• Make sure brightly lit signs, displays, or objects in or near the line of vision do not distract attention from the exit sign.
• Make sure exit signs that are self-lighting have a minimum luminance surface value of .06 footlamberts.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31053, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31055
Maintain the fire retardant properties of paints or other coatings.

You must:
• Maintain any paints or other coatings with fire retardant properties so they retain their fire retardant properties.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31055, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31060
Maintain emergency safeguards.

You must:
• Maintain each safeguard in proper working order to protect employees during an emergency. Emergency safeguards include items such as:
– Sprinkler systems.
– Alarm systems.
– Fire doors.
– Exit lighting.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31060, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31065
Maintain exit routes during construction and repair.

You must:
• Have enough exit routes that comply with these rules before letting your employees occupy a workplace under new construction.
• Make sure that employees do not occupy an existing workplace unless:
– All exits and existing fire protection are maintained; or
– Alternate fire protection is provided that ensures an equivalent level of safety.
• Make sure that flammable or explosive materials used during construction or repair do not expose employees to additional hazards or prevent emergency escape.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31065, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31067
Provide doors in freezer or refrigerated rooms that open from the inside.

You must:
• Make sure that walk-in refrigerators or freezer rooms have doors with opening devices allowing them to be opened from the inside even when they are locked from the outside.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31067, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31070
Install and maintain an appropriate employee alarm system.

Exemptions:
• If you have ten or fewer employees in a particular workplace, you can use direct voice communication to sound the alarm, if all employees can hear it. For this kind of workplace, you do not need a back-up system.
 
• In workplaces where employees would not otherwise be able to recognize audible or visible alarms, you can use tactile devices to alert them.
You must:
• Make sure that a working employee alarm system with a distinctive signal to warn employees of fire or other emergencies is installed and maintained.
Exemption:
You do not need an alarm system if employees can promptly see or smell a fire or other hazard in time to provide adequate warning to other employees.
• Make sure that the following systems meet the requirements of this rule, if you use them as your employee alarm system:
– Supervisory alarms
– Discharge alarms
– Detection systems required on fixed extinguishing systems
– Detection systems required on fire suppression systems
• Make sure that your employee alarm systems are:
– Providing enough warning to allow employees to safely escape from the workplace, the immediate work area, or both.
– Noticeable above surrounding noise or light levels by all employees in the affected portions of the workplace.
– Distinctive and recognizable as a signal, to evacuate the work area.
– Restored to working order as soon as possible, after each test or alarm.
– Supervised, if installed after July 1, 1982, and if it has that capacity.
– Able to alert assigned personnel whenever a malfunction exists in the system.
– Adequately warning employees of emergencies.
– Serviced, maintained, and tested by a person trained in the alarm system's design and functions to keep the system operating reliably and safely.
– In working order, except when undergoing repairs or maintenance.
– Warning employees of fire or other emergencies with a distinctive signal, if they are not able to see or smell a fire or other hazard.
– Manual actuation devices that, if provided, are unobstructed, easy to find, and readily accessible.
– Using alarm devices, components, combinations of devices, or systems with approved construction and installation. This applies to steam whistles, air horns, strobe lights, or similar lighting devices, as well as tactile devices.
– Supplied with spare alarm devices available to restore the system promptly if a component breaks, is worn, or destroyed.
– Kept in full operating condition by maintaining and replacing power supplies as often as necessary.
– Supplied with a back-up means of alarm, such as employee runners or telephones, when regular systems are out of service.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-18-056, § 296-800-31070, filed 9/2/08, effective 11/2/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31070, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31075
Establish procedures for sounding emergency alarms.

You must:
• Explain to each employee how to sound the alert for emergencies. Methods of reporting emergencies can include:
– Manual pull box alarms.
– Public address systems.
– Radio.
– Telephones.
• Post emergency numbers near telephones, employee notice boards, or other conspicuous locations, if you use telephones to report emergencies.
• Require that all emergency messages have priority over all nonemergency messages if the communication system also serves as an employee alarm system.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31075, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-31080
Test the employee alarm system.

You must:
• Test the reliability and adequacy of your employee alarm system every two months.
– Use a different activation device in each test of a multiactuation device system, so the entire alarm system gets tested.
• Make sure that supervised (monitored) employee alarm systems are tested at least once a year for reliability and adequacy.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-31080, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-320
Summary.

Your responsibility:
To report and conduct an investigation of certain types of accidents.
You must:
Report the death, or probable death, of any employee, or the in-patient hospitalization of any employee within 8 hours
Make sure that any equipment involved in an accident is not moved.
Assign people to assist the department of labor and industries
Conduct a preliminary investigation for all serious injuries
Document the investigation findings
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 09-01-158, § 296-800-320, filed 12/23/08, effective 3/1/09; WSR 08-05-012, § 296-800-320, filed 2/8/08, effective 4/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-320, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-320, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-32005
Report the death, probable death of any employee, or the in-patient hospitalization of any employee within 8 hours.

(1) You must report to us within eight hours of an incident that:
• Causes a fatal or possibly fatal injury
• Causes injury requiring in-patient hospitalization of any employee
EXCEPTION:
If any employer does not learn of a reportable incident at the time it occurs and the incident would otherwise be reportable under this subsection, the employer shall make a report within eight hours of the time the incident is reported to any agent or employee of the employer.
(2) Your report must include:
• Establishment name
• Location of the incident
• Time of the incident
• Number of fatalities, hospitalized employees, or pesticide exposures
• Contact person
• Phone number
• Brief description of the incident
(3) Fatalities or hospitalizations that occur within thirty days of an incident must also be reported.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 10-11-105, § 296-800-32005, filed 5/18/10, effective 7/1/10. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-05-012, § 296-800-32005, filed 2/8/08, effective 4/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-32005, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-32005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-32010
Make sure that any equipment involved in an accident is not moved.

