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WAC 173-340-900

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Tables.

Table 708-1: Toxicity Equivalency Factors for Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and Chlorinated Dibenzofurans Congeners
 
CAS Number
Hazardous Substance
Toxicity Equivalency
Factor (unitless)(1)
 
 
Dioxin Congeners
 
 
 
1746-01-6
2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
1
 
 
40321-76-4
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
1
 
 
39227-28-6
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
0.1
 
 
57653-85-7
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
0.1
 
 
19408-74-3
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
0.1
 
 
35822-46-9
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
0.01
 
 
3268-87-9
1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachloro dibenzo-p-dioxin
0.0003
 
 
 
Furan Congeners
 
 
 
51207-31-9
2,3,7,8-Tetrachloro dibenzofuran
0.1
 
 
57117-41-6
1,2,3,7,8-Pentachloro dibenzofuran
0.03
 
 
57117-31-4
2,3,4,7,8-Pentachloro dibenzofuran
0.3
 
 
70648-26-9
1,2,3,4,7,8-Hexachloro dibenzofuran
0.1
 
 
57117-44-9
1,2,3,6,7,8-Hexachloro dibenzofuran
0.1
 
 
72918-21-9
1,2,3,7,8,9-Hexachloro dibenzofuran
0.1
 
 
60851-34-5
2,3,4,6,7,8-Hexachloro dibenzofuran
0.1
 
 
67562-39-4
1,2,3,4,6,7,8-Heptachloro dibenzofuran
0.01
 
 
55673-89-7
1,2,3,4,7,8,9-Heptachloro dibenzofuran
0.01
 
 
39001-02-0
1,2,3,4,6,7,8,9-Octachloro dibenzofuran
0.0003
 
(1)
Source: Van den Berg et al. 2006. The 2005 World Health Organization Re-evaluation of Human and Mammalian Toxic Equivalency Factors for Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds.
Toxicological Sciences 2006 93(2):223-241; doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfl055.
Table 708-2: Toxicity Equivalency Factors
for Minimum Required Carcinogenic
Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (cPAHs) under
CAS
Number
Hazardous Substance
TEF
(unitless)(1)
50-32-08
benzo[a]pyrene
1
 
56-55-3
benzo[a]anthracene
0.1
 
205-99-2
benzo[b]fluoranthene
0.1
 
207-08-9
benzo[k]fluoranthene
0.1
 
218-01-9
chrysene
0.01
 
53-70-3
dibenz[a, h]anthracene
0.1
 
193-39-5
indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene
0.1
 
(1)
Source: Cal-EPA, 2005. Air Toxics Hot Spots Program Risk Assessment Guidelines, Part II Technical Support Document for Describing Available Cancer Potency Factors. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency. May 2005.
Table 708-3: Toxicity Equivalency Factors for Carcinogenic Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons (cPAHs) that May be Required under WAC 173-340-708 (8)(e)(v)
CAS
Number
Hazardous Substance
TEF
(unitless)(1)
205-82-3
benzo(j)fluoranthene
0.1
 
224-42-0
dibenz[a, j]acridine
0.1
 
226-36-8
dibenz[a, h]acridine
0.1
 
194-59-2
7H-dibenzo[c, g]carbazole
1
 
192-65-4
dibenzo[a, e]pyrene
1
 
189-64-0
dibenzo[a, h]pyrene
10
 
189-55-9
dibenzo[a, i]pyrene
10
 
191-30-0
dibenzo[a, l]pyrene
10
 
3351-31-3
5-methylchrysene
1
 
5522-43-0
1-nitropyrene
0.1
 
57835-92-4
4-nitropyrene
0.1
 
42397-64-8
1,6-dinitropyrene
10
 
42397-65-9
1,8-dinitropyrene
1
 
7496-02-8
6-nitrochrysene
10
 
607-57-8
2-nitrofluorene
0.01
 
57-97-6
7,12-dimethylbenzanthracene
10
 
56-49-5
3-methylcholanthrene
1
 
602-87-9
5-nitroacenaphthene
0.01
 
(1)
Source: Cal-EPA, 2005. Air Toxics Hot Spots Program Risk Assessment Guidelines, Part II Technical Support Document for Describing Available Cancer Potency Factors. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment, California Environmental Protection Agency. May 2005.
Table 708-4: Toxicity Equivalency Factors for Dioxin-Like Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
CAS
Number
Hazardous Substance
TEF
(unitless)(1)
 
Dioxin-Like PCBs
 
 
32598-13-3
3,3',4,4'-Tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 77)
0.0001
 
70362-50-4
3,4,4',5- Tetrachlorobiphenyl (PCB 81)
0.0003
 
32598-14-4
2,3,3',4,4'-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 105)
0.00003
 
74472-37-0
2,3,4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 114)
0.00003
 
31508-00-6
2,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 118)
0.00003
 
65510-44-3
2',3,4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 123)
0.00003
 
57465-28-8
3,3',4,4',5-Pentachlorobiphenyl (PCB 126)
0.1
 
38380-08-4
2,3,3',4,4',5-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 156)
0.00003
 
69782-90-7
2,3,3',4,4',5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 157)
0.00003
 
52663-72-6
2,3',4,4',5,5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 167)
0.00003
 
32774-16-6
3,3',4,4',5,5'-Hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB 169)
0.03
 
39635-31-9
2,3,3',4,4',5,5'-Heptachlorobiphenyl (PCB 189)
0.00003
 
(1)
Source: Van den Berg et al. 2006. The 2005 World Health Organization Re-evaluation of Human and Mammalian Toxic Equivalency Factors for Dioxins and Dioxin-like Compounds. Toxicological Sciences 2006 93(2):223-241; doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfl055.
Table 720-1
Method A Cleanup Levels for Groundwater.a
Hazardous Substance
CAS
Number
Cleanup Level
Arsenic
7440-38-2
5 ug/literb
Benzene
71-43-2
5 ug/literc
Benzo(a)pyrene
50-32-8
0.1 ug/literd
Cadmium
7440-43-9
5 ug/litere
Chromium (Total)
7440-47-3
50 ug/literf
DDT
50-29-3
0.3 ug/literg
1,2 Dichloroethane (EDC)
107-06-2
5 ug/literh
Ethylbenzene
100-41-4
700 ug/literi
Ethylene dibromide (EDB)
106-93-4
0.01 ug/literj
Gross Alpha Particle Activity
 
15 pCi/literk
Gross Beta Particle Activity
 
4 mrem/yrl
Lead
7439-92-1
15 ug/literm
Lindane
58-89-9
0.2 ug/litern
Methylene chloride
75-09-2
5 ug/litero
Mercury
7439-97-6
2 ug/literp
MTBE
1634-04-4
20 ug/literq
Naphthalenes
91-20-3
160 ug/literr
PAHs (carcinogenic)
 
See
benzo(a)pyrened
PCB mixtures
 
0.1 ug/liters
Radium 226 and 228
 
5 pCi/litert
Radium 226
 
3 pCi/literu
Tetrachloroethylene
127-18-4
5 ug/literv
Toluene
108-88-3
1,000 ug/literw
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbonsx
 
 
[Note: Must also test for and meet cleanup levels for other petroleum components—see footnotes!]
   Gasoline Range Organics
 
