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296-17A-3309  <<  296-17A-3402 >>   296-17A-3403

(Effective until January 1, 2021)

PDFWAC 296-17A-3402

Classification 3402.

3402-00 Pump, safe, scale, auto jack, water meter, air compressor and elevator: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or assemble pumps, safes, scales, auto jacks, water meters, air compressors, and elevators and associated electronic components.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Welding;
• Machining;
• General mechanical and electrical work;
• Assembly work.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools;
• Lathes;
• Mills;
• Drills;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Welders;
• Punches;
• Shears;
• Compression equipment;
• Pressure testers.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Brass screws and rubber washers;
• Metals of all types, gauges, sizes, shapes and dimensions.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses installing or repairing safes must be reported separately in classification 0607;
• Worker hours or businesses engaged in installing, servicing or repairing elevators must be reported separately in classification 0602;
• Worker hours or businesses installing pumps must be reported in the applicable classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-05 Machine shops, N.O.C., job shops, tool sharpening, mobile welding shops, storage battery manufacturing, assembly or repair, multimedia blasting, die casting, and heat treating metal
Applies to:
Businesses with general machine shop operations not covered by another class. This classification also applies to the manufacture, assembly or repair of storage batteries, tool sharpening, multimedia blasting, die-casting and heat-treating.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Tool sharpening;
• Welding;
• Mobile welding shops;
• Machining;
• Multimedia blasting:
- Multimedia (such as, but not limited to, glass, plastic and sand) blasting operations which strip paint or other coatings from metal or fiberglass. Most of the blasting operations in this classification are done on automobiles, but it also applies to establishments that perform blasting on items such as, but not limited to, barbecue grills, and cast iron pieces. Multimedia blasting processes in this classification are performed in a shop, use less air pressure and media with softer finishes than other blasting operations.
• Die casting:
- Die-casting is a manufacturing process for producing accurately dimensioned, sharply defined metal products, which are referred to as "die castings." "Dies" are the steel molds used to mass-produce the product. The process begins when ingots of various metal alloys are melted in die casting machines. The machine forces the metal into the die under hydraulic or pneumatic pressure. The casting quickly solidifies in the die, and is automatically ejected by the machine, and the cycle starts again. The castings are cleaned by grinding or sanding, which also removes any excess metal "flash." Many die casting manufacturers maintain their own machine shop for making the dies. Die making, when done as a part of die casting operations, is included within the scope of this classification.
• Heat treating:
- Process may use computer numeric controlled (CNC) ovens or furnaces. The oven may heat up to 1200 degrees Fahrenheit and a furnace may heat up to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. The metal(s) is placed on a platform; the platform is hydraulically moved into the first chamber and the door is automatically closed. At this time, the oxygen is burned from the chamber. Then the second chamber door is opened and the metal enters the oven/furnace. Depending upon the specifications, the heat treating process usually takes six to sixteen hours. When the metal is finished in the heating chamber, it returns automatically to the first chamber. Then the platform lowers and the metals are dipped into a cooling agent. Once the metals are cooled to room temperature the platform rises, the door opens, and the materials are removed. The process is essentially the same without using computer numeric controlled (CNC) heat-treating equipment except that, rather than being hydraulically operated, the machine operators move the metals through the system. Many establishments do not produce a product, but heat-treat a variety of products to customer specifications.
• Storage battery, manufacture, assembly or repair:
- Lead ingots, weighing 20-25 pounds, are melted and poured into a mold or casting machine. After the grids are cooled lead oxide is then pumped onto each side of a grid and cured by baking in an oven of about 300-400 degrees F. The plates are then assembled by placing a negative separator (zinc) between a positive separator (copper), and so forth until there are enough of these cells to form the battery. Next, they are sent to a burning machine that cures the paste and plates. After the burning process, the plates are placed into a plastic or hard rubber box-like container and cured for two or three days. The plates are welded together and the top is attached to the body of the battery case with an epoxy glue. Diluted sulfuric acid is added to the battery and then it is put on a charger. The battery is then cleaned and packed for shipping.
Special note: The term "job shop" is an industry term that means the shop will produce products to customer specifications.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Welding equipment;
• Inspection equipment;
• Material handling equipment;
• Casting machines;
• Burning machines;
• Ovens or furnaces;
• Steel molds;
• Hand tools;
• Air tools;
• Compressors;
• Portable welding equipment;
• Mobile welding equipment.
