Chapter 28A.630 RCW

TEMPORARY PROVISIONSSPECIAL PROJECTS

Sections

28A.630.002Condensed compliance reportsSecond-class districts.
LANGUAGE ACCESS WORK GROUP
28A.630.097Language access work group.
WORK-INTEGRATED LEARNING
28A.630.135Work-integrated learning.
REGIONAL EDUCATOR RECRUITMENT PROGRAM
28A.630.195Regional educator recruitment program.
EDUCATIONAL SERVICE DISTRICT
ALTERNATIVE ROUTE PILOT PROGRAM
28A.630.197Educational service district alternative route pilot program.
TEACHER PREPARATION PROGRAMS
28A.630.198Teacher preparation programsReport.
DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL PARAPROFESSIONAL
TRAINING PROGRAM
28A.630.400Paraeducator associate of arts degree.
RUNNING START SUMMER SCHOOL PILOT PROGRAM
28A.630.600Running start summer school pilot program.
AT-RISK STUDENTS
28A.630.810Rules.


Condensed compliance reportsSecond-class districts.

Any compliance reporting requirements as a result of laws in this chapter that apply to second-class districts may be submitted in accordance with RCW 28A.330.250.

NOTES:

Conflict with federal requirements2011 c 45: See note following RCW 28A.330.250.



Language access work group. (Expires December 31, 2020.)

(1) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the office of the education ombuds must jointly convene a work group to improve meaningful, equitable access for public school students and their family members who have language access barriers.
(2) The work group must advise the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the Washington state school directors' association on the following topics:
(a) The elements of an effective language access program for systemic family engagement and a plan for the implementation of this program;
(b) The components of a technical assistance program for language access and a plan for the implementation of this program;
(c) The development and sharing of a tool kit to help public schools:
(i) Assess the language needs of their communities; and
(ii) Develop, implement, and evaluate their language access plans and language services;
(d) The development and sharing of educational terminology glossaries that improve all families' access to the public school system; and
(e) The development and sharing of best practices or strategies for improving meaningful, equitable access for public school students and their family members who have language access barriers, including effective use of interpreters and when to provide translated documents in other formats.
(3) The work group must develop recommendations for practices and policies that should be adopted at the state or local level to improve meaningful, equitable access for public school students and their family members who have language access barriers, including recommendations on the following topics:
(a) Standards for interpreters working in education settings, including familiarity with legal concepts related to, and service requirements of, Part B of the federal individuals with disabilities education improvement act and section 504 of the federal rehabilitation act of 1973;
(b) Development and assessment of interpreters' knowledge of education terminology;
(c) The feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adapting another state agency's interpreter program to test, train, or both, interpreters for educational purposes;
(d) Updates to the Washington state school directors' association's model language access policy;
(e) Use of remote interpreter services, including the conditions under which remote interpreter services may be used to provide high quality interpreter services; and
(f) Data collection and use necessary to create and improve state and local language access programs.
(4) The office of the superintendent of public instruction and the office of the education ombuds must select up to twenty-five work group members who:
(a) Are geographically diverse and represent people with a variety of language access barriers; and
(b) Represent the following groups: The educational opportunity gap oversight and accountability committee; the state school for the blind; the childhood center for deafness and hearing loss; the special education advisory council at the office of the superintendent of public instruction; the Washington state school directors' association; a state association of teachers; a state association of principals; a state association of parents; the Washington state commissions on African American affairs, Asian Pacific American affairs, and Hispanic affairs; the governor's office of Indian affairs; interpreters working in education settings; interpreter unions; families with language access barriers; and community-based organizations supporting families with language access barriers.
(5) The office of the superintendent of public instruction and the office of the education ombuds must provide staff support to the work group.
(6) The work group may form subcommittees and consult with necessary experts.
(7) By October 1, 2020, and in compliance with RCW 43.01.036, the work group must report its findings and recommendations to the appropriate committees of the legislature.
(8) This section expires December 31, 2020.

NOTES:

Findings2019 c 256: See note following RCW 28A.155.230.



Work-integrated learning.