You must:
• Not move equipment involved in a work or work related accident or incident if any of the following results:
– A death
– A probable death
– An employee's hospitalization
• Not move the equipment until a representative of the department of labor and industries investigates the incident and releases the equipment unless:
– Moving the equipment is necessary to:
♦ Remove any victims
♦ Prevent further incidents and injuries
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-05-012, § 296-800-32010, filed 2/8/08, effective 4/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-32010, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-32015
Assign people to assist the department of labor and industries.

You must:
• Assign witnesses and other employees to assist department of labor and industries personnel who arrive at the scene to investigate the incident involving:
– A death
– Probable death
– An employee's hospitalization
Include:
– The immediate supervisor
– Employees who were witnesses to the incident
– Other employees the investigator feels are necessary to complete the investigation.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 08-05-012, § 296-800-32015, filed 2/8/08, effective 4/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-32015, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-32020
Conduct a preliminary investigation for all serious injuries.

You must:
• Make sure your preliminary investigation is conducted to evaluate the facts relating to the cause of the incident by the following people:
– A person designated by the employer
– The immediate supervisor of the injured employee
– Witnesses
– An employee representative, such as a shop steward or other person chosen by the employees to represent them
– Any other person who has the experience and skills.
• If the employee representative is the business agent of the employee bargaining unit and is unavailable to participate without delaying the investigation group, you may proceed, by using one of the following:
– The shop steward
– An employee representative member of your safety committee
– A person selected by all employees to represent them
Note:
A preliminary investigation includes noting information such as the following:
 
– Where did the accident or incident occur?
 
– What time did it occur?
 
– What people were present?
 
– What was the employee doing at the time of the accident or incident?
 
– What happened during the accident or incident?
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-32020, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-32025
Document the preliminary investigation findings.

You must:
• Document the preliminary investigation findings for use at any formal investigation.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-32025, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-32025, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-330
Releasing accident investigation reports.

The department must:
• Keep accident investigations and related reports confidential.
• Not freely release results of accident investigations and related reports that are confidential.
• Make available accident investigation reports, without the need of a court order, only to the following:
– Injured workers, their legal representatives, or their labor organization representatives.
– The legal representative or labor organization representative of a deceased worker.
– The employer of any injured or deceased worker.
– Any other employer or person whose actions or business operations are the subject of the report or investigation.
– Any attorney representing a party in any pending legal action in which an investigative report constitutes material and relevant evidence.
– Employees of governmental agencies in the performance of their official duties.
– Any beneficiary of a deceased worker actually receiving benefits under the terms of Title 51 RCW, the Industrial Insurance Act.
Note:
The records officer may provide accident investigation reports to the closest surviving member of the deceased worker's immediate family.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-330, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-340
Protecting the identity of the source of confidential information.

The department must:
• Not reveal the source of information when a promise has been made to keep the identity of the source confidential.
• Not disclose information that would reveal the source's identity, whenever a department file contains an investigative report or information from a source under a promise of confidentiality.
– The contents of an investigative report may be withheld only to the extent necessary to conceal the identity of the source.
– When information is withheld, the records officer must give a general characterization of the information withheld, but must not reveal the identity of the information's source.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-340, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-360
Rule.

Your responsibility: To use the safety and health standards from national organizations and federal agencies, when directed to by WISHA rules.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-360, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-36005
Comply with standards national organizations or of federal agencies when referenced in WISHA rules.

You must:
• Use the following to be in compliance with WISHA rules:
– The edition of the standard specified in the WISHA rule or
– Any edition published after the edition specified in the WISHA rule.
Note:
The specific standards referenced in the WISHA rules are available:
• For review at your local department of labor and industries office.
• See http://www.wa.gov/lni/pa/direct.htm
• Through the local library system
• Through the issuing organization.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-36005, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]



296-800-370
Definitions.