- Are used exclusively to repair machinery or equipment. A "mobile shop" in this classification usually means a van or pickup pulling a utility trailer equipped with hand tools, specialty tools, air tools, a compressor, and a portable welding unit. The machinery or equipment is usually repaired at the customer's location; however, sometimes the broken part is removed and taken back to the shop for repair.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Metals of all types, gauges, sizes, shapes and dimensions;
• Plastics.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses sandblasting buildings or structures must be reported separately in classification 0504;
• Worker hours or businesses repairing buildings and structures must be reported separately in the appropriate construction classification;
• Worker hours or businesses doing mechanical repair (such as, on engines or electrical systems) must be reported separately in the classification applicable to the work being performed;
• Manufacturing dies for others, is classified in 3402-74;
• Manufacturing dry cell (flashlight type) batteries, is classified in 3602;
• Battery sales and installation, are classified in the applicable automotive services classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification, with the exception of mobile welding operations.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-06 Power saw, lawn and garden equipment, small motor, N.O.C: Repair
Applies to:
Businesses that repair small power tools, small motors powered by gas or diesel, outboard marine engines, and lawn and garden equipment not covered by another classification (N.O.C.).
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand and air tools.
Classification 3402-06 is assigned in conjunction with a store classification for establishments that have a store operation and repair the type of items they sell. Classification 3402-06 may also be assigned to a manufacturer representative who performs warranty repairs.
This is a shop or plant only classification; it includes work being performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses repairing electrical motors are classified in 5201;
• Activities away from the shop or plant which must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-14 Furnace, heater, radiator, wood, propane, or pellet stoves: Manufacturing
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture furnaces, radiators, wood, propane, or pellet burning stoves or similar heating fixtures.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools;
• Solder guns;
• Punches;
• Lathes;
• Saws.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Sheet metal;
• Plate metal;
• Aluminum;
• Stainless steel.
Note: Establishments in this classification may have separate areas for electronic assembly and/or painting.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing radiators for automobiles or trucks, is classified in 3402-48;
• Manufacturing baseboard heaters, is classified in 3404;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-26 Saw blade and abrasive wheel: Manufacturing, assembly or sharpening
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture abrasive wheels, and businesses that manufacture, assemble, or sharpen saw blades such as, but not limited to, those used in circular saws, band saws, ripsaws, keyhole saws, and handsaws such as hacksaws or meat saws.
Abrasive wheel manufacturing operations often include a laboratory where carbon and other materials are mixed together to form the abrasive edges of the wheels.
Note: Businesses in this classification may also perform incidental sharpening services for items such as, but not limited to, tools, scissors, and knives.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Saws;
• Mills;
• Drills;
• Hand tools.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• High tensile steel;
• Carbide tipped blades.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Repair or sharpening of chain saws, is classified in 3402-06;
• Manufacture or repair of electrical saws, is classified in 5201;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-29 Nut, bolt, screw, nail, tack, rivet, eyelet spike, needle, bedspring, wire mattress, N.O.C.: Manufacturing; sprinkler head, speedometer, carburetor: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture nuts, bolts, screws, nails, tacks, rivets, eyelets, spikes, needles, bedspring, and wire mattresses not covered by another classification. N.O.C. This classification also applies to businesses that manufacture or assemble sprinkler heads, speedometers, or carburetors. Rebuilding carburetors is also included in this classification.
The carburetor rebuilding may be performed on vehicles that are driven or towed into the shop, or on carburetors that have been already removed from the vehicles.
Businesses in this classification may have separate areas for deburring, inspecting, packing and shipping.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Saws;
• Shears;
• Presses;
• Chuckers;
• Threading and tapping machines;
• Hand tools;
• Air tools;
• Diagnostic scopes;
• Drill press;
• Coiling machines;
• Ovens.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel rods;
• Iron rods;
• Small component parts;
• Wire.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing stuffed mattresses, is classified in 3708;
• Manufacturing handles, latches, and hinges, is classified in 3404;
• Repair of speedometers or carburetors in a vehicle, is classified in the appropriate vehicle repair classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-40 Welding or cutting, N.O.C. (mobile operations limited to repair of equipment and machinery)
Applies to:
Businesses doing welding or metal cutting not covered by another classification (N.O.C.) either in the shop or at the customer's site.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Welding equipment;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Drills;
• Material handling equipment.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel;
• Aluminum alloys.
This classification also includes "mobile shops" which are used exclusively to repair machinery or equipment. A "mobile shop" in this classification usually means a van or pickup pulling a utility trailer equipped with hand tools, specialty tools, air tools, a compressor, and a portable welding unit. The machinery or equipment is usually repaired at the customer's location, sometimes with the use of the customer's equipment; however, broken parts may be removed and taken back to the shop for repair.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses doing welding construction or repairs to buildings or structures must be reported separately in the classification applicable to the work being performed;
• Worker hours or businesses doing mechanical repairs (such as, on engines and electrical systems) must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-48 Automobile or truck, radiator and heater core: Manufacturing and repair shops
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture and/or repair automobile or truck radiator and heater cores.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Repair of radiators in the vehicle, or removed from vehicle;
• Radiators cleaned, air pressured, and dipped in water tank to check for leaks;
• Leaks repaired by welding the holes shut;
• Radiators dipped again to ensure the repair has been made properly;
• Cleaning radiator by sandblasting, ultra sound baths or "rodding" the radiator to remove corrosion.