 
Benzene present in groundwater
 
800 ug/liter
No detectable benzene in groundwater
 
1,000 ug/liter
   Diesel Range Organics
 
500 ug/liter
   Heavy Oils
 
500 ug/liter
   Mineral Oil
 
500 ug/liter
1,1,1 Trichloroethane
71-55-6
200 ug/litery
Trichloroethylene
79-01-6
5 ug/literz
Vinyl chloride
75-01-4
0.2 ug/literaa
Xylenes
1330-20-7
1,000 ug/literbb
Footnotes:
 
a
Caution on misusing this table. This table has been developed for specific purposes. It is intended to provide conservative cleanup levels for drinking water beneficial uses at sites undergoing routine cleanup actions or those sites with relatively few hazardous substances. This table may not be appropriate for defining cleanup levels at other sites. For these reasons, the values in this table should not automatically be used to define cleanup levels that must be met for financial, real estate, insurance coverage or placement, or similar transactions or purposes. Exceedances of the values in this table do not necessarily mean the groundwater must be restored to those levels at all sites. The level of restoration depends on the remedy selected under WAC 173-340-350 through 173-340-390.
b
Arsenic. Cleanup level based on background concentrations for state of Washington.
c
Benzene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
d
Benzo(a)pyrene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61), adjusted to a 1 x 10-5 risk. If other carcinogenic PAHs are suspected of being present at the site, test for them and use this value as the total concentration that all carcinogenic PAHs must meet using the toxicity equivalency methodology in WAC 173-340-708(8).
e
Cadmium. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.62).
f
Chromium (Total). Cleanup level based on concentration derived using Equation 720-1 for hexavalent chromium. This is a total value for chromium III and chromium VI. If just chromium III is present at the site, a cleanup level of 100 ug/l may be used (based on WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.62).
g
DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Cleanup levels based on concentration derived using Equation 720-2.
h
1,2 Dichloroethane (ethylene dichloride or EDC). Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
i
Ethylbenzene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
j
Ethylene dibromide (1,2 dibromoethane or EDB). Cleanup level based on concentration derived using Equation 720-2, adjusted for the practical quantitation limit.
k
Gross Alpha Particle Activity, excluding uranium. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.15).
l
Gross Beta Particle Activity, including gamma activity. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.15).
m
Lead. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (40 C.F.R. 141.80).
n
Lindane. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
o
Methylene chloride (dichloromethane). Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
p
Mercury. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.62).
q
Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Cleanup level based on federal drinking water advisory level (EPA-822-F-97-009, December 1997).
r
Naphthalenes. Cleanup level based on concentration derived using Equation 720-1. This is a total value for naphthalene, 1-methyl naphthalene and 2-methyl naphthalene.
s
PCB mixtures. Cleanup level based on concentration derived using Equation 720-2, adjusted for the practical quantitation limit. This cleanup level is a total value for all PCBs.
t
Radium 226 and 228. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.15).
u
Radium 226. Cleanup level based on applicable state law (WAC 246-290-310).
v
Tetrachloroethylene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
w
Toluene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
x
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). TPH cleanup values have been provided for the most common petroleum products encountered at contaminated sites. Where there is a mixture of products or the product composition is unknown, samples must be tested using both the NWTPH-Gx and NWTPH-Dx methods and the lowest applicable TPH cleanup level must be met.
Gasoline range organics means organic compounds measured using method NWTPH-Gx. Examples are aviation and automotive gasoline. The cleanup level is based on protection of groundwater for noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use. Two cleanup levels are provided. The higher value is based on the assumption that no benzene is present in the groundwater sample. If any detectable amount of benzene is present in the groundwater sample, then the lower TPH cleanup level must be used. No interpolation between these cleanup levels is allowed. The groundwater cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene, EDB and EDC] and any noncarcinogenic components [such as ethylbenzene, toluene, xylenes and MTBE], if present at the site, must also be met. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for gasoline releases.
Diesel range organics means organic compounds measured using NWTPH-Dx. Examples are diesel, kerosene, and #1 and #2 heating oil. The cleanup level is based on protection from noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use. The groundwater cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene and PAHs] and any noncarcinogenic components [such as ethylbenzene, toluene, xylenes and naphthalenes], if present at the site, must also be met. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for diesel releases.
Heavy oils means organic compounds measured using NWTPH-Dx. Examples are #6 fuel oil, bunker C oil, hydraulic oil and waste oil. The cleanup level is based on protection from noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use, assuming a product composition similar to diesel fuel. The groundwater cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene, PAHs and PCBs] and any noncarcinogenic components [such as ethylbenzene, toluene, xylenes and naphthalenes], if present at the site, must also be met. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for heavy oil releases.
Mineral oil means non-PCB mineral oil, typically used as an insulator and coolant in electrical devices such as transformers and capacitors measured using NWTPH-Dx. The cleanup level is based on protection from noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use. Sites using this cleanup level must analyze groundwater samples for PCBs and meet the PCB cleanup level in this table unless it can be demonstrated that: (1) The release originated from an electrical device manufactured after July 1, 1979; or (2) oil containing PCBs was never used in the equipment suspected as the source of the release; or (3) it can be documented that the oil released was recently tested and did not contain PCBs. Method B (or Method C, if applicable) must be used for releases of oils containing greater than 50 ppm PCBs. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for mineral oil releases.
y
1,1,1 Trichloroethane. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
z
Trichloroethylene. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61).
aa
Vinyl chloride. Cleanup level based on applicable state and federal law (WAC 246-290-310 and 40 C.F.R. 141.61), adjusted to a 1 x 10-5 risk.
bb
Xylenes. Cleanup level based on xylene not exceeding the maximum allowed cleanup level in this table for total petroleum hydrocarbons and on prevention of adverse aesthetic characteristics. This is a total value for all xylenes.
Table 740-1
Method A Soil Cleanup Levels for
Unrestricted Land Uses.a
Hazardous Substance
CAS
Number
Cleanup Level
Arsenic
7440-38-2
20 mg/kgb
Benzene
71-43-2
0.03 mg/kgc
Benzo(a)pyrene
50-32-8
0.1 mg/kgd
Cadmium
7440-43-9
2 mg/kge
Chromium
 
 
Chromium VI
18540-29-9
19 mg/kgf1
Chromium III
16065-83-1
2,000 mg/kgf2
DDT
50-29-3
3 mg/kgg
Ethylbenzene
100-41-4
6 mg/kgh
Ethylene dibromide (EDB)
106-93-4
0.005 mg/kgi
Lead
7439-92-1
250 mg/kgj
Lindane
58-89-9
0.01 mg/kgk
Methylene chloride
75-09-2
0.02 mg/kgl
Mercury (inorganic)
7439-97-6
2 mg/kgm
MTBE
1634-04-4
0.1 mg/kgn
Naphthalenes
91-20-3
5 mg/kgo
PAHs (carcinogenic)
 
See benzo(a)pyrened
PCB Mixtures
 
1 mg/kgp
Tetrachloroethylene
127-18-4
0.05 mg/kgq
Toluene
108-88-3
7 mg/kgr
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbonss
 
 
[Note: Must also test for and meet cleanup levels for other petroleum components—see footnotes!]
   Gasoline Range Organics
 
 
Gasoline mixtures without benzene and the total of ethylbenzene, toluene and xylene are less than 1% of the gasoline mixture
 
100 mg/kg
All other gasoline mixtures
 
30 mg/kg
   Diesel Range Organics
 
2,000 mg/kg
   Heavy Oils
 
2,000 mg/kg
   Mineral Oil
 
4,000 mg/kg
1,1,1 Trichloroethane
71-55-6
2 mg/kgt
Trichloroethylene
79-01-6
0.03 mg/kgu
Xylenes
1330-20-7
9 mg/kgv
Footnotes:
 