(1) The work-integrated learning initiative is established. The purpose of the initiative is to promote work-integrated learning experiences for students by providing:
(a) An opportunity for students to engage in work-based academic programs with public and private sector employers, such as internships, externships, and registered apprenticeships; and
(b) A framework for the development and replication of successful work-integrated learning programs throughout the state.
(2) Local applicant schools receiving funding through participation in the initiative must:
(a) Provide academic curricula in a work-integrated and career-contextualized manner and include an external mentor for each student in the program;
(b) Demonstrate collaboration with and input from students, parents or guardians, local employers, community members, a workforce development council, and a labor organization. Evidence of local collaborations may include but are not limited to partnerships with a dropout reengagement organization, an apprenticeship sponsor, a community and technical college, a STEM network, or a homeless youth service organization;
(c) Reflect local circumstances, including local industries, employers, and labor markets;
(d) Comply with graduation requirements established by the state board of education; and
(e) Align the high school and beyond plans of participating students to reflect opportunities that may be available through the initiative.
(3)(a) Local applicant schools selected to participate in the work-integrated learning initiative must, in accordance with this section and RCW 28A.300.196, submit to the work-integrated learning advisory committee created in RCW 28A.300.196 an interim and an end-of-project report that includes numeric and other data summarizing the effects of their work-integrated learning project programs on high school graduation rates, state test scores, and community partnerships, including partnerships with local employers and industries.
(b) In complying with this subsection (3), local applicant schools must also provide other data and information as requested by the work-integrated learning advisory committee in accordance with RCW 28A.300.196.
(4) For the purposes of this section and RCW 28A.300.195 and 28A.300.196, "work-integrated learning" includes but is not limited to early, frequent, and systematic learning experiences that are essential for preparing Washington youth for high-demand, family-wage jobs in Washington state, and that engage students in grades five through twelve or through high school dropout reengagement plans.



Regional educator recruitment program. (Expires July 1, 2022.)

(1)(a) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction must administer the regional educator recruitment program. Grant awards of up to one hundred thousand dollars each must be awarded to the three educational service districts whose school districts have the least access to alternative route teacher certification programs under chapter 28A.660 RCW.
(b) Beginning September 1, 2019, the educational service districts in the program must employ a person with the duties and characteristics specified in RCW 28A.310.235. The educational service districts in the program must collaborate with the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the Washington association of educational service districts to prepare the report required in (c) of this subsection.
(c) By December 1, 2021, and in compliance with RCW 43.01.036, the office of the superintendent of public instruction, in collaboration with the Washington association of educational service districts, must evaluate the program and submit a report to the appropriate committees of the legislature. At a minimum, the report must: Summarize the activities of the educational service districts in the program with regard to educator recruitment, including the activities described in RCW 28A.310.235, in comparison to the educator recruitment activities of the educational service districts not participating in the program; include any relevant outcome data that is available; and recommend whether the program should be modified, expanded to all educational service districts, or discontinued.
(2) This section expires July 1, 2022.

NOTES:

Effective dateFindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28A.310.235.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28B.10.033.
Intent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28B.102.030.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.415.265.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.410.287.



Educational service district alternative route pilot program. (Expires August 1, 2025.)

(1)(a) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the Washington professional educator standards board shall distribute grants to an educational service district that volunteers to pilot an alternative route teacher certification program, under chapter 28A.660 RCW. The purpose of the grant is to provide financial assistance to teacher candidates enrolled in the educational service district's alternative route teacher certification program with the intent to pursue an initial teacher certificate. The Washington professional educator standards board must provide a grant sufficient to provide up to five thousand dollars of financial assistance for up to twenty teacher candidates in the 2019-20 school year and for up to thirty teacher candidates in the 2020-21 school year.
(b) In piloting the program, the educational service district must:
(i) Engage retired or practicing teachers and administrators who are knowledgeable and experienced classroom teachers to inform the development and curriculum of the program;
(ii) Provide extended support and mentoring through the first three years of a teacher's career, using the components of the beginning educator support team, under RCW 28A.415.265;
(iii) Support school districts in developing school staff and community members to become teachers, so that the district's teachers better reflect the region's demographics, values, and interests; and
(iv) Provide opportunities for classified staff to become teachers.
(2) By November 1, 2024, the volunteer educational service district must report to the Washington professional educator standards board with the outcomes of the pilot and any recommendations for implementing alternative route teacher certification programs in other educational service districts. The report must include the following data: (a) The number of teacher candidates applying for, and completing, the alternative route teacher certification program; (b) the number of program completers who are hired as teachers, both in the educational service district and elsewhere in the state; and (c) the retention of teachers in the educational service district before and after implementation of the pilot. The data must be disaggregated by race and ethnicity, gender, type of endorsement, and school. The report must also include feedback from school principals and teachers in the local school districts on the quality of the teacher candidates they worked with during the pilot.
(3) By December 1, 2024, and in compliance with RCW 43.01.036, the Washington professional educator standards board must submit the educational service district's report, required under subsection (2) of this section, to the appropriate committees of the legislature, with recommendations for whether the pilot program should be expanded, modified, or terminated.
(4) This section expires August 1, 2025.