Note: Manufacturer in this classification may have a die casting area and a separate electronic assembly area.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools and air tools;
• Solder guns;
• Punches;
• Welders;
• Dipping tanks;
• Hoists;
• Forklifts.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-74 Tool: Manufacturing, not hot forming or stamping; machine finishing tools, die: Manufacturing ferrous
Applies to:
Businesses doing tool manufacturing or die manufacturing, for others, from ferrous materials.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Jigs;
• Fixtures and dies for metal work;
• Wrenches;
• Screw drivers;
• Hammers;
• Torque wrenches;
• Pliers;
• Sockets;
• Cutting tools used in lathes, mills, rotors and saws.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Air and hand tools;
• Polishers;
• Sharpeners;
• Grinders;
• Inspection equipment;
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Shapers;
• Sharpeners;
• Drill presses.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Businesses may have a galvanizing and/or electroplating area for the finish work, which is included when performed by employees of employers subject to this classification.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Tool forging by hot forming or stamping is classified in 5106;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-77 Auto, truck, semi-trailer and bus body: Manufacturing; travel trailer body: Manufacturing or repair; automobile or motorcycle: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture auto, truck, and bus bodies, or that manufacture or repair travel trailer bodies or cargo containers, or that manufacture or assemble automobiles or motorcycles.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Welding operations;
• Using cutting torches;
• Operating milling, cutting and turning machines;
• Assembly operations performed with air and hand tools;
• Repair or replace hydraulic units;
• Shops may have a finish sanding area as well as a paint area where the vehicle bodies are sprayed with primer, a body bonding material, or a finish coat of paint.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Welders;
• Cutting torches;
• Air or hand tools;
• CNC machinery (computer numeric controlled);
• Saws;
• Grinders;
• Drill presses;
• Shears;
• Breaks;
• Hydraulic presses;
• Iron workers;
• Grinders;
• Hoists;
• Cranes and forklifts.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel or aluminum, varying in thickness, 16 gauge to plate metal up to one inch thick;
• Shapes include sheet metal, tubes, solid rod or I-beams.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-85 Auto or truck parts; machining or rebuild not in vehicle
Applies to:
Businesses that machine or rebuild auto or truck parts that are not in the vehicle.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Water pumps;
• Fuel pumps;
• Transmissions;
• Heads;
• Brake drums;
• Ball joints;
• Rear ends;
• Sockets;
• Pulleys;
• Shafts;
• Fittings;
• Flywheels;
• Bearings.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Grinders;
• Sanders;
• Presses;
• Welders;
• Balancing equipment.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
This is a shop or plant only classification; it includes work being performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing or rebuilding auto, truck, or aircraft engines are classified in 3402-86;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-86 Auto, truck, or aircraft engine, N.O.C.: Manufacturing or rebuilding
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or rebuild auto, truck, or aircraft engines not covered by another classification (N.O.C.), including manufacturing the component parts.
Note: The basic difference between automobile, truck, and aircraft engines is the size and weight of the parts worked on.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Use specialized machines and air tools to tear the core down to an engine block;
• Rebuild the engine;
• After engine is stripped down to the engine block, it is placed in a machine called a baker which heats to approximately 600 degrees and bakes away the grease;
• After baking, the engine block is placed in a sand blaster where the surface is cleaned with very fine steel shot;
• Engine block is then placed in a large pressure washer which removes the steel shot;
• Crank and shafts are ground and turned on machinery similar to lathes;
• Heads and valves are machined on valve grinders, valve facers, and head grinders. Shops that do not have equipment to grind the crank and camshafts will contract work out to other shops, or buy new crank and camshafts.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Baker machines;
• Sand blasters;
• Pressure washers;
• Lathes;
• Valve grinders;
• Valve facers;
• Head grinders;
• Boring bars;
• Hones;
• Solvent tanks;
• Hoists;
• Forklifts.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Machining or rebuilding auto or truck parts is classified in 3402-85;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-94 Precision machined parts, N.O.C.: Manufacturing, gear: Manufacturing or grinding, small arms and ammunition: Manufacturing, assembly or rebuild, valve: Manufacturing
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture precision-machined parts not covered by another classification (N.O.C); that manufacture or grind gears, that manufacture, assemble or rebuild small arms (.50 caliber or less), that manufacture or reload ammunition, or that manufacture valves.
