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Chapter 173-183 WAC

Last Update: 12/14/12

OIL SPILL NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT

WAC Sections

HTMLPDF173-183-010Purpose.
HTMLPDF173-183-020Authority.
HTMLPDF173-183-030Applicability.
HTMLPDF173-183-100Definitions.
THE RDA COMMITTEE AND PREASSESSMENT SCREENING
HTMLPDF173-183-200Preassessment screening process.
HTMLPDF173-183-210Incident discovery and reporting.
HTMLPDF173-183-220Initial site reconnaissance and notification of the RDA committee.
HTMLPDF173-183-230RDA committee.
HTMLPDF173-183-240Preassessment screening.
HTMLPDF173-183-250Damage assessment studies.
HTMLPDF173-183-260Restoration and enhancement projects proposed by the PLP.
HTMLPDF173-183-270Participation.
OIL SPILL COMPENSATION SCHEDULE GENERAL
HTMLPDF173-183-300Purpose.
HTMLPDF173-183-310Authority.
HTMLPDF173-183-320Compensation schedule.
HTMLPDF173-183-330Resource damage assessment using the compensation schedule.
HTMLPDF173-183-340Oil class ranking.
COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR SPILLS INTO MARINE AND ESTUARINE WATERS, EXCLUDING ESTUARINE WATERS OF THE COLUMBIA RIVER
HTMLPDF173-183-400Vulnerability of marine and estuarine environments to oil spills.
HTMLPDF173-183-410Marine and estuarine habitat vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-420Marine bird vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