NOTES:

Effective dateFindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28A.310.235.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28B.10.033.
Intent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28B.102.030.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.415.265.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.410.287.



Teacher preparation programsReport.

By December 1, 2019, and in compliance with RCW 43.01.036, the student achievement council, in cooperation with the Washington professional educator standards board-approved teacher preparation programs, the Washington state school directors' association, and the rural education center at Washington State University, must submit a report to the appropriate committees of the legislature. The report must include policy recommendations to encourage or require the Washington professional educator standards board-approved teacher preparation programs to develop relationships with, and provide supervisory support for field placements of student teachers in, school districts that are not in the general geographic area of an approved teacher preparation program.

NOTES:

Effective dateFindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28A.310.235.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See notes following RCW 28B.10.033.
Intent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28B.102.030.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.415.265.
FindingsIntent2019 c 295: See note following RCW 28A.410.287.



Paraeducator associate of arts degree.

(1) The professional educator standards board and the state board for community and technical colleges, in consultation with the superintendent of public instruction, the state apprenticeship training council, and community colleges, shall adopt rules as necessary under chapter 34.05 RCW to implement the paraeducator associate of arts degree.
(2) As used in this section, a "paraeducator" is an individual who has completed an associate of arts degree for a paraeducator. The paraeducator may be hired by a school district to assist certificated instructional staff in the direct instruction of children in small and large groups, individualized instruction, testing of children, recordkeeping, and preparation of materials. The paraeducator shall work under the direction of instructional certificated staff.
(3)(a) The training program for a paraeducator associate of arts degree shall include, but is not limited to, the general requirements for receipt of an associate of arts degree and training in the areas of introduction to childhood education, orientation to children with disabilities, fundamentals of childhood education, creative activities for children, instructional materials for children, fine art experiences for children, the psychology of learning, introduction to education, child health and safety, child development and guidance, first aid, and a practicum in a school setting.
(b) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, by September 1, 2018, the training program for a paraeducator associate of arts degree must incorporate the state paraeducator standards of practice adopted by the paraeducator board under RCW 28A.413.050.
(4) Consideration shall be given to transferability of credit earned in this program to teacher preparation programs at colleges and universities.

NOTES:

Effective date2011 1st sp.s. c 11 §§ 101-103, 106-202, 204-244, and 301: See note following RCW 28B.76.020.
Intent2011 1st sp.s. c 11: See note following RCW 28B.76.020.
FindingsPurposePart headings not law2006 c 263: See notes following RCW 28A.150.230.
Part headings, table of contents not law1995 c 335: See note following RCW 28A.150.360.



Running start summer school pilot program. (Expires December 31, 2022.)