Abatement action plans
Refers to your written plans for correcting a WISHA violation.
Abatement date
The date on the citation when you must comply with specific safety and health standards listed on the citation and notice of assessment or the corrective notice of redetermination.
Acceptable
As used in Electrical, WAC 296-800-280 means an installation or equipment is acceptable to the director of labor and industries, and approved:
• If it is accepted, or certified, or listed, or labeled, or otherwise determined to be safe by a nationally recognized testing laboratory; or
• With respect to an installation or equipment of a kind which no nationally recognized testing laboratory accepts, certifies, lists, labels, or determines to be safe, if it is inspected or tested by another federal agency, or by a state, municipal, or other local authority responsible for enforcing occupational safety provisions of the National Electrical Code, and found in compliance with the provisions of the National Electrical Code as applied in this section;
OR
• With respect to custom-made equipment or related installations which are designed, fabricated for, and intended for use by a particular customer, if it is determined to be safe for its intended use by its manufacturer on the basis of test data which the employer keeps and makes available for inspection to the director and his/her authorized representatives. Refer to federal regulation 29 C.F.R. 1910.7 for definition of nationally recognized testing laboratory.
Accepted
As used in Electrical, WAC 296-800-280 means an installation is accepted if it has been inspected and found by a nationally recognized testing laboratory to conform to specified plans or to procedures of applicable codes.
Access
As used in safety data sheets (SDSs) as exposure records, WAC 296-901-14014 means the right and opportunity to examine and copy exposure records.
Affected employees
As used in WISHA appeals, penalties and other procedural rules, WAC 296-800-350 means employees exposed to hazards identified as violations in a citation.
Analysis using exposure or medical records
• An analysis using exposure records or medical records can be any collection of data or a statistical study. It can be based on either:
– Partial or complete information from individual employee exposure or medical records or
– Information collected from health insurance claim records
• The analysis is not final until it has been:
– Reported to the employer or
– Completed by the person responsible for the analysis
ANSI
This is an acronym for the American National Standards Institute.
Approved means:
• Approved by the director of the department of labor and industries or their authorized representative, or by an organization that is specifically named in a rule, such as Underwriters' Laboratories (UL), Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA), or the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
• As used in Electrical, WAC 296-800-280 means acceptable to the authority enforcing this section. The authority enforcing this section is the director of labor and industries. The definition of acceptable indicates what is acceptable to the director and therefore approved.
Assistant director
The assistant director for the WISHA services division at the department of labor and industries or his/her designated representative.
ASTM
This is an acronym for American Society for Testing and Materials.
Attachment plug or plug
As used in the basic electrical rules, WAC 296-800-280 means the attachment at the end of a flexible cord or cable that is part of a piece of electrical equipment. When it is inserted into an outlet or receptacle, it connects the conductors supplying electrical power from the outlet to the flexible cable.
Bare conductor
A conductor that does not have any covering or insulation.
Bathroom
A room maintained within or on the premises of any place of employment, containing toilets that flush for use by employees.
Biological agents
Organisms or their by-products.
Board
As used in WISHA appeals, penalties and other procedural rules, WAC 296-800-350 means the board of industrial insurance appeals.
Ceiling
An exposure limit that must not be exceeded during any part of the employee's workday. The ceiling must be determined over the shortest time period feasible and should not exceed fifteen minutes.
Certification
As used in WISHA appeals, penalties and other procedural rules, WAC 296-800-350 means refers to an employer's written statement describing when and how a citation violation was corrected.
C.F.R.
This is an acronym for Code of Federal Regulations.
Chemical
Any element, chemical compound, or mixture of elements and/or compounds.
Chemical agents (airborne or contact)
A chemical agent is any of the following:
• Airborne chemical agent which is any of the following:
– Dust - Solid particles suspended in air, that are created by actions such as:
• Handling.
• Drilling.
• Crushing.
• Grinding.
• Rapid impact.
• Detonation.
• Decrepitation of organic or inorganic materials such as rock, ore, metal, coal, wood, and grain.
– Fume - Solid particles suspended in air, that are created by condensation from the gaseous state.
– Gas - A normally formless fluid, such as air, which can be changed to the liquid or solid state by the effect of increased pressure or decreased temperature or both.
– Mist - Liquid droplets suspended in air. Mist is created by:
• Condensation from the gaseous to the liquid state;
OR
• Converting a liquid into a dispersed state with actions such as splashing, foaming, spraying or atomizing.
– Vapor - The gaseous form of a substance that is normally in the solid or liquid state.
• Contact chemical agent which is any of the following:
– Corrosive - A substance that, upon contact, causes destruction of living tissue by chemical action, including acids with a pH of 2.5 or below or caustics with a pH of 11.0 or above.
– Irritant - A substance that will induce a local inflammatory reaction upon immediate, prolonged, or repeated contact with normal living tissue.
– Toxicant - A substance that has the inherent capacity to produce personal injury or illness to individuals by absorption through any body surface.
Chemical manufacturer
An employer with a workplace where one or more chemicals are produced for use or distribution.
Chemical name
The scientific designation of a chemical in accordance with one of the following:
• The nomenclature system developed by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC)
• The Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) rules of nomenclature
• A name which will clearly identify the chemical for the purpose of conducting a hazard evaluation.
Circuit breaker
• Is a device used to manually open or close a circuit. This device will also open the circuit automatically and without damage to the breaker when a predetermined overcurrent is applied. (600 volts nominal or less)