Note: Most precision machine establishments are "job shops." Job shops make component parts for other businesses according to customer specifications, rather than manufacturing a specific product.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Machining;
• Grinding gears;
• Metal stamping of casings;
• Assembly;
• Inspecting;
• Cutting key slots and broaches.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Precision parts for aerospace/medical industry;
• Gears;
• Pistols;
• Rifles;
• Shotguns;
• Light machine guns;
• Valves (regulate the flow of air, gas, liquids, or loose material through structures by opening, closing or obstructing passageways. They operate manually, electronically, with compressed air, or hydraulic pressure);
• Other types of precision parts.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Manual and CNC (computer numeric controlled) mills and lathes;
• Water jet machines;
• Saws;
• Drill press/drills;
• Grinding machines;
• Gear shapers;
• Hobbers;
• Other types of CNC machinery.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel;
• Stainless steel;
• Aluminum;
• Titanium;
• Inconel;
• Plastics;
• Shapes include; solid blocks, flat bar, tube, angle stock.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing or repairing of heavy arms is classified in 5109;
• Gun stores are classified in 6309;
• Manufacturing valves made in a die mold is classified in 3402-74;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-98 Machinery, N.O.C.: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or assemble machinery not covered by another classification (N.O.C.).
Finished products vary widely and range from hand held machines to those weighing thousands of pounds. For the purpose of this classification, machinery means any combination of mechanical parts constructed primarily with metal and associated electronic components.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Cutting;
• Welding;
• Forming;
• Drilling;
• Riveting;
• Clamping and bolting;
• Machining.
Note: Manufacturers in this classification may have a separate electronic assembly area.
Machinery manufactured or assembled include, but are not limited to:
• Grinding machines;
• Boring machines;
• Conveyor systems;
• Wood chippers;
• Printing or bookbinding machinery;
• Confectioners or food processing machinery;
• Photo processing machinery (photo processors or film enlargers);
• Shoe or textile machinery;
• Office machinery (copiers, collators, mail/postage machines, calculators and automated letter openers);
• Cash registers;
• Sewing machines.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Lathes;
• Mills;
• Breaks;
• Shears;
• Welders;
• Presses;
• Binding machinery;
• Drills;
• Saws;
• Water jets;
• Hand and air tools.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Metal in varied sizes, shapes and dimensions;
• Plastic;
• Wood.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses setting-up, installing or repairing printing, bookbinding, confectioners, or food processing machines must be reported separately in 0603;
• Worker hours or businesses installing or repairing shoe or textile machinery must be reported separately in 0603;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020 and 51.16.035. WSR 19-17-069, § 296-17A-3402, filed 8/20/19, effective 10/1/19; WSR 13-11-128, § 296-17A-3402, filed 5/21/13, effective 7/1/13. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, 51.04.020(1). WSR 10-24-118, § 296-17A-3402, filed 12/1/10, effective 1/1/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, 2008 c 70, and Title 51 RCW. WSR 08-15-132, § 296-17A-3402, filed 7/22/08, effective 10/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035 and 51.16.100. WSR 07-12-047, § 296-17A-3402, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07. WSR 07-01-014, recodified as § 296-17A-3402, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035 and 51.16.100. WSR 06-24-055, § 296-17-580, filed 12/1/06, effective 1/1/07; WSR 06-12-075, § 296-17-580, filed 6/6/06, effective 1/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 99-18-068, § 296-17-580, filed 8/31/99, effective 10/1/99; WSR 98-18-042, § 296-17-580, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98; WSR 96-12-039, § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/96, effective 7/1/96. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020(1) and 51.16.035. WSR 93-12-093, § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/93, effective 7/1/93; WSR 89-24-051 (Order 89-22), § 296-17-580, filed 12/1/89, effective 1/1/90. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 88-12-050 (Order 88-06), § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/88, effective 7/1/88; WSR 85-24-032 (Order 85-33), § 296-17-580, filed 11/27/85, effective 1/1/86; WSR 85-06-026 (Order 85-7), § 296-17-580, filed 2/28/85, effective 4/1/85; WSR 83-24-017 (Order 83-36), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/83, effective 1/1/84; WSR 82-24-047 (Order 82-38), § 296-17-580, filed 11/29/82, effective 1/1/83; WSR 81-24-042 (Order 81-30), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/81, effective 1/1/82. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.030 and 51.16.035. WSR 79-12-086 (Order 79-18), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/79, effective 1/1/80; Order 76-36, § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/76; Order 75-38, § 296-17-580, filed 11/24/75, effective 1/1/76; Order 73-22, § 296-17-580, filed 11/9/73, effective 1/1/74.]
(Effective January 1, 2021)

PDFWAC 296-17A-3402

Classification 3402.