a
Caution on misusing this table. This table has been developed for specific purposes. It is intended to provide conservative cleanup levels for sites undergoing routine cleanup actions or for sites with relatively few hazardous substances, and the site qualifies under WAC 173-340-7491 for an exclusion from conducting a simplified or site-specific terrestrial ecological evaluation, or it can be demonstrated using a terrestrial ecological evaluation under WAC 173-340-7492 or 173-340-7493 that the values in this table are ecologically protective for the site. This table may not be appropriate for defining cleanup levels at other sites. For these reasons, the values in this table should not automatically be used to define cleanup levels that must be met for financial, real estate, insurance coverage or placement, or similar transactions or purposes. Exceedances of the values in this table do not necessarily mean the soil must be restored to these levels at a site. The level of restoration depends on the remedy selected under WAC 173-340-350 through 173-340-390.
b
Arsenic. Cleanup level based on direct contact using Equation 740-2 and protection of groundwater for drinking water use using the procedures in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for natural background for soil.
c
Benzene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures in WAC 173-340-747 (4) and (6).
d
Benzo(a)pyrene. Cleanup level based on direct contact using Equation 740-2. If other carcinogenic PAHs are suspected of being present at the site, test for them and use this value as the total concentration that all carcinogenic PAHs must meet using the toxicity equivalency methodology in WAC 173-340-708(8).
e
Cadmium. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit for soil.
f1
Chromium VI. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
f2
Chromium III. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). Chromium VI must also be tested for and the cleanup level met when present at a site.
g
DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Cleanup level based on direct contact using Equation 740-2.
h
Ethylbenzene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
i
Ethylene dibromide (1,2 dibromoethane or EDB). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit for soil.
j
Lead. Cleanup level based on preventing unacceptable blood lead levels.
k
Lindane. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit.
l
Methylene chloride (dichloromethane). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
m
Mercury. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
n
Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
o
Naphthalenes. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). This is a total value for naphthalene, 1-methyl naphthalene and 2-methyl naphthalene.
p
PCB Mixtures. Cleanup level based on applicable federal law (40 C.F.R. 761.61). This is a total value for all PCBs.
q
Tetrachloroethylene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
r
Toluene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
s
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). TPH cleanup values have been provided for the most common petroleum products encountered at contaminated sites. Where there is a mixture of products or the product composition is unknown, samples must be tested using both the NWTPH-Gx and NWTPH-Dx methods and the lowest applicable TPH cleanup level must be met.
Gasoline range organics means organic compounds measured using method NWTPH-Gx. Examples are aviation and automotive gasoline. The cleanup level is based on protection of groundwater for noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(6). Two cleanup levels are provided. The lower value of 30 mg/kg can be used at any site. When using this lower value, the soil must also be tested for and meet the benzene soil cleanup level. The higher value of 100 mg/kg can only be used if the soil is tested and found to contain no benzene and the total of ethylbenzene, toluene and xylene are less than 1% of the gasoline mixture. No interpolation between these cleanup levels is allowed. In both cases, the soil cleanup level for any other carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as EDB and EDC], if present at the site, must also be met. Also, in both cases, soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, and MTBE], also must be met if these substances are found to exceed groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for gasoline releases.
Diesel range organics means organic compounds measured using method NWTPH-Dx. Examples are diesel, kerosene, and #1 and #2 heating oil. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10). The soil cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene and PAHs], if present at the site, must also be met. Soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and naphthalenes], also must be met if these substances are found to exceed the groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for diesel releases.
Heavy oils means organic compounds measured using NWTPH-Dx. Examples are #6 fuel oil, bunker C oil, hydraulic oil and waste oil. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10) and assuming a product composition similar to diesel fuel. The soil cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene, PAHs and PCBs], if present at the site, must also be met. Soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and naphthalenes], also must be met if found to exceed the groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for heavy oil releases.
Mineral oil means non-PCB mineral oil, typically used as an insulator and coolant in electrical devices such as transformers and capacitors, measured using NWTPH-Dx. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10). Sites using this cleanup level must also analyze soil samples and meet the soil cleanup level for PCBs, unless it can be demonstrated that: (1) The release originated from an electrical device that was manufactured after July 1, 1979; or (2) oil containing PCBs was never used in the equipment suspected as the source of the release; or (3) it can be documented that the oil released was recently tested and did not contain PCBs. Method B must be used for releases of oils containing greater than 50 ppm PCBs. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for mineral oil releases.
t
1,1,1 Trichloroethane. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
u
Trichloroethylene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
v
Xylenes. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). This is a total value for all xylenes.
Table 745-1
Method A Soil Cleanup Levels for Industrial Properties.a
Hazardous Substance
CAS
Number
Cleanup Level
Arsenic
7440-38-2
20 mg/kgb
Benzene
71-43-2
0.03 mg/kgc
Benzo(a)pyrene
50-32-8
2 mg/kgd
Cadmium
7440-43-9
2 mg/kge
Chromium
 
 
Chromium VI
18540-29-9
19 mg/kgf1
Chromium III
16065-83-1
2,000 mg/kgf2
DDT
50-29-3
4 mg/kgg
Ethylbenzene
100-41-4
6 mg/kgh
Ethylene dibromide (EDB)
106-93-4
0.005 mg/kgi
Lead
7439-92-1
1,000 mg/kgj
Lindane
58-89-9
0.01 mg/kgk
Methylene chloride
75-09-2
0.02 mg/kgl
Mercury (inorganic)
7439-97-6
2 mg/kgm
MTBE
1634-04-4
0.1 mg/kgn
Naphthalene
91-20-3
5 mg/kgo
PAHs (carcinogenic)
 
See benzo(a)pyrened
PCB Mixtures
 
10 mg/kgp
Tetrachloroethylene
127-18-4
0.05 mg/kgq
Toluene
108-88-3
7 mg/kgr
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbonss
 
 
[Note: Must also test for and meet cleanup levels for other petroleum components—see footnotes!]
   Gasoline Range Organics
 
 
Gasoline mixtures without benzene and the total of ethylbenzene, toluene and xylene are less than 1% of the gasoline mixture
 
100 mg/kg
All other gasoline mixtures
 
30 mg/kg
   Diesel Range Organics
 
2,000 mg/kg
   Heavy Oils
 
2,000 mg/kg
   Mineral Oil
 
4,000 mg/kg
1,1,1 Trichloroethane
71-55-6
2 mg/kgt
Trichloroethylene
79-01-6
0.03 mg/kgu
Xylenes
1330-20-7
9 mg/kgv
Footnotes:
 