• Is a switching device capable of making, carrying, and breaking currents under normal circuit conditions, and also making, carrying for a specified time, and breaking currents under specified abnormal circuit conditions, such as those of short circuit. (Over 600 volts nominal)
Citation
Refers to the citation and notice issued to an employer for any violation of WISHA safety and health rules. A citation and notice may be referred to as a citation and notice of assessment but is more commonly referred to as a citation.
Commercial account
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means an arrangement in which a retail distributor sells hazardous chemical(s) to an employer, generally in large quantities over time, and/or at costs that are below the regular retail price.
Common name
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means any designation or identification such as:
• Code name
• Code number
• Trade name
• Brand name
• Generic name used to identify a chemical other than by its chemical name.
Compressed gas
A gas or mixture of gases that, when in a container, has an absolute pressure exceeding:
• 40 psi at 70°F (21.1°C)
OR
• 104 psi at 130°F (54.4°C) regardless of the pressure at 70°F (21.1°C)
Compressed gas can also mean a liquid with a vapor pressure that exceeds 40 psi at 100°F (37.8°C)
Conductor
A wire that transfers electric power.
Container
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means any container, except for pipes or piping systems, that contains a hazardous chemical. It can be any of the following:
• Bag
• Barrel
• Bottle
• Box
• Can
• Cylinder
• Drum
• Reaction vessel
• Storage tank
Correction date
The date by which a violation must be corrected. Final orders or extensions that give additional time to make corrections establish correction dates. A correction date established by an order of the board of industrial insurance appeals remains in effect during any court appeal unless the court suspends the date.
Corrective notice
Refers to a notice changing a citation and is issued by the department after a citation has been appealed.
Corrosive
A substance that, upon contact, causes destruction of living tissue by chemical action, including acids with a pH of 2.5 or below or caustics with a pH of 11.0 or above.
Covered conductor
A conductor that is covered by something else besides electrical insulation.
Damp location
As used in basic electrical rules, WAC 296-800-280 means partially protected areas that are exposed to moderate moisture. Outdoor examples include roofed open porches and marquees. Interior examples include basements and barns.
Department
Those portions of the department of labor and industries responsible for enforcing the Washington Industrial Safety Act (WISHA).
Designated representative
• Any individual or organization to which an employee gives written authorization.
• A recognized or certified collective bargaining agent without regard to written authorization.
• The legal representative of a deceased or legally incapacitated employee.
Director
The director means the director of the department of labor and industries or their designee.
Distributor
A business, other than a chemical manufacturer or importer, that supplies hazardous chemicals to other distributors or to employers.
Documentation
As used in WISHA appeals, penalties and other procedural rules, WAC 296-800-350 means material that you submit to prove that a correction is completed. Documentation includes, but is not limited to, photographs, receipts for materials and/or labor.
Dry location
As used in basic electrical rules, WAC 296-800-280 means areas not normally subjected to damp or wet conditions. Dry locations may become temporarily damp or wet, such as when constructing a building.
Dust
Solid particles suspended in air that are created by actions such as:
• Handling.
• Drilling.
• Crushing.
• Grinding.
• Rapid impact.
• Detonation.
• Decrepitation of organic or inorganic materials such as rock, ore, metal, coal, wood, and grain.
Emergency washing facilities
Emergency washing facilities are emergency showers, eyewashes, eye/face washes, hand-held drench hoses, or other similar units.
Electrical outlets
Places on an electric circuit where power is supplied to equipment through receptacles, sockets, and outlets for attachment plugs.
Employee
Based on chapter 49.17 RCW, the term employee and other terms of like meaning, unless the context of the provision containing such term indicates otherwise, means an employee of an employer who is employed in the business of his or her employer whether by way of manual labor or otherwise and every person in this state who is engaged in the employment of or who is working under an independent contract the essence of which is personal labor for an employer under this standard whether by way of manual labor or otherwise.
Employee exposure record
As used in safety data sheets (SDSs) as exposure records, WAC 296-901-14014 means a record containing any of the following kinds of information:
• Environmental (workplace) monitoring or measuring of a toxic substance or harmful physical agent, including personal, area, grab, wipe, or other form of sampling, as well as related collection and analytical methodologies, calculations, and other background data relevant to interpretation of the results obtained;
• Biological monitoring results which directly assess the absorption of a toxic substance or harmful physical agent by body systems (e.g., the level of a chemical in the blood, urine, breath, hair, fingernails, etc.) but not including results which assess the biological effect of a substance or agent or which assess an employee's use of alcohol or drugs;
• Safety data sheets indicating that the material may pose a hazard to human health;
OR
• In the absence of the above, a chemical inventory or any other record which reveals where and when used and the identity (e.g., chemical, common or trade name) of a toxic substance or harmful physical agent.
Employer
Based on chapter 49.17 RCW, an employer is any person, firm, corporation, partnership, business trust, legal representative, or other business entity which engages in any business, industry, profession, or activity in this state and employs one or more employees or who contracts with one or more persons, the essence of which is the personal labor of such person or persons and includes the state, counties, cities, and all municipal corporations, public corporations, political subdivisions of the state, and charitable organizations: Provided, That any persons, partnership, or business entity not having employees, and who is covered by the Industrial Insurance Act must be considered both an employer and an employee.
Exit
Provides a way of travel out of the workplace.
Exit route
A continuous and unobstructed path of exit travel from any point within a workplace to safety outside.
Explosive
A chemical that causes a sudden, almost instant release of pressure, gas, and heat when exposed to a sudden shock, pressure, or high temperature.
Exposed live parts
Electrical parts that are:
• Not suitably guarded, isolated, or insulated
AND
• Capable of being accidentally touched or approached closer than a safe distance.
Exposed wiring methods
Involve working with electrical wires that are attached to surfaces or behind panels designed to allow access to the wires.
Exposure or exposed
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 and safety data sheets (SDSs) as exposure records, WAC 296-901-14014. An employee has been, or may have possibly been, subjected to a hazardous chemical, toxic substance or harmful physical agent while working. An employee could have been exposed to hazardous chemicals, toxic substances, or harmful physical agents in any of the following ways:
• Inhalation
• Ingestion
• Skin contact
• Absorption
• Related means.
The terms exposure and exposed only cover workplace exposure involving a toxic substance or harmful physical agent in the workplace different from typical nonoccupational situations in the way it is:
• Used
• Handled
• Stored
• Generated
• Present
Exposure record
See definition for employee exposure record.
Extension ladder
A portable ladder with 2 or more sections and is not self-supporting. The 2 or more sections travel in guides or brackets that let you change the length. The size of a portable ladder is determined by adding together the length of each section.
Failure-to-abate
Any violation(s) resulting from not complying with an abatement date.
Final order
Any of the following (unless an employer or other party files a timely appeal):
• Citation and notice;
• Corrective notice;
• Decision and order from the board of industrial insurance appeals;
• Denial of petition for review from the board of industrial insurance appeals; or
• Decision from a Washington State superior court, court of appeals, or the state supreme court.
Final order date
The date a final order is issued.
First aid
The extent of treatment you would expect from a person trained in basic first aid, using supplies from a first-aid kit.
Tests, such as X rays, must not be confused with treatment.
Flammable
A chemical covered by one of the following categories:
• Aerosol flammable means a flammable aerosol as defined by WAC 296-901-14024, Appendix BPhysical hazard criteria;
• Gas, flammable means:
– A gas that, at temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, forms a flammable mixture with air at a concentration of 13% by volume or less or
– A gas that, at temperature and pressure of the surrounding area, forms a range of flammable mixtures with air wider than 12% by volume, regardless of the lower limit.
• Liquid, flammable means any liquid having a flashpoint at or below 199.4°F (93°C). Flammable liquids are divided into four categories as follows:
(a) Category 1 shall include liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point at or below 95°F (35°C).
(b) Category 2 shall include liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point above 95°F (35°C).
(c) Category 3 shall include liquids having flashpoints at or above 73.4°F (23°C) and at or below 140°F (60°C). When a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it shall be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C).
(d) Category 4 shall include liquids having flashpoints above 140°F (60°C) and at or below 199.4°F (93°C). When a Category 4 flammable liquid is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it shall be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C).
(e) When liquid with a flashpoint greater than 199.4°F (93°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it shall be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 4 flammable liquid.
• Solid, flammable means a solid, other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in 29 C.F.R. 1910.109(a), that is likely to cause fire through friction, moisture absorption, spontaneous chemical change, or retained heat from manufacturing or processing, or which can be ignited readily. Solid, inflammable also means that when the substance is ignited, it burns so powerfully and persistently that it creates a serious hazard. A chemical must be considered to be a flammable solid if, when tested by the method described in 16 C.F.R. 1500.44, it ignites and burns with a self-sustained flame at a rate greater than one-tenth of an inch per second along its major axis.
Flashpoint
• The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off a vapor within a test vessel in sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture with air near the surface of the liquid and shall be determined as follows:
– The flashpoint of liquids having a viscosity less than 45 Saybolt Universal Second(s) at 100°F (37.8°C) and a flashpoint below 175°F (79.4°C) shall be determined in accordance with the Standard Method of Test for Flash Point by the Tag Closed Tester, ASTM D-56-69, or an equivalent method as defined by WAC 296-901-14024, Appendix BPhysical hazard criteria.
Flexible cords and cables
Typically used to connect electrical equipment to an outlet or receptacle. These cords can have an attachment plug to connect to a power source or can be permanently wired into the power source. Flexible cords, extension cords, cables and electrical cords are all examples of flexible cord.
Floor hole
An opening in any floor, platform, pavement, or yard that measures at least one inch but less than 12 inches at its smallest dimension and through which materials and tools (but not people) can fall.
Examples of floor holes are:
• Belt holes
• Pipe openings
• Slot openings
Floor opening
An opening in any floor, platform, pavement, or yard that measures at least 12 inches in its smallest dimension and through which a person can fall.
Examples of floor openings are:
• Hatchways
• Stair or ladder openings
• Pits
• Large manholes
The following are NOT considered floor openings:
• Openings occupied by elevators
• Dumbwaiters
• Conveyors
• Machinery
• Containers
Foreseeable emergency
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means any potential event that could result in an uncontrolled release of a hazardous chemical into the workplace. Examples of foreseeable emergencies include equipment failure, rupture of containers, or failure of control equipment.
Fume
Solid particles suspended in air that are created by condensation from the gaseous state.
Gas
A normally formless fluid, such as air, which can be changed to the liquid or solid state by the effect of increased pressure or decreased temperature or both.
Ground
As used in Electrical, WAC 296-800-280, a connection between an electrical circuit or equipment and the earth or other conducting body besides the earth. This connection can be intentional or accidental.
Grounded
A connection has been made between an electrical circuit or equipment and the earth or another conducting body besides the earth.
Grounded conductor
A system or circuit conductor that is intentionally grounded.
Ground-fault circuit-interrupter