3402-02 Pump, safe, scale, auto jack, water meter, air compressor and elevator: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or assemble pumps, safes, scales, auto jacks, water meters, air compressors, and elevators and associated electronic components.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Welding;
• Machining;
• General mechanical and electrical work;
• Assembly work.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools;
• Lathes;
• Mills;
• Drills;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Welders;
• Punches;
• Shears;
• Compression equipment;
• Pressure testers.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Brass screws and rubber washers;
• Metals of all types, gauges, sizes, shapes and dimensions.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses installing or repairing safes must be reported separately in classification 0607;
• Worker hours or businesses engaged in installing, servicing or repairing elevators must be reported separately in classification 0602;
• Worker hours or businesses installing pumps must be reported in the applicable classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-05 Machine shops, N.O.C., job shops, tool sharpening, mobile welding shops, storage battery manufacturing, assembly or repair, multimedia blasting, die casting, and heat treating metal
Applies to:
Businesses with general machine shop operations not covered by another class. This classification also applies to the manufacture, assembly or repair of storage batteries, tool sharpening, multimedia blasting, die-casting and heat-treating.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Tool sharpening;
• Welding;
• Mobile welding shops;
• Machining;
• Multimedia blasting:
- Multimedia (such as, but not limited to, glass, plastic and sand) blasting operations which strip paint or other coatings from metal or fiberglass. Most of the blasting operations in this classification are done on automobiles, but it also applies to establishments that perform blasting on items such as, but not limited to, barbecue grills, and cast iron pieces. Multimedia blasting processes in this classification are performed in a shop, use less air pressure and media with softer finishes than other blasting operations.
• Die casting:
- Die-casting is a manufacturing process for producing accurately dimensioned, sharply defined metal products, which are referred to as "die castings." "Dies" are the steel molds used to mass-produce the product. The process begins when ingots of various metal alloys are melted in die casting machines. The machine forces the metal into the die under hydraulic or pneumatic pressure. The casting quickly solidifies in the die, and is automatically ejected by the machine, and the cycle starts again. The castings are cleaned by grinding or sanding, which also removes any excess metal "flash." Many die casting manufacturers maintain their own machine shop for making the dies. Die making, when done as a part of die casting operations, is included within the scope of this classification.
• Heat treating:
- Process may use computer numeric controlled (CNC) ovens or furnaces. The oven may heat up to 1200 degrees Fahrenheit and a furnace may heat up to 2000 degrees Fahrenheit. The metal(s) is placed on a platform; the platform is hydraulically moved into the first chamber and the door is automatically closed. At this time, the oxygen is burned from the chamber. Then the second chamber door is opened and the metal enters the oven/furnace. Depending upon the specifications, the heat treating process usually takes six to sixteen hours. When the metal is finished in the heating chamber, it returns automatically to the first chamber. Then the platform lowers and the metals are dipped into a cooling agent. Once the metals are cooled to room temperature the platform rises, the door opens, and the materials are removed. The process is essentially the same without using computer numeric controlled (CNC) heat-treating equipment except that, rather than being hydraulically operated, the machine operators move the metals through the system. Many establishments do not produce a product, but heat-treat a variety of products to customer specifications.
• Storage battery, manufacture, assembly or repair:
- Lead ingots, weighing 20-25 pounds, are melted and poured into a mold or casting machine. After the grids are cooled lead oxide is then pumped onto each side of a grid and cured by baking in an oven of about 300-400 degrees F. The plates are then assembled by placing a negative separator (zinc) between a positive separator (copper), and so forth until there are enough of these cells to form the battery. Next, they are sent to a burning machine that cures the paste and plates. After the burning process, the plates are placed into a plastic or hard rubber box-like container and cured for two or three days. The plates are welded together and the top is attached to the body of the battery case with an epoxy glue. Diluted sulfuric acid is added to the battery and then it is put on a charger. The battery is then cleaned and packed for shipping.
Special note: The term "job shop" is an industry term that means the shop will produce products to customer specifications.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Welding equipment;
• Inspection equipment;
• Material handling equipment;
• Casting machines;
• Burning machines;
• Ovens or furnaces;
• Steel molds;
• Hand tools;
• Air tools;
• Compressors;
• Portable welding equipment;
• Mobile welding equipment.
- Are used exclusively to repair machinery or equipment. A "mobile shop" in this classification usually means a van or pickup pulling a utility trailer equipped with hand tools, specialty tools, air tools, a compressor, and a portable welding unit. The machinery or equipment is usually repaired at the customer's location; however, sometimes the broken part is removed and taken back to the shop for repair.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Metals of all types, gauges, sizes, shapes and dimensions;
• Plastics.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses sandblasting buildings or structures must be reported separately in classification 0504;
• Worker hours or businesses repairing buildings and structures must be reported separately in the appropriate construction classification;
• Worker hours or businesses doing mechanical repair (such as, on engines or electrical systems) must be reported separately in the classification applicable to the work being performed;
• Manufacturing dies for others, is classified in 3402-74;
• Manufacturing dry cell (flashlight type) batteries, is classified in 3602;
• Battery sales and installation, are classified in the applicable automotive services classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification, with the exception of mobile welding operations.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-06 Power saw, lawn and garden equipment, small motor, N.O.C: Repair
Applies to:
Businesses that repair small power tools, small motors powered by gas or diesel, outboard marine engines, and lawn and garden equipment not covered by another classification (N.O.C.).