(1) Subject to the availability of amounts appropriated for this specific purpose, the office of the superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the state board for community and technical colleges, shall establish the running start summer school pilot program as described in this section. The purpose of the pilot program is to evaluate interest in and barriers to expanding the running start program to include the summer term.
(2) The office of the superintendent of public instruction, in consultation with the state board for community and technical colleges, must select up to three community colleges that choose to participate in the pilot program during the 2021 and 2022 summer academic terms. One community college must be located east of the crest of the Cascade mountains and another must be located in a county with a population between one hundred fifteen thousand and one hundred fifty thousand.
(3) Participating community colleges must establish agreements with the school districts of eligible students about data sharing, credit transfer, funds transfer, and other administrative matters.
(4) Under the pilot program, an eligible student may enroll in a participating community college tuition-free. Students who are eligible under subsection (7)(a)(ii) of this section may enroll for a maximum of five college credits per summer academic term. Provisions in RCW 28A.600.310 (2) and (3), which describe fees paid by running start students and fee waivers for low-income running start students, apply to eligible students participating in the pilot program.
(5) The school district of an eligible student must transmit to the participating community college an amount per each full-time equivalent college student at statewide uniform rates for vocational and nonvocational students. The superintendent of public instruction shall separately calculate and allocate amounts appropriated for this specific purpose under the omnibus operating appropriations act to school districts for purposes of making such payments and for granting school districts seven percent thereof to offset pilot program related costs. The calculations and allocations must be based upon the estimated statewide annual average per full-time equivalent high school student allocations under RCW 28A.150.260, excluding small high school enhancements, and rules adopted under RCW 28A.600.390. The funds received by the community college from the school district are not tuition or operating fees and may be retained by the community college. A student enrolled under this section must be counted for the purpose of meeting enrollment targets in accordance with terms and conditions specified in the omnibus operating appropriations act.
(6) By November 10, 2022, and in accordance with RCW 43.01.036, the office of the superintendent of public instruction and the state board for community and technical colleges shall jointly report to the appropriate committees of the legislature with findings from and recommendations regarding the pilot program, including recommending whether to expand the running start program to include the summer term.
(7) The definitions in this subsection apply throughout this section unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(a) "Eligible student" means:
(i) A student attending a participating high school who will be eligible to enroll in grade eleven or twelve in the subsequent school year; or
(ii) A student who graduated from a participating high school in the current school year and who has five or fewer college credits to earn before meeting associate degree requirements.
(b) "Participating community college" means a community college selected, as described in subsection (2) of this section, to participate in the pilot program.
(c) "Participating high school" means a high school in a school district that has an agreement, as described under subsection (3) of this section, with a participating community college.
(d) "Pilot program" means the running start summer pilot program established in this section.
(e) "Running start program" has the same meaning as in RCW 28A.600.300.
(8)(a) Except as provided in (b) of this subsection, and unless the context clearly requires otherwise, the requirements established in RCW 28A.600.300 through 28A.600.400 apply to the running start summer school pilot program.
(b) The provisions of RCW 28A.600.310(4) relating to calculation, allocation, and distribution of funds and RCW 28A.600.385 relating to cooperative agreements with community colleges in Oregon and Idaho do not apply to this section.
(9) This section expires December 31, 2022.

NOTES:

FindingsIntent2020 c 348: "(1) The legislature finds that the successes of the running start program, a program that allows students to earn high school and college credit through courses taken at participating institutions of higher education, have enabled students throughout the state to meaningfully advance their secondary and postsecondary education goals. However, because running start program schedules are constrained by the academic calendar of the applicable high school, students are precluded from participating in running start programs during the summer academic term.
(2) The legislature finds that creating a summer term running start pilot program for students who have completed grade ten or eleven would result in numerous benefits, including providing students with additional opportunities to: Complete requirements for earning a high school diploma or an associate's degree; and explore college-level courses in a lower stress environment that does not include concurrent high school obligations. The expansion of these opportunities could be especially beneficial for students who:
(a) Need or want additional academic credit for high school requirements;
(b) Are interested in maximizing opportunities to earn college credit before or immediately after graduating from high school;
(c) Have not determined which career and educational pathways to pursue after high school and wish to explore academic options; and
(d) May be the first in their family to attend an institution of higher education.
(3) The legislature, therefore, intends to establish a two-year running start summer school pilot program to evaluate interest in and barriers to expanding the running start program to include the summer term." [ 2020 c 348 § 1.]



Rules.

The superintendent of public instruction shall adopt rules as necessary under chapter 34.05 RCW to carry out the provisions of chapter 233, Laws of 1989.
[ 1989 c 233 § 17. Formerly RCW 28A.120.800.]