A device whose function is to interrupt the electric circuit to the load when a fault current to ground exceeds some predetermined value that is less than that required to operate the overcurrent protective device of the supply circuit.
Grounding conductor
Is used to connect equipment or the grounded circuit of a wiring system to a grounding electrode or electrodes.
Grounding conductor, equipment
A conductor used to connect noncurrent-carrying metal parts of equipment, raceways, and other enclosures to the system grounded conductor and/or the grounding electrode conductor at the service equipment or at the source of a separately derived system.
Guarded
Covered, shielded, fenced, enclosed, or otherwise protected by means of suitable covers, casings, barriers, rails, screens, mats, or platforms to remove the likelihood of being accidentally touched or approached closer than a safe distance.
Hand-held drench hoses
Hand-held drench hoses are single-headed emergency washing devices connected to a flexible hose that can be used to irrigate and flush the face or other body parts.
Handrail
A single bar or pipe supported on brackets from a wall or partition to provide a continuous handhold for persons using a stair.
Harmful physical agent
Any physical stress such as noise, vibration, repetitive motion, heat, cold, ionizing and nonionizing radiation, and hypo- or hyperbaric pressure which:
• Is listed in the latest edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS); or
• Has shown positive evidence of an acute or chronic health hazard in testing conducted by, or known to, the employer;
OR
• Is the subject of a safety data sheet kept by or known to the employer showing that the material may pose a hazard to human health.
Hazard
Any condition, potential or inherent, which can cause injury, death, or occupational disease.
Hazard warning
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 can be a combination of words, pictures, symbols, or combination appearing on a label or other appropriate form of warning which shows the specific physical and health hazard(s), including target organ effects, of the chemical(s) in the container(s).
Note:
See definition for physical hazard and health hazard to determine which hazards must be covered.
Hazardous chemical
Any chemical that is a physical or health hazard.
Health hazard
A chemical, mixture, biological agent, or physical agent that may cause health effects in short- or long-term exposed employees. Based on statistically significant evidence from at least one study conducted using established scientific principles. Health hazards include:
• Carcinogens
• Toxic or highly toxic agents
• Reproductive toxins
• Irritants
• Corrosives
• Sensitizers
• Hepatotoxins (liver toxins)
• Nephrotoxins (kidney toxins)
• Neurotoxins (nervous system toxins)
• Substances that act on the hematopoietic system (blood or blood-forming system)
• Substances that can damage the lungs, skin, eyes, or mucous membranes
• Hot or cold conditions.
Hospitalization
To be admitted to a hospital or an equivalent medical facility on an emergent in-patient basis requiring an overnight stay.
Identity
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means any chemical or common name listed on the safety data sheet (SDS) for the specific chemical. Each identity used must allow cross-references among the:
• Required list of hazardous chemicals
• Chemical label
• MSDSs
Imminent danger violation
Any violation(s) resulting from conditions or practices in any place of employment, which are such that a danger exists which could reasonably be expected to cause death or serious physical harm, immediately or before such danger can be eliminated through the enforcement procedures otherwise provided by the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act.
Importer
The first business within the Customs Territory of the USA that:
• Receives hazardous chemicals produced in other countries
AND
• Supplies them to distributors or employers within the USA
Insulated
A conductor has been completely covered by a material that is recognized as electrical insulation and is thick enough based on:
• The amount of voltage involved
AND
• The type of covering material
Interim waiver
An order granted by the department allowing an employer to vary from WISHA requirements until the department decides to grant a permanent or temporary waiver.
Irritant
A substance that will induce a local inflammatory reaction upon immediate, prolonged, or repeated contact with normal living tissue.
Ladder
Consists of 2 side rails joined at regular intervals by crosspieces called steps, rungs, or cleats. These steps are used to climb up or down.
Listed
Equipment is listed if it:
• Is listed in a publication by a nationally recognized laboratory (such as UL, underwriters laboratory) that inspects the production of that type of equipment,
AND
• States the equipment meets nationally recognized standards or has been tested and found safe to use in a specific manner.
Medical treatment
Treatment provided by a physician or by registered professional personnel under the standing orders of a physician. Medical treatment does not include first-aid treatment even if provided by a physician or registered professional personnel.
Mist
Liquid droplets suspended in air. Mist is created by:
• Condensation from the gaseous to the liquid state;
OR
• Converting a liquid into a dispersed state with actions such as splashing, foaming, spraying or atomizing.
Mixture
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, any combination of 2 or more chemicals (if that combination did not result from a chemical reaction).
Movable equipment
As used in WAC 296-800-35052, a hand-held or nonhand-held machine or device;
• That is powered or nonpowered;
AND
• Can be moved within or between worksites
Must
Must means mandatory.
NEMA
These initials stand for National Electrical Manufacturing Association.
NFPA
This is an acronym for National Fire Protection Association.
Nose
The portion of the stair tread that projects over the face of the riser below it.
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
Created in 1970 when the U.S. Congress passed the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provides safety on the job for workers. OSHA oversees state plans (such as WISHA in Washington) that have elected to administer the safety and health program for their state. OSHA requires WISHA rules to be at least as effective as OSHA rules.
Office work environment
An indoor or enclosed occupied space where clerical work, administration, or business is carried out.
In addition, it includes:
• Other workplace spaces controlled by the employer and used by office workers, such as cafeterias, meeting rooms, and washrooms.
• Office areas of manufacturing and production facilities, not including process areas.
• Office areas of businesses such as food and beverage establishments, agricultural operations, construction, commercial trade, services, etc.
Open riser
A stair step with an air space between treads has an open riser.