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand and air tools.
Classification 3402-06 is assigned in conjunction with a store classification for establishments that have a store operation and repair the type of items they sell. Classification 3402-06 may also be assigned to a manufacturer representative who performs warranty repairs.
This is a shop or plant only classification; it includes work being performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses repairing electrical motors are classified in 5201;
• Activities away from the shop or plant which must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-14 Furnace, heater, radiator, wood, propane, or pellet stoves: Manufacturing
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture furnaces, radiators, wood, propane, or pellet burning stoves or similar heating fixtures.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools;
• Solder guns;
• Punches;
• Lathes;
• Saws.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Sheet metal;
• Plate metal;
• Aluminum;
• Stainless steel.
Note: Establishments in this classification may have separate areas for electronic assembly and/or painting.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing radiators for automobiles or trucks, is classified in 3402-48;
• Manufacturing baseboard heaters, is classified in 3404;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-26 Saw blade and abrasive wheel: Manufacturing, assembly or sharpening
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture abrasive wheels, and businesses that manufacture, assemble, or sharpen saw blades such as, but not limited to, those used in circular saws, band saws, ripsaws, keyhole saws, and handsaws such as hacksaws or meat saws.
Abrasive wheel manufacturing operations often include a laboratory where carbon and other materials are mixed together to form the abrasive edges of the wheels.
Note: Businesses in this classification may also perform incidental sharpening services for items such as, but not limited to, tools, scissors, and knives.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Saws;
• Mills;
• Drills;
• Hand tools.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• High tensile steel;
• Carbide tipped blades.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Repair or sharpening of chain saws, is classified in 3402-06;
• Manufacture or repair of electrical saws, is classified in 5201;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-29 Nut, bolt, screw, nail, tack, rivet, eyelet spike, needle, bedspring, wire mattress, N.O.C.: Manufacturing; sprinkler head, speedometer, carburetor: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture nuts, bolts, screws, nails, tacks, rivets, eyelets, spikes, needles, bedspring, and wire mattresses not covered by another classification. N.O.C. This classification also applies to businesses that manufacture or assemble sprinkler heads, speedometers, or carburetors. Rebuilding carburetors is also included in this classification.
The carburetor rebuilding may be performed on vehicles that are driven or towed into the shop, or on carburetors that have been already removed from the vehicles.
Businesses in this classification may have separate areas for deburring, inspecting, packing and shipping.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Saws;
• Shears;
• Presses;
• Chuckers;
• Threading and tapping machines;
• Hand tools;
• Air tools;
• Diagnostic scopes;
• Drill press;
• Coiling machines;
• Ovens.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel rods;
• Iron rods;
• Small component parts;
• Wire.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing stuffed mattresses, is classified in 3708;
• Manufacturing handles, latches, and hinges, is classified in 3404;
• Repair of speedometers or carburetors in a vehicle, is classified in the appropriate vehicle repair classification;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-40 Welding or cutting, N.O.C. (mobile operations limited to repair of equipment and machinery)
Applies to:
Businesses doing welding or metal cutting not covered by another classification (N.O.C.) either in the shop or at the customer's site.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Welding equipment;
• Grinders;
• Saws;
• Drills;
• Material handling equipment.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel;
• Aluminum alloys.
This classification also includes "mobile shops" which are used exclusively to repair machinery or equipment. A "mobile shop" in this classification usually means a van or pickup pulling a utility trailer equipped with hand tools, specialty tools, air tools, a compressor, and a portable welding unit. The machinery or equipment is usually repaired at the customer's location, sometimes with the use of the customer's equipment; however, broken parts may be removed and taken back to the shop for repair.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses doing welding construction or repairs to buildings or structures must be reported separately in the classification applicable to the work being performed;
• Worker hours or businesses doing mechanical repairs (such as, on engines and electrical systems) must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-48 Automobile or truck, radiator and heater core: Manufacturing and repair shops
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture and/or repair automobile or truck radiator and heater cores.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Repair of radiators in the vehicle, or removed from vehicle;
• Radiators cleaned, air pressured, and dipped in water tank to check for leaks;
• Leaks repaired by welding the holes shut;
• Radiators dipped again to ensure the repair has been made properly;
• Cleaning radiator by sandblasting, ultra sound baths or "rodding" the radiator to remove corrosion.