a
Caution on misusing this table. This table has been developed for specific purposes. It is intended to provide conservative cleanup levels for sites undergoing routine cleanup actions or for industrial properties with relatively few hazardous substances, and the site qualifies under WAC 173-340-7491 for an exclusion from conducting a simplified or site-specific terrestrial ecological evaluation, or it can be demonstrated using a terrestrial ecological evaluation under WAC 173-340-7492 or 173-340-7493 that the values in this table are ecologically protective for the site. This table may not be appropriate for defining cleanup levels at other sites. For these reasons, the values in this table should not automatically be used to define cleanup levels that must be met for financial, real estate, insurance coverage or placement, or similar transactions or purposes. Exceedances of the values in this table do not necessarily mean the soil must be restored to these levels at a site. The level of restoration depends on the remedy selected under WAC 173-340-350 through 173-340-390.
b
Arsenic. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for natural background for soil.
c
Benzene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747 (4) and (6).
d
Benzo(a)pyrene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). If other carcinogenic PAHs are suspected of being present at the site, test for them and use this value as the total concentration that all carcinogenic PAHs must meet using the toxicity equivalency methodology in WAC 173-340-708(8).
e
Cadmium. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit for soil.
f1
Chromium VI. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
f2
Chromium III. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). Chromium VI must also be tested for and the cleanup level met when present at a site.
g
DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
h
Ethylbenzene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
i
Ethylene dibromide (1,2 dibromoethane or EDB). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit for soil.
j
Lead. Cleanup level based on direct contact.
k
Lindane. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4), adjusted for the practical quantitation limit.
l
Methylene chloride (dichloromethane). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
m
Mercury. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
n
Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE). Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
o
Naphthalenes. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4). This is a total value for naphthalene, 1-methyl naphthalene and 2-methyl naphthalene.
p
PCB Mixtures. Cleanup level based on applicable federal law (40 C.F.R. 761.61). This is a total value for all PCBs. This value may be used only if the PCB contaminated soils are capped and the cap maintained as required by 40 C.F.R. 761.61. If this condition cannot be met, the value in Table 740-1 must be used.
q
Tetrachloroethylene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
r
Toluene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedure described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
s
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH). TPH cleanup values have been provided for the most common petroleum products encountered at contaminated sites. Where there is a mixture of products or the product composition is unknown, samples must be tested using both the NWTPH-Gx and NWTPH-Dx methods and the lowest applicable TPH cleanup level must be met.
Gasoline range organics means organic compounds measured using method NWTPH-Gx. Examples are aviation and automotive gasoline. The cleanup level is based on protection of groundwater for noncarcinogenic effects during drinking water use using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(6). Two cleanup levels are provided. The lower value of 30 mg/kg can be used at any site. When using this lower value, the soil must also be tested for and meet the benzene soil cleanup level. The higher value of 100 mg/kg can only be used if the soil is tested and found to contain no benzene and the total of ethylbenzene, toluene and xylene are less than 1% of the gasoline mixture. No interpolation between these cleanup levels is allowed. In both cases, the soil cleanup level for any other carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as EDB and EDC], if present at the site, must also be met. Also, in both cases, soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, naphthalene, and MTBE], also must be met if these substances are found to exceed groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for gasoline releases.
Diesel range organics means organic compounds measured using method NWTPH-Dx. Examples are diesel, kerosene, and #1 and #2 heating oil. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10). The soil cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene, and PAHs], if present at the site, must also be met. Soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and naphthalenes], also must be met if these substances are found to exceed the groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for diesel releases.
Heavy oils means organic compounds measured using NWTPH-Dx. Examples are #6 fuel oil, bunker C oil, hydraulic oil and waste oil. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10) and assuming a product composition similar to diesel fuel. The soil cleanup level for any carcinogenic components of the petroleum [such as benzene, PAHs and PCBs], if present at the site, must also be met. Soil cleanup levels for any noncarcinogenic components [such as toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes and naphthalenes], also must be met if found to exceed the groundwater cleanup levels at the site. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for heavy oil releases.
Mineral oil means non-PCB mineral oil, typically used as an insulator and coolant in electrical devices such as transformers and capacitors, measured using NWTPH-Dx. The cleanup level is based on preventing the accumulation of free product on the groundwater, as described in WAC 173-340-747(10). Sites using this cleanup level must also analyze soil samples and meet the soil cleanup level for PCBs, unless it can be demonstrated that: (1) The release originated from an electrical device that was manufactured after July 1, 1979; or (2) oil containing PCBs was never used in the equipment suspected as the source of the release; or (3) it can be documented that the oil released was recently tested and did not contain PCBs. Method B or C must be used for releases of oils containing greater than 50 ppm PCBs. See Table 830-1 for the minimum testing requirements for mineral oil releases.
t
1,1,1 Trichloroethane. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
u
Trichloroethylene. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedures described in WAC 173-340-747(4).
v
Xylenes. Cleanup level based on protection of groundwater for drinking water use, using the procedure in WAC 173-340-747(4). This is a total value for all xylenes.
Table 747-1
Soil Organic Carbon-Water Partitioning
Coefficient (Koc) Values:
Nonionizing Organics.
Hazardous Substance
Koc (ml/g)
ACENAPHTHENE
4,898
ALDRIN
48,685
ANTHRACENE
23,493
BENZ(a)ANTHRACENE
357,537
BENZENE
62
BENZO(a)PYRENE
968,774
BIS(2-CHLOROETHYL)ETHER
76
BIS(2-ETHYLHEXYL)PHTHALATE
111,123
BROMOFORM
126
BUTYL BENZYL PHTHALATE
13,746
CARBON TETRACHLORIDE
152
CHLORDANE
51,310
CHLOROBENZENE
224
CHLOROFORM
53
DDD
45,800
DDE
86,405
DDT
677,934
DIBENZO(a,h)ANTHRACENE
1,789,101
1,2-DICHLOROBENZENE (o)
379
1,4-DICHLOROBENZENE (p)
616
DICHLOROETHANE-1,1
53
DICHLOROETHANE-1,2
38
DICHLOROETHYLENE-1,1
65
trans-1,2 DICHLOROETHYLENE
38
DICHLOROPROPANE-1,2
47
DICHLOROPROPENE-1,3
27
DIELDRIN
25,546
DIETHYL PHTHALATE
82
DI-N-BUTYLPHTHALATE
1,567
EDB
66
ENDRIN
10,811
ENDOSULFAN
2,040
ETHYL BENZENE
204
FLUORANTHENE
49,096
FLUORENE
7,707
HEPTACHLOR
9,528
HEXACHLOROBENZENE
80,000
α-HCH (α-BHC)
1,762
β-HCH (β-BHC)
2,139
γ-HCH (LINDANE)
1,352
MTBE
11
METHOXYCHLOR
80,000
METHYL BROMIDE
9
METHYL CHLORIDE
6
METHYLENE CHLORIDE
10
NAPHTHALENE
1,191
NITROBENZENE
119
PCB-Arochlor 1016
107,285
PCB-Arochlor 1260
822,422
PENTACHLOROBENZENE
32,148
PYRENE
67,992
STYRENE
912
1,1,2,2,-TETRACHLOROETHANE
79
TETRACHLOROETHYLENE
265
TOLUENE
140
TOXAPHENE
95,816
1,2,4-TRICHLOROBENZENE
1,659
TRICHLOROETHANE -1,1,1
135
TRICHLOROETHANE-1,1,2
75
TRICHLOROETHYLENE
94
o-XYLENE
241
m-XYLENE
196
p-XYLENE
311
Sources:
Except as noted below, the source of the Koc values is the 1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document. The values obtained from this document represent the geometric mean of a survey of values published in the scientific literature. Sample populations ranged from 1-65. EDB value from ATSDR Toxicological Profile (TP 91/13). MTBE value from USGS Final Draft Report on Fuel Oxygenates (March 1996). PCB-Arochlor values from 1994 EPA Draft Soil Screening Guidance.
Table 747-2
Predicted Soil Organic Carbon-Water
Partitioning Coefficient (Koc) as a
Function of pH: Ionizing Organics.
Hazardous Substance
 
Koc Value (ml/g)
 
pH = 4.9
pH = 6.8
pH = 8.0
Benzoic acid
5.5
0.6
0.5
2-Chlorophenol
398
388
286
2-4-Dichlorophenol
159
147
72
2-4-Dinitrophenol
0.03
0.01
0.01
Pentachlorophenol
9,055
592
410
2,3,4,5-Tetrachlorophenol
17,304
4,742
458
2,3,4,6-Tetrachlorophenol
4,454
280
105
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
2,385
1,597
298
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
1,040
381
131
Source:
1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document. The predicted Koc values in this table were derived using a relationship from thermodynamic equilibrium considerations to predict the total sorption of an ionizable organic compound from the partitioning of its ionized and neutral forms.
Table 747-3
Metals Distribution Coefficients (Kd).
Hazardous Substance
Kd (L/kg)
Arsenic
29
Cadmium
6.7
Total Chromium
1,000
Chromium VI
19
Copper
22
Mercury
52
Nickel
65
Lead
10,000
Selenium
5
Zinc
62
Source:
Multiple sources compiled by the department of ecology.
Table 747-4
Petroleum EC Fraction Physical/Chemical Values.
Fuel
Fraction
Equivalent
Carbon
Number1
Water
Solubility2
(mg/L)
Mol.
Wt.3
(g/mol)
Henry's
Constant4
(cc/cc)
GFW5
(mg/mol)
Density6
(mg/l)
Soil Organic
Carbon-Water
Partitioning
Coefficient
Koc7 (L/kg)
ALIPHATICS
EC 5 - 6
5.5
36.0
81.0
33.0
81,000
670,000
800
EC ˃ 6 - 8
7.0
5.4
100.0
50.0
100,000
700,000
3,800
EC ˃ 8 - 10
9.0
0.43
130.0
80.0
130,000
730,000
30,200
EC ˃ 10 - 12
11.0
0.034
160.0
120.0
160,000
750,000
234,000
EC ˃ 12 - 16
14.0
7.6E-04
200.0
520.0
200,000
770,000
5.37E+06
EC ˃ 16 - 21
19.0
1.3E-06
270.0
4,900
270,000
780,000
9.55E+09
EC ˃ 21 - 34
28.0
1.5E-11
400.0
100,000
400,000
790,000
1.07E+10
AROMATICS
EC ˃ 8 - 10
9.0
65.0
120.0
0.48
120,000
870,000
1,580
EC ˃ 10 - 12
11.0
25.0
130.0
0.14
130,000
900,000
2,510
EC ˃ 12 - 16
14.0
5.8
150.0
0.053
150,000
1,000,000
5,010
EC ˃ 16 - 21
19.0
0.51
190.0
0.013
190,000
1,160,000
15,800
EC ˃ 21 - 34
28.0
6.6E-03
240.0
6.7E-04
240,000
1,300,000
126,000
TPH COMPONENTS
Benzene
6.5
1,750
78.0
0.228
78,000
876,500
62.0
Toluene
7.6
526.0
92.0
0.272
92,000
866,900
140.0
Ethylbenzene
8.5
169.0
106.0
0.323
106,000
867,000
204.0
Total Xylenes8 (average of 3)
8.67
171.0
106.0
0.279
106,000
875,170
233.0
n-Hexane9
6.0
9.5
86.0
74.0
86,000
659,370
3,410
MTBE10
 