Organic peroxide
This is an organic compound containing the bivalent-0-0-structure. It may be considered a structural derivative of hydrogen peroxide if one or both of the hydrogen atoms has been replaced by an organic radical.
Outlet
See definition for electrical outlets.
Oxidizer
A chemical other than a blasting agent or explosive as defined in WAC 296-52-60130 or C.F.R. 1910.109(a), that starts or promotes combustion in other materials, causing fire either of itself or through the release of oxygen or other gases.
Permissible exposure limits (PELs)
Permissible exposure limits (PELs) are employee exposures to toxic substances or harmful physical agents that must not be exceeded. PELs are specified in applicable WISHA rules.
Person
Based on chapter 49.17 RCW, one or more individuals, partnerships, associations, corporations, business trusts, legal representatives, or any organized group of persons.
Personal eyewash units
Personal eyewash units are portable, supplementary units that support plumbed units or self-contained units, or both, by delivering immediate flushing for less than fifteen minutes.
Personal service room
Used for activities not directly connected with a business' production or service function such as:
• First aid
• Medical services
• Dressing
• Showering
• Bathrooms
• Washing
• Eating
Personnel
See the definition for employees.
Physical hazard
Means a chemical that is classified as posing one of the following hazardous effects: Explosive; flammable (gases, aerosols, liquids, or solids); oxidizer (liquid, solid or gas); self-reactive; pyrophoric (liquid or solid); self-heating; organic peroxide; corrosive to metal; gas under pressure; or in contact with water emits flammable gas. WAC 296-901-14024, Appendix BPhysical hazard criteria.
Platform
Platform means an extended step or landing that breaks a continuous run of stairs.
Plug
See definition for attachment plug.
Potable water
Water that is suitable for drinking by the public and meets the requirements of chapter 246-290 or 246-291 WAC.
Predictable and regular basis
Employee functions such as, but not limited to, inspection, service, repair and maintenance which are performed
• At least once every 2 weeks
OR
• 4 man-hours or more during any sequential 4-week period (to calculate man-hours multiply the number of employees by the number of hours during a 4-week period).
Produce
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, any one of the following:
• Manufacture
• Process
• Formulate
• Blend
• Extract
• Generate
• Emit
• Repackage
Purchaser
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, an employer who buys one or more hazardous chemicals to use in their workplace.
Pyrophoric
A chemical is pyrophoric if it will ignite spontaneously in the air when the temperature is 130°F (54.4°C) or below.
Qualified person
A person who has successfully demonstrated the ability to solve problems relating to the subject matter, work, or project, either by:
• Possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing;
OR
• Extensive knowledge, training and experience.
Railing or standard railing
A vertical barrier erected along exposed edges of a floor opening, wall opening, ramp, platform, or runway to prevent falls of persons.
Reassume jurisdiction
The department has decided to take back its control over a citation and notice being appealed.
Receptacle or receptacle outlet
As used in basic electrical rules, WAC 296-800-280 means outlets that accept a plug to supply electric power to equipment through a cord or cable.
Record
A record is any item, collection, or grouping of information. Examples include:
• Paper document
• Microfiche
• Microfilm
• X-ray film
• Computer record
Repeat violation
A violation is a repeat violation if the employer has been cited one or more times previously for a substantially similar hazard.
Refuge area
• A protected space along an exit route that is separated from other spaces inside the building by a barrier with at least a one-hour fire resistance rating;
OR
• A floor in a building with an automatic sprinkler system that has at least two spaces that are separated by smoke-resistant partitions. See WAC 296-24-607 for requirements for automatic sprinkler systems.
Responsible party
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140. Someone who can provide appropriate information about the hazardous chemical and emergency procedures.
Rise
The vertical distance from the top of a tread to the top of the next higher tread.
Riser
The vertical part of the step at the back of a tread that rises to the front of the tread above.
Rungs
Rungs are the cross pieces on ladders that are used to climb up and down the ladder.
Runway
An elevated walkway above the surrounding floor or ground level. Examples of runways are footwalks along shafting or walkways between buildings.
Safety data sheet (SDS)
Written, printed, or electronic information (on paper, microfiche, or on-screen) that informs manufacturers, distributors, employers or employees about a hazardous chemical, its hazards, and protective measures as required by safety data sheet and label preparation, WAC 296-901-140.
Safety factor
The term safety factor means the ratio of when something will break versus the actual working stress or safe load when it is used.
Self-lighting or self-luminous
A light source that:
• Is illuminated by a self-contained power source other than batteries;
AND
• Operates independently from external power sources.
Serious violation
Serious violation must be deemed to exist in a workplace if there is a substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a condition which exists, or from one or more practices, means, methods, operations, or processes which have been adopted or are in use in such workplace, unless the employer did not, and could not with the exercise of reasonable diligence, know of the presence of the violation.
Short-term exposure limit (STEL)
An exposure limit, averaged over a short time period (usually measured for 15 minutes) that must not be exceeded during any part of an employee's workday.
Should
Should means recommended.
Single ladder
A type of portable ladder with one section.
It is distinguished by all of the following:
• It has one section
• It cannot support itself
• Its length cannot be adjusted
Smoking
A person is smoking if they are:
• Lighting up
• Inhaling
• Exhaling
• Carrying a pipe, cigar or cigarette of any kind that is burning
Specific chemical identity
This term applies to chemical substances. It can mean the:
• Chemical name
• Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) registry number
• Any other information that reveals the precise chemical designation of the substance.
Stair railing
A vertical barrier attached to a stairway with an open side to prevent falls. The top surface of the stair railing is used as a handrail
Stairs or stairway
A series of steps and landings:
– Leading from one level or floor to another