Note: Manufacturer in this classification may have a die casting area and a separate electronic assembly area.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Hand tools and air tools;
• Solder guns;
• Punches;
• Welders;
• Dipping tanks;
• Hoists;
• Forklifts.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-74 Tool: Manufacturing, not hot forming or stamping; machine finishing tools, die: Manufacturing ferrous
Applies to:
Businesses doing tool manufacturing or die manufacturing, for others, from ferrous materials.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Jigs;
• Fixtures and dies for metal work;
• Wrenches;
• Screw drivers;
• Hammers;
• Torque wrenches;
• Pliers;
• Sockets;
• Cutting tools used in lathes, mills, rotors and saws.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Air and hand tools;
• Polishers;
• Sharpeners;
• Grinders;
• Inspection equipment;
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Shapers;
• Sharpeners;
• Drill presses.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Businesses may have a galvanizing and/or electroplating area for the finish work, which is included when performed by employees of employers subject to this classification.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Tool forging by hot forming or stamping is classified in 5106;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-77 Auto, truck, semi-trailer and bus body: Manufacturing; travel trailer body: Manufacturing or repair; automobile or motorcycle: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture auto, truck, and bus bodies, or that manufacture or repair travel trailer bodies or cargo containers, or that manufacture or assemble automobiles or motorcycles.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Welding operations;
• Using cutting torches;
• Operating milling, cutting and turning machines;
• Assembly operations performed with air and hand tools;
• Repair or replace hydraulic units;
• Shops may have a finish sanding area as well as a paint area where the vehicle bodies are sprayed with primer, a body bonding material, or a finish coat of paint.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Welders;
• Cutting torches;
• Air or hand tools;
• CNC machinery (computer numeric controlled);
• Saws;
• Grinders;
• Drill presses;
• Shears;
• Breaks;
• Hydraulic presses;
• Iron workers;
• Grinders;
• Hoists;
• Cranes and forklifts.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel or aluminum, varying in thickness, 16 gauge to plate metal up to one inch thick;
• Shapes include sheet metal, tubes, solid rod or I-beams.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-85 Auto or truck parts; machining or rebuild not in vehicle
Applies to:
Businesses that machine or rebuild auto or truck parts that are not in the vehicle.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Water pumps;
• Fuel pumps;
• Transmissions;
• Heads;
• Brake drums;
• Ball joints;
• Rear ends;
• Sockets;
• Pulleys;
• Shafts;
• Fittings;
• Flywheels;
• Bearings.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Mills;
• Lathes;
• Grinders;
• Sanders;
• Presses;
• Welders;
• Balancing equipment.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
This is a shop or plant only classification; it includes work being performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing or rebuilding auto, truck, or aircraft engines are classified in 3402-86;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-86 Auto, truck, or aircraft engine, N.O.C.: Manufacturing or rebuilding
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or rebuild auto, truck, or aircraft engines not covered by another classification (N.O.C.), including manufacturing the component parts.
Note: The basic difference between automobile, truck, and aircraft engines is the size and weight of the parts worked on.
Work activities include, but are not limited to:
• Use specialized machines and air tools to tear the core down to an engine block;
• Rebuild the engine;
• After engine is stripped down to the engine block, it is placed in a machine called a baker which heats to approximately 600 degrees and bakes away the grease;
• After baking, the engine block is placed in a sand blaster where the surface is cleaned with very fine steel shot;
• Engine block is then placed in a large pressure washer which removes the steel shot;
• Crank and shafts are ground and turned on machinery similar to lathes;
• Heads and valves are machined on valve grinders, valve facers, and head grinders. Shops that do not have equipment to grind the crank and camshafts will contract work out to other shops, or buy new crank and camshafts.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Baker machines;
• Sand blasters;
• Pressure washers;
• Lathes;
• Valve grinders;
• Valve facers;
• Head grinders;
• Boring bars;
• Hones;
• Solvent tanks;
• Hoists;
• Forklifts.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Machining or rebuilding auto or truck parts is classified in 3402-85;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-94 Precision machined parts, N.O.C.: Manufacturing, gear: Manufacturing or grinding, small arms and ammunition: Manufacturing, assembly or rebuild, valve: Manufacturing
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture precision-machined parts not covered by another classification (N.O.C); that manufacture or grind gears, that manufacture, assemble or rebuild small arms (.50 caliber or less), that manufacture or reload ammunition, or that manufacture valves.
Note: Most precision machine establishments are "job shops." Job shops make component parts for other businesses according to customer specifications, rather than manufacturing a specific product.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Machining;
• Grinding gears;
• Metal stamping of casings;
• Assembly;
• Inspecting;
• Cutting key slots and broaches.
Products manufactured include, but are not limited to:
• Precision parts for aerospace/medical industry;
• Gears;
• Pistols;
• Rifles;
• Shotguns;
• Light machine guns;
• Valves (regulate the flow of air, gas, liquids, or loose material through structures by opening, closing or obstructing passageways. They operate manually, electronically, with compressed air, or hydraulic pressure);
• Other types of precision parts.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Manual and CNC (computer numeric controlled) mills and lathes;
• Water jet machines;
• Saws;
• Drill press/drills;
• Grinding machines;
• Gear shapers;
• Hobbers;
• Other types of CNC machinery.