50,000
88.0
0.018
88,000
744,000
10.9
Naphthalenes
11.69
31.0
128.0
0.0198
128,000
1,145,000
1,191
Sources:
 
1
Equivalent Carbon Number. Gustafson, J.B. et al., Selection of Representative TPH Fractions Based on Fate and Transport Considerations. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbon Criteria Working Group Series, Volume 3 (1997) [hereinafter Criteria Working Group].
2
Water Solubility. For aliphatics and aromatics EC groups, Criteria Working Group. For TPH components except n-hexane and MTBE, 1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document.
3
Molecular Weight. Criteria Working Group.
4
Henry's Constant. For aliphatics and aromatics EC groups, Criteria Working Group. For TPH components except n-hexane and MTBE, 1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document.
5
Gram Formula Weight (GFW). Based on 1000 x Molecular Weight.
6
Density. For aliphatics and aromatics EC groups, based on correlation between equivalent carbon number and data on densities of individual hazardous substances provided in Criteria Working Group. For TPH components except n-hexane and MTBE, 1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document.
7
Soil Organic Carbon-Water Partitioning Coefficient. For aliphatics and aromatics EC groups, Criteria Working Group. For TPH components except n-hexane and MTBE, 1996 EPA Soil Screening Guidance: Technical Background Document.
8
Total Xylenes. Values for total xylenes are a weighted average of m, o and p xylene based on gasoline composition data from the Criteria Working Group (m = 51% of total xylene; o = 28% of total xylene; and p = 21% of total xylene).
9
n-Hexane. For values other than density, Criteria Working Group. For the density value, Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed., revised by N. Irving Sax and Richard J. Lewis (1987).
10
MTBE. USGS Final Report on Fuel Oxygenates (March 1996).
Table 747-5
Residual Saturation Screening Levels
for TPH.
Fuel
Screening Level (mg/kg)
Weathered Gasoline
1,000
Middle Distillates
(e.g., Diesel No. 2 Fuel Oil)
2,000
Heavy Fuel Oils
(e.g., No. 6 Fuel Oil)
2,000
Mineral Oil
4,000
Unknown Composition or Type
1,000
Note:
The residual saturation screening levels for petroleum hydrocarbons specified in Table 747-5 are based on coarse sand and gravelly soils; however, they may be used for any soil type. Screening levels are based on the presumption that there are no preferential pathways for NAPL to flow downward to groundwater. If such pathways exist, more stringent residual saturation screening levels may need to be established.
Table 749-1
Simplified Terrestrial Ecological
Evaluation - Exposure Analysis Procedure
under WAC 173-340-7492 (2)(a)(ii).a
Estimate the area of contiguous (connected) undeveloped land on the site or within 500 feet of any area of the site to the nearest 1/2 acre (1/4 acre if the area is less than 0.5 acre). "Undeveloped land" means land that is not covered by existing buildings, roads, paved areas or other barriers that will prevent wildlife from feeding on plants, earthworms, insects or other food in or on the soil.
1) From the table below, find the number of points corresponding to the area and enter this number in the box to the right.
 
Area (acres)
Points
 
0.25 or less
4
 
 
0.5
5
 
 
1.0
6
 
 
1.5
7
 
 
2.0
8
 
 
2.5
9
 
 
3.0
10
 
 
3.5
11
 
 
4.0 or more
12
 
2) Is this an industrial or commercial property?
See WAC 173-340-7490 (3)(c). If yes, enter a score of 3 in the box to the right. If no, enter a score of 1.
3) Enter a score in the box to the right for the habitat quality of the site, using the rating system shown belowb. (High = 1, Intermediate = 2, Low = 3)
4) Is the undeveloped land likely to attract wildlife? If yes, enter a score of 1 in the box to the right. If no, enter a score of 2. See footnote c.
5) Are there any of the following soil contaminants present:
Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans, PCB mixtures, DDT, DDE, DDD, aldrin, chlordane, dieldrin, endosulfan, endrin, heptachlor, benzene hexachloride, toxaphene, hexachlorobenzene, pentachlorophenol, pentachlorobenzene? If yes, enter a score of 1 in the box to the right. If no, enter a score of 4.
6) Add the numbers in the boxes on lines 2 through 5 and enter this number in the box to the right. If this number is larger than the number in the box on line 1, the simplified terrestrial ecological evaluation may be ended under WAC 173-340-7492 (2)(a)(ii).
Footnotes:
 
a
It is expected that this habitat evaluation will be undertaken by an experienced field biologist. If this is not the case, enter a conservative score (1) for questions 3 and 4.
b
Habitat rating system. Rate the quality of the habitat as high, intermediate or low based on your professional judgment as a field biologist. The following are suggested factors to consider in making this evaluation:
 
Low: Early successional vegetative stands; vegetation predominantly noxious, nonnative, exotic plant species or weeds. Areas severely disturbed by human activity, including intensively cultivated croplands. Areas isolated from other habitat used by wildlife.
 
High: Area is ecologically significant for one or more of the following reasons: Late-successional native plant communities present; relatively high species diversity; used by an uncommon or rare species; priority habitat (as defined by the Washington department of fish and wildlife); part of a larger area of habitat where size or fragmentation may be important for the retention of some species.
 
Intermediate: Area does not rate as either high or low.
c
Indicate "yes" if the area attracts wildlife or is likely to do so. Examples: Birds frequently visit the area to feed; evidence of high use by mammals (tracks, scat, etc.); habitat "island" in an industrial area; unusual features of an area that make it important for feeding animals; heavy use during seasonal migrations.
Table 749-2
Priority Contaminants of Ecological Concern for Sites that Qualify for the Simplified Terrestrial Ecological Evaluation
Procedure.a
Priority contaminant
Soil concentration (mg/kg)
 