– Leading to platforms, pits, boiler rooms, crossovers, or around machinery, tanks, and other equipment
– Used more or less continuously or routinely by employees, or only occasionally by specific individuals
– With three or more risers
Standard safeguard
Safety devices that prevent hazards by their attachment to:
• Machinery
• Appliances
• Tools
• Buildings
• Equipment
These safeguards must be constructed of:
• Metal
• Wood
• Other suitable materials
The department makes the final determination about whether a safeguard is sufficient for its use.
Step ladder
A portable ladder with:
• Flat steps
• A hinge at the top allowing the ladder to fold out and support itself
• Its length that cannot be adjusted.
Time weighted average (TWA8)
An exposure limit, averaged over 8 hours, that must not be exceeded during an employee's work shift.
Toeboard
A barrier at floor level along exposed edges of a floor opening, wall opening, platform, runway, or ramp, to prevent falls of materials.
Toxic chemical
As used in first aid, WAC 296-800-150, is a chemical that produces serious injury or illness when absorbed through any body surface.
Toxic substance
Any chemical substance or biological agent, such as bacteria, virus, and fungus, which is any of the following:
• Listed in the latest edition of the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS)
• Shows positive evidence of an acute or chronic health hazard in testing conducted by, or known to, the employer
• The subject of a safety data sheet kept by or known to the employer showing the material may pose a hazard to human health.
Toxicant
A substance that has the inherent capacity to produce personal injury or illness to individuals by absorption through any body surface.
Trade secret
Any confidential:
• Formula
• Pattern
• Process
• Device
• Information
• Collection of information
The trade secret is used in an employer's business and gives an opportunity to gain an advantage over competitors who do not know or use it.
See WAC 296-901-14018 for requirements dealing with trade secrets.
Tread
As used in stairs and stair railings, WAC 296-800-250 means the horizontal part of the stair step.
Tread run
As used in stairs and stair railings, WAC 296-800-250 means the distance from the front of one stair tread to the front of an adjacent tread.
Tread width
The distance from front to rear of the same tread including the nose, if used.
UL (Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.)
You will find these initials on electrical cords and equipment. The initials mean the cord or equipment meets the standards set by the Underwriters' Laboratories, Inc.
Unstable (reactive)
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140. An unstable or reactive chemical is one that in its pure state, or as produced or transported, will vigorously polymerize, decompose, condense, or will become self-reactive under conditions of shocks, pressure or temperature.
Use
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, means to:
• Package
• Handle
• React
• Emit
• Extract
• Generate as a by-product
• Transfer.
Vapor
The gaseous form of a substance that is normally in the solid or liquid state.
Voltage of a circuit
The greatest effective potential difference between any two conductors or between a conductor and ground.
Voltage to ground
The voltage between a conductor and the point or conductor of the grounded circuit. For undergrounded circuits, it is the greatest voltage between the conductor and any other conductor of the circuit.
Voltage, nominal
Nominal voltage is a value assigned to a circuit or system to designate its voltage class (120/240, 480Y/277, 600, etc.). The actual circuit voltage can vary from the value if it is within a range that permits the equipment to continue operating in a satisfactory manner.
WAC
This is an acronym for Washington Administrative Code, which are rules developed to address state law.
Water-reactive
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, a water-reactive chemical reacts with water to release a gas that is either flammable or presents a health hazard.
Watertight
Constructed so that moisture will not enter the enclosure or container.
Weatherproof
Constructed or protected so that exposure to the weather will not interfere with successful operation. Rainproof, raintight, or watertight equipment can fulfill the requirements for weatherproof where varying weather conditions other than wetness, such as snow, ice, dust, or temperature extremes, are not a factor.
Wet location
As used in basic electrical rules, WAC 296-800-280 means:
• Underground installations or in concrete slabs or masonry that are in direct contact with the earth
• Locations that can be saturated by water or other liquids
• Unprotected locations exposed to the weather (like vehicle washing areas)
WISHA
This is an acronym for the Washington Industrial Safety and Health Act.
Work area
As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140, a room or defined space in a workplace where hazardous chemicals are produced or used, and where employees are present.
Working days
Means a calendar day, except Saturdays, Sundays, and legal holidays. Legal holidays include:
– New Year's Day - January 1
– Martin Luther King, Jr. Day
– Presidents' Day
– Memorial Day
– Independence Day - July 4
– Labor Day
– Veterans' Day - November 11
– Thanksgiving Day
– The day after Thanksgiving Day; and
– Christmas Day - December 25
The number of working days must be calculated by not counting the first working day and counting the last working day.
Worker
See the definition for employee.
Workplace
• The term workplace means:
– Any plant, yard, premises, room, or other place where an employee or employees are employed for the performance of labor or service over which the employer has the right of access or control, and includes, but is not limited to, all workplaces covered by industrial insurance under Title 51 RCW, as now or hereafter amended.
– As used in Hazard communication, WAC 296-901-140 means an establishment, job site, or project, at one geographical location containing one or more work areas.
You
See definition of employer.
Your representative
Your representative is the person selected to act in your behalf.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and 29 C.F.R. 1910 Subpart Z. WSR 14-07-086, § 296-800-370, filed 3/18/14, effective 5/1/14. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060 and chapter 49.17 RCW. WSR 12-24-071, § 296-800-370, filed 12/4/12, effective 1/4/13. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, 49.17.060. WSR 09-01-158, § 296-800-370, filed 12/23/08, effective 3/1/09; WSR 08-18-056, § 296-800-370, filed 9/2/08, effective 11/2/08; WSR 03-18-090, § 296-800-370, filed 9/2/03, effective 11/1/03. Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, [49.17].040, and [49.17].050. WSR 02-16-047, § 296-800-370, filed 8/1/02, effective 10/1/02; WSR 01-23-060, § 296-800-370, filed 11/20/01, effective 12/1/01; WSR 01-11-038, § 296-800-370, filed 5/9/01, effective 9/1/01.]