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Steel;
• Stainless steel;
• Aluminum;
• Titanium;
• Inconel;
• Plastics;
• Shapes include; solid blocks, flat bar, tube, angle stock.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Manufacturing or repairing of heavy arms is classified in 5109;
• Gun stores are classified in 6309;
• Manufacturing valves made in a die mold is classified in 3402-74;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
3402-98 Machinery, N.O.C.: Manufacturing or assembly
Applies to:
Businesses that manufacture or assemble machinery not covered by another classification (N.O.C.).
Finished products vary widely and range from hand held machines to those weighing thousands of pounds. For the purpose of this classification, machinery means any combination of mechanical parts constructed primarily with metal and associated electronic components.
Work activities in this classification include, but are not limited to:
• Cutting;
• Welding;
• Forming;
• Drilling;
• Riveting;
• Clamping and bolting;
• Machining.
Note: Manufacturers in this classification may have a separate electronic assembly area.
Machinery manufactured or assembled include, but are not limited to:
• Grinding machines;
• Boring machines;
• Conveyor systems;
• Wood chippers;
• Printing or bookbinding machinery;
• Confectioners or food processing machinery;
• Photo processing machinery (photo processors or film enlargers);
• Shoe or textile machinery;
• Office machinery (copiers, collators, mail/postage machines, calculators and automated letter openers);
• Cash registers;
• Sewing machines.
Machinery and equipment used include, but are not limited to:
• Lathes;
• Mills;
• Breaks;
• Shears;
• Welders;
• Presses;
• Binding machinery;
• Drills;
• Saws;
• Water jets;
• Hand and air tools.
Note: Machinery/equipment could be manual or computer numeric controlled (CNC).
Materials used include, but are not limited to:
• Metal in varied sizes, shapes and dimensions;
• Plastic;
• Wood.
This classification includes the repair of items being manufactured or assembled when done by employees having operations subject to this classification. This is a shop or plant only classification and includes work performed in an adjacent yard when operated by an employer having operations subject to this classification.
Exclusions:
• Worker hours or businesses setting-up, installing or repairing printing, bookbinding, confectioners, or food processing machines must be reported separately in 0603;
• Worker hours or businesses installing or repairing shoe or textile machinery must be reported separately in 0603;
• Activities away from the shop or plant must be reported separately in the applicable classification.
Note: For rules on assigning and reporting in more than one basic classification, see WAC 296-17-31017 Multiple classifications.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020 and 51.16.035. WSR 20-20-108, § 296-17A-3402, filed 10/6/20, effective 1/1/21; WSR 19-17-069, § 296-17A-3402, filed 8/20/19, effective 10/1/19; WSR 13-11-128, § 296-17A-3402, filed 5/21/13, effective 7/1/13. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, 51.04.020(1). WSR 10-24-118, § 296-17A-3402, filed 12/1/10, effective 1/1/11. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035, 51.16.100, 2008 c 70, and Title 51 RCW. WSR 08-15-132, § 296-17A-3402, filed 7/22/08, effective 10/1/08. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035 and 51.16.100. WSR 07-12-047, § 296-17A-3402, filed 5/31/07, effective 7/1/07. WSR 07-01-014, recodified as § 296-17A-3402, filed 12/8/06, effective 12/8/06. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035 and 51.16.100. WSR 06-24-055, § 296-17-580, filed 12/1/06, effective 1/1/07; WSR 06-12-075, § 296-17-580, filed 6/6/06, effective 1/1/07. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 99-18-068, § 296-17-580, filed 8/31/99, effective 10/1/99; WSR 98-18-042, § 296-17-580, filed 8/28/98, effective 10/1/98; WSR 96-12-039, § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/96, effective 7/1/96. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.020(1) and 51.16.035. WSR 93-12-093, § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/93, effective 7/1/93; WSR 89-24-051 (Order 89-22), § 296-17-580, filed 12/1/89, effective 1/1/90. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.16.035. WSR 88-12-050 (Order 88-06), § 296-17-580, filed 5/31/88, effective 7/1/88; WSR 85-24-032 (Order 85-33), § 296-17-580, filed 11/27/85, effective 1/1/86; WSR 85-06-026 (Order 85-7), § 296-17-580, filed 2/28/85, effective 4/1/85; WSR 83-24-017 (Order 83-36), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/83, effective 1/1/84; WSR 82-24-047 (Order 82-38), § 296-17-580, filed 11/29/82, effective 1/1/83; WSR 81-24-042 (Order 81-30), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/81, effective 1/1/82. Statutory Authority: RCW 51.04.030 and 51.16.035. WSR 79-12-086 (Order 79-18), § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/79, effective 1/1/80; Order 76-36, § 296-17-580, filed 11/30/76; Order 75-38, § 296-17-580, filed 11/24/75, effective 1/1/76; Order 73-22, § 296-17-580, filed 11/9/73, effective 1/1/74.]
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