Unrestricted
land useb
Industrial or
commercial site
METALSc
Antimony
See note d
See note d
Arsenic III
20 mg/kg
20 mg/kg
Arsenic V
95 mg/kg
260 mg/kg
Barium
1,250 mg/kg
1,320 mg/kg
Beryllium
25 mg/kg
See note d
Cadmium
25 mg/kg
36 mg/kg
Chromium (total)
42 mg/kg
135 mg/kg
Cobalt
See note d
See note d
Copper
100 mg/kg
550 mg/kg
Lead
220 mg/kg
220 mg/kg
Magnesium
See note d
See note d
Manganese
See note d
23,500 mg/kg
Mercury, inorganic
9 mg/kg
9 mg/kg
Mercury, organic
0.7 mg/kg
0.7 mg/kg
Molybdenum
See note d
71 mg/kg
Nickel
100 mg/kg
1,850 mg/kg
Selenium
0.8 mg/kg
0.8 mg/kg
Silver
See note d
See note d
Tin
275 mg/kg
See note d
Vanadium
26 mg/kg
See note d
Zinc
270 mg/kg
570 mg/kg
PESTICIDES
Aldicarb/aldicarb sulfone (total)
See note d
See note d
Aldrin
0.17 mg/kg
0.17 mg/kg
Benzene hexachloride (including lindane)
10 mg/kg
10 mg/kg
Carbofuran
See note d
See note d
Chlordane
1 mg/kg
7 mg/kg
Chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos-methyl (total)
See note d
See note d
DDT/DDD/DDE (total)
1 mg/kg
1 mg/kg
Dieldrin
0.17 mg/kg
0.17 mg/kg
Endosulfan
See note d
See note d
Endrin
0.4 mg/kg
0.4 mg/kg
Heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide (total)
0.6 mg/kg
0.6 mg/kg
Hexachlorobenzene
31 mg/kg
31 mg/kg
Parathion/methyl parathion (total)
See note d
See note d
Pentachlorophenol
11 mg/kg
11 mg/kg
Toxaphene
See note d
See note d
OTHER CHLORINATED ORGANICS
Chlorinated dibenzofurans (total)
3E-06 mg/kg
3E-06 mg/kg
Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (total)
5E-06 mg/kg
5E-06 mg/kg
Hexachlorophene
See note d
See note d
PCB mixtures (total)
2 mg/kg
2 mg/kg
Pentachlorobenzene
168 mg/kg
See note d
OTHER NONCHLORINATED ORGANICS
Acenaphthene
See note d
See note d
Benzo(a)pyrene
30 mg/kg
300 mg/kg
Bis (2-ethylhexyl) phthalate
See note d
See note d
Di-n-butyl phthalate
200 mg/kg
See note d
PETROLEUM
Gasoline Range Organics
200 mg/kg
12,000 mg/kg except that the concentration shall not exceed residual saturation at the soil surface.
Diesel Range Organics
460 mg/kg
15,000 mg/kg except that the concentration shall not exceed residual saturation at the soil surface.
Footnotes:
 
a
Caution on misusing these chemical concentration numbers. These values have been developed for use at sites where a site-specific terrestrial ecological evaluation is not required. They are not intended to be protective of terrestrial ecological receptors at every site. Exceedances of the values in this table do not necessarily trigger requirements for cleanup action under this chapter. The table is not intended for purposes such as evaluating sludges or wastes.
 
This list does not imply that sampling must be conducted for each of these chemicals at every site. Sampling should be conducted for those chemicals that might be present based on available information, such as current and past uses of chemicals at the site.
b
Applies to any site that does not meet the definition of industrial or commercial.
c
For arsenic, use the valence state most likely to be appropriate for site conditions, unless laboratory information is available. Where soil conditions alternate between saturated, anaerobic and unsaturated, aerobic states, resulting in the alternating presence of arsenic III and arsenic V, the arsenic III concentrations shall apply.
d
Safe concentration has not yet been established. See WAC 173-340-7492 (2)(c).
Table 749-3
Ecological Indicator Soil Concentrations (mg/kg) for Protection of Terrestrial Plants and Animalsa. For chemicals where a value is not provided, see footnote b.
Note: These values represent soil concentrations that are expected to be protective at any MTCA site and are provided for use in eliminating hazardous substances from further consideration under WAC 173-340-7493 (2)(a)(i). Where these values are exceeded, various options are provided for demonstrating that the hazardous substance does not pose a threat to ecological receptors at a site, or for developing site-specific remedial standards for eliminating threats to ecological receptors. See WAC 173-340-7493 (1)(b)(i), 173-340-7493 (2)(a)(ii) and 173-340-7493(3).
Hazardous
Substanceb
Plantsc
Soil biotad
Wildlifee
METALSf:
Aluminum (soluble salts)
50
 
 
Antimony
5
 
 
Arsenic III
 
 
7
Arsenic V
10
60
132
Barium
500
 
102
Beryllium
10
 
 
Boron
0.5
 
 
Bromine
10
 
 
Cadmium
4
20
14
Chromium (total)
42g
42g
67
Cobalt
20
 
 
Copper
100
50
217
Fluorine
200
 
 
Iodine
4
 
 
Lead
50
500
118
Lithium
35g
 
 
Manganese
1,100g
 
1,500
Mercury, inorganic
0.3
0.1
5.5
Mercury, organic
 
 
0.4
Molybdenum
2
 
7
Nickel
30
200
980
Selenium
1
70
0.3
Silver
2
 
 
Technetium
0.2
 
 
Thallium
1
 
 
Tin
50
 
 
Uranium
5
 
 
Vanadium
2
 
 
Zinc
86g
200
360
PESTICIDES:
Aldrin
 
 
0.1
Benzene hexachloride (including lindane)
 
 
6
Chlordane
 
1
2.7
DDT/DDD/DDE (total)
 
 
0.75
Dieldrin
 
 
0.07
Endrin
 
 
0.2
Hexachlorobenzene
 
 
17
Heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide (total)
 
 
0.4
Pentachlorophenol
3
6
4.5
OTHER CHLORINATED ORGANICS:
1,2,3,4-Tetrachlorobenzene
 
10
 
1,2,3-Trichlorobenzene
 
20
 
1,2,4-Trichlorobenzene
 
20
 
1,2-Dichloropropane
 
700
 
1,4-Dichlorobenzene
 
20
 
2,3,4,5-Tetrachlorophenol
 
20
 
2,3,5,6-Tetrachloroaniline
20
20
 
2,4,5-Trichloroaniline
20
20
 
2,4,5-Trichlorophenol
4
9
 
2,4,6-Trichlorophenol
 
10
 
2,4-Dichloroaniline
 
100
 
3,4-Dichloroaniline
 
20
 
3,4-Dichlorophenol
20
20
 
3-Chloroaniline
20
30
 
3-Chlorophenol
7
10
 
Chlorinated dibenzofurans (total)
 
 
2E-06
Chloroacetamide
 
2
 
Chlorobenzene
 
40
 
Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (total)
 
 
2E-06
Hexachlorocyclopentadiene
10
 
 
PCB mixtures (total)
40
 
0.65
Pentachloroaniline
 
100
 
Pentachlorobenzene
 
20
 
OTHER NONCHLORINATED ORGANICS:
2,4-Dinitrophenol
20
 
 
4-Nitrophenol
 
7
 
Acenaphthene
20
 
 
Benzo(a)pyrene
 
 
12
Biphenyl
60
 
 
Diethylphthalate
100
 
 
Dimethylphthalate
 
200
 
Di-n-butyl phthalate
200
 
 
Fluorene
 
30
 
Furan
600
 
 
Nitrobenzene
 
40
 
N-nitrosodiphenylamine
 
20
 
Phenol
70
30
 
Styrene
300
 
 
Toluene
200
 
 
PETROLEUM:
Gasoline Range Organics
 
100
5,000 mg/kg except that the concentration shall not exceed residual saturation at the soil surface.
Diesel Range Organics
 
200
6,000 mg/kg except that the concentration shall not exceed residual saturation at the soil surface.
Footnotes:
 
a
Caution on misusing ecological indicator concentrations. Exceedances of the values in this table do not necessarily trigger requirements for cleanup action under this chapter. Natural background concentrations may be substituted for ecological indicator concentrations provided in this table. The table is not intended for purposes such as evaluating sludges or wastes.
 
This list does not imply that sampling must be conducted for each of these chemicals at every site. Sampling should be conducted for those chemicals that might be present based on available information, such as current and past uses of chemicals at the site.
b
For hazardous substances where a value is not provided, plant and soil biota indicator concentrations shall be based on a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4) and calculated using methods described in the publications listed below in footnotes c and d. Methods to be used for developing wildlife indicator concentrations are described in Tables 749-4 and 749-5.
c
Based on benchmarks published in Toxicological Benchmarks for Screening Potential Contaminants of Concern for Effects on Terrestrial Plants: 1997 Revision, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1997.
d
Based on benchmarks published in Toxicological Benchmarks for Potential Contaminants of Concern for Effects on Soil and Litter Invertebrates and Heterotrophic Process, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1997.
e
Calculated using the exposure model provided in Table 749-4 and chemical-specific values provided in Table 749-5. Where both avian and mammalian values are available, the wildlife value is the lower of the two.
f
For arsenic, use the valence state most likely to be appropriate for site conditions, unless laboratory information is available. Where soil conditions alternate between saturated, anaerobic and unsaturated, aerobic states, resulting in the alternating presence of arsenic III and arsenic V, the arsenic III concentrations shall apply.
g
Benchmark replaced by Washington state natural background concentration.
Table 749-4
Wildlife Exposure Model for Site-specific Evaluations.a
Plant
KPlant
Plant uptake coefficient (dry weight basis)
 
Units: mg/kg plant/mg/kg soil
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
Soil biota
Surrogate receptor: Earthworm
BAFWorm
Earthworm bioaccumulation factor (dry weight basis)
 
Units: mg/kg worm/mg/kg soil
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
Mammalian predator
Surrogate receptor: Shrew (Sorex)
PSB (shrew)
Proportion of contaminated food (earthworms) in shrew diet
 
Units: unitless
 
Value: 0.50
FIRShrew, DW
Food ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry food/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.45
SIRShrew, DW
Soil ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry soil/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.0045
RGAFSoil, shrew
Gut absorption factor for a hazardous substance in soil expressed relative to the gut absorption factor for the hazardous substance in food.
 
Units: unitless
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
TShrew
Toxicity reference value for shrew
 
Units: mg/kg - day
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
Home range
0.1 Acres
Avian predator
Surrogate receptor: American robin (Turdus migratorius)
PSB (Robin)
Proportion of contaminated food (soil biota) in robin diet
 
Unit: unitless
 
Value: 0.52
FIRRobin, DW
Food ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry food/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.207
SIRRobin, DW
Soil ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry soil/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.0215
RGAFSoil, robin
Gut absorption factor for a hazardous substance in soil expressed relative to the gut absorption factor for the hazardous substance in food.
 
Units: unitless
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
TRobin
Toxicity reference value for robin
 
Units: mg/kg - day
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
Home range
0.6 Acres
Mammalian herbivore
Surrogate receptor: Vole (Microtus)
PPlant, vole
Proportion of contaminated food (plants) in vole diet
 
Units: unitless
 
Value: 1.0
FIRVole, DW
Food ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry food/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.315
SIRVole, DW
Soil ingestion rate (dry weight basis)
 
Units: kg dry soil/kg body weight - day
 
Value: 0.0079
RGAFSoil, vole
Gut absorption factor for a hazardous substance in soil expressed relative to the gut absorption factor for the hazardous substance in food.
 
Units: unitless
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
TVole
Toxicity reference value for vole
 
Units: mg/kg - day
 
Value: chemical-specific (see Table 749-5)
Home range
0.08 Acres
Soil concentrations for wildlife protectionb
(1) Mammalian predator:
SCMP = (TShrew)/[(FIRShrew, DW x PSB (shrew) x BAFWorm) + (SIRShrew, DW x RGAFSoil, shrew)]
(2) Avian predator:
SCAP = (TRobin)/[(FIRRobin, DW x PSB (Robin) x BAFWorm) + (SIRRobin, DW x RGAFSoil, robin)]
(3) Mammalian herbivore:
SCMH = (TVole)/[(FIRVole, DW x PPlant, vole x KPlant) + (SIRVole, DW x RGAFSoil, vole)]
Footnotes:
 
a
Substitutions for default receptors may be made as provided for in WAC 173-340-7493(7). If a substitute species is used, the values for food and soil ingestion rates, and proportion of contaminated food in the diet, may be modified to reasonable maximum exposure estimates for the substitute species based on a literature search conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4).
 
Additional species may be added on a site-specific basis as provided in WAC 173-340-7493 (2)(a).
 
The department shall consider proposals for modifications to default values provided in this table based on new scientific information in accordance with WAC 173-340-702(14).
b
Use the lowest of the three concentrations calculated as the wildlife value.
Table 749-5
Default Values for Selected Hazardous Substances for use with the Wildlife Exposure Model in Table 749-4.a
 
Toxicity reference value (mg/kg - d)
Hazardous Substance
BAFWorm
KPlant
Shrew
Vole
Robin
METALS:
 
 
 
 
 
Arsenic III
1.16
0.06
1.89
1.15
 
Arsenic V
1.16
0.06
35
35
22
Barium
0.36
 
43.5
33.3
 
Cadmium
4.6
0.14
15
15
20
Chromium
0.49
 
35.2
29.6
5
Copper
0.88
0.020
44
33.6
61.7
Lead
0.69
0.0047
20
20
11.3
Manganese
0.29
 
624
477
 
Mercury, inorganic
1.32
0.0854
2.86
2.18
0.9
Mercury, organic
1.32
 
0.352
0.27
0.064
Molybdenum
0.48
1.01
3.09
2.36
35.3
Nickel
0.78
0.047
175.8
134.4
107
Selenium
10.5
0.0065
0.725
0.55
1
Zinc
3.19
0.095
703.3
537.4
131
PESTICIDES:
 
 
 
 
 
Aldrine
4.77
0.007b
2.198
1.68
0.06
Benzene hexachloride (including lindane)
10.1
 
 
 
7
Chlordane
17.8
0.011b
10.9
8.36
10.7
DDT/DDD/DDE
10.6
0.004b
8.79
6.72
0.87
Dieldrin
28.8
0.029b
0.44
0.34
4.37
Endrin
3.6
0.038b
1.094
0.836
0.1
Heptachlor/heptachlor epoxide
10.9
0.027b
2.857
2.18
0.48
Hexachlorobenzene
1.08
 
 
 
2.4
Pentachlorophenol
5.18
0.043b
5.275
4.03
 
OTHER CHLORINATED ORGANICS:
 
 
 
 
 
Chlorinated dibenzofurans
48
 
 
 
1.0E-05
Chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins
48
0.005b
2.2E-05
1.7E-05
1.4E-04
PCB mixtures
4.58
0.087b
0.668
0.51
1.8
OTHER NONCHLORINATED ORGANICS:
 
 
 
 
 
Benzo(a)pyrene
0.43
0.011
1.19
0.91
 
Footnotes:
 
a
For hazardous substances not shown in this table, use the following default values. Alternatively, use values established from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4) and approved by the department.
KPlant:
Metals (including metalloid elements): 1.01
 
Organic chemicals: KPlant = 10(1.588-(0.578log Kow)),
 
where log Kow is the logarithm of the octanol-water partition coefficient.
BAFWorm:
Metals (including metalloid elements): 4.6
 
Nonchlorinated organic chemicals:
 
log Kow < 5: 0.7
 
log Kow ˃ 5: 0.9
 
Chlorinated organic chemicals:
 
log Kow < 5: 4.7
 
log Kow ˃ 5: 11.8
RGAFSoil
(all receptors): 1.0
 
Toxicity reference values (all receptors): Values established from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4).
 
Site-specific values may be substituted for default values, as described below:
KPlant
Value from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4) or from empirical studies at the site.
BAFWorm
Value from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4) or from empirical studies at the site.
RGAFSoil
(all receptors): Value established from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4).
 
Toxicity reference values (all receptors): Default toxicity reference values provided in this table may be replaced by a value established from a literature survey conducted in accordance with WAC 173-340-7493(4).
b
Calculated from log Kow using formula in footnote a.
Table 830-1
Required Testing for Petroleum Releases.
 
Gasoline Range
Organics (GRO) (1)
Diesel Range Organics (DRO) (2)
Heavy Oils (DRO) (3)
Mineral Oils (4)
Waste Oils and Unknown Oils (5)
Volatile Petroleum Compounds
Benzene
X (6)
X (7)
 
 
X (8)
Toluene
X (6)
X (7)
 
 
X (8)
Ethyl benzene
X (6)
X (7)
 
 
X (8)
Xylenes
X (6)
X (7)
 
 
X (8)
n-Hexane
X (9)
 
 
 
 
Fuel Additives and Blending Compounds
Dibromoethane, 1-2 (EDB); and Dichloroethane, 1-2 (EDC)
X (10)
 
 
 
X (8)
Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE)
X (11)
 
 
 
X (8)
Total lead & other additives
X (12)
 
 
 
X (8)
Other Petroleum Components
Carcinogenic PAHs
 
X (13)
X (13)
 
X (8)
Naphthalenes
X (14)
X (14)
X (14)
 
X (14)
Other Compounds
Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)
 
 
X (15)
X (15)
X (8)
Halogenated Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)
 
 
 
 
X (8)
Other
X (16)
X (16)
X (16)
X (16)
X (16)
Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons Methods
TPH Analytical Method for Total TPH (Method A Cleanup Levels) (17)
NWTPH-Gx
NWTPH-Dx
NWTPH-Dx
NWTPH-Dx
NWTPH-Gx & NWTPH-Dx
TPH Analytical Methods for TPH fractions (Methods B or C) (17)
VPH
EPH
EPH
EPH
VPH and EPH
Use of Table 830-1: An "X" in the box means that the testing requirement applies to groundwater and soil if a release is known or suspected to have occurred to that medium, unless otherwise specified in the footnotes. A box with no "X" indicates (except in the last two rows) that, for the type of petroleum product release indicated in the top row, analyses for the hazardous substance(s) named in the far-left column corresponding to the empty box are not typically required as part of the testing for petroleum releases. However, such analyses may be required based on other site-specific information. Note that testing for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is required for every type of petroleum release, as indicated in the bottom two rows of the table. The testing method for TPH depends on the type of petroleum product released and whether Method A or Method B or C is being used to determine TPH cleanup levels. See WAC 173-340-830 for analytical procedures. The footnotes to this table are important for understanding the specific analytical requirements for petroleum releases.
Footnotes:
 
(1)
The following petroleum products are common examples of GRO: automotive and aviation gasolines, mineral spirits, stoddard solvents, and naphtha. To be in this range, 90 percent of the petroleum components need to be quantifiable using the NWTPH-Gx; if NWTPH-HCID results are used for this determination, then 90 percent of the "area under the TPH curve” must be quantifiable using NWTPH-Gx. Products such as jet fuel, diesel No. 1, kerosene, and heating oil may require analysis as both GRO and DRO depending on the range of petroleum components present (range can be measured by NWTPH-HCID). (See footnote 17 on analytical methods.)
(2)
The following petroleum products are common examples of DRO: Diesel No. 2, fuel oil No. 2, light oil (including some bunker oils). To be in this range, 90 percent of the petroleum components need to be quantifiable using the NWTPH-Dx quantified against a diesel standard. Products such as jet fuel, diesel No. 1, kerosene, and heating oil may require analysis as both GRO and DRO depending on the range of petroleum components present as measured in NWTPH-HCID.
(3)
The following petroleum products are common examples of the heavy oil group: Motor oils, lube oils, hydraulic fluids, etc. Heavier oils may require the addition of an appropriate oil range standard for quantification.
(4)
Mineral oil means non-PCB mineral oil, typically used as an insulator and coolant in electrical devices such as transformers and capacitors.
(5)
The waste oil category applies to waste oil, oily wastes, and unknown petroleum products and mixtures of petroleum and nonpetroleum substances. Analysis of other chemical components (such as solvents) than those listed may be required based on site-specific information. Mixtures of identifiable petroleum products (such as gasoline and diesel, or diesel and motor oil) may be analyzed based on the presence of the individual products, and need not be treated as waste and unknown oils.
(6)
When using Method A, testing soil for benzene is required. Furthermore, testing groundwater for BTEX is necessary when a petroleum release to groundwater is known or suspected. If the groundwater is tested and toluene, ethyl benzene or xylene is in the groundwater above its respective Method A cleanup level, the soil must also be tested for that chemical. When using Method B or C, testing the soil for BTEX is required and testing for BTEX in groundwater is required when a release to groundwater is known or suspected.
(7)(a)
For DRO releases from other than home heating oil systems, follow the instructions for GRO releases in Footnote (6).
(b)
For DRO releases from typical home heating oil systems (systems of 1,100 gallons or less storing heating oil for residential consumptive use on the premises where stored), testing for BTEX is not usually required for either groundwater or soil. Testing of the groundwater is also not usually required for these systems; however, if the groundwater is tested and benzene is found in the groundwater, the soil must be tested for benzene.
(8)
Testing is required in a sufficient number of samples to determine whether this chemical is present at concentrations of concern. If the chemical is found to be at levels below the applicable cleanup level, then no further analysis is required.
(9)
Testing for n-hexane is required when VPH analysis is performed for Method B or C. In this case, the concentration of n-hexane should be deleted from its respective fraction to avoid double-counting its concentration. n-Hexane's contribution to overall toxicity is then evaluated using its own reference dose.
(10)
Volatile fuel additives (such as dibromoethane, 1 - 2 (EDB) (CAS# 106-93-4) and dichloroethane, 1 - 2 (EDC) (CAS# 107-06-2)) must be part of a volatile organics analysis (VOA) of GRO contaminated groundwater. If any is found in groundwater, then the contaminated soil must also be tested for these chemicals.
(11)
Methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) (CAS# 1634-04-4) must be analyzed in GRO contaminated groundwater. If any is found in groundwater, then the contaminated soil must also be tested for MTBE.
(12)(a)
For automotive gasoline where the release occurred prior to 1996 (when "leaded gasoline" was used), testing for lead is required unless it can be demonstrated that lead was not part of the release. If this demonstration cannot be made, testing is required in a sufficient number of samples to determine whether lead is present at concentrations of concern. Other additives and blending compounds of potential environmental significance may need to be considered for testing, including: tertiary-butyl alcohol (TBA); tertiary-amyl methyl ether (TAME); ethyl tertiary-butyl ether (ETBE); ethanol; and methanol. Contact the department for additional testing recommendations regarding these and other additives and blending compounds.
(b)
For aviation gasoline, racing fuels and similar products, testing is required for likely fuel additives (especially lead) and likely blending compounds, no matter when the release occurred.
(13)
Testing for carcinogenic PAHs is required for DRO and heavy oils, except for the following products for which adequate information exists to indicate their absence: Diesel No. 1 and 2, home heating oil, kerosene, jet fuels, and electrical insulating mineral oils. The carcinogenic PAHs include benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene, indeno(1,2,3-cd)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, benzo(a)anthracene, and benzo(b)fluoranthene.
(14)(a)
Except as noted in (b) and (c), testing for the noncarcinogenic PAHs, including the "naphthalenes" (naphthalene, 1-methyl-naphthalene, and 2-methyl-naphthalene) is not required when using Method A cleanup levels, because they are included in the TPH cleanup level.
(b)
Testing of soil for naphthalenes is required under Methods B and C when the inhalation exposure pathway is evaluated.
(c)
If naphthalenes are found in groundwater, then the soil must also be tested for naphthalenes.
(15)
Testing for PCBs is required unless it can be demonstrated that: (1) The release originated from an electrical device manufactured for use in the United States after July 1, 1979; (2) oil containing PCBs was never used in the equipment suspected as the source of the release (examples of equipment where PCBs are likely to be found include transformers, electric motors, hydraulic systems, heat transfer systems, electromagnets, compressors, capacitors, switches and miscellaneous other electrical devices); or, (3) the oil released was recently tested and did not contain PCBs.
(16)
Testing for other possible chemical contaminants may be required based on site-specific information.
(17)
The analytical methods NWTPH-Gx, NWTPH-Dx, NWTPH-HCID, VPH, and EPH are methods published by the department of ecology and available on the department's internet web site: http://www.ecy.wa.gov/programs/tcp/cleanup.html.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 70.105D.030(2). WSR 07-21-065 (Order 06-10), § 173-340-900, filed 10/12/07, effective 11/12/07. Statutory Authority: Chapter 70.105D RCW. WSR 01-05-024 (Order 97-09A), § 173-340-900, filed 2/12/01, effective 8/15/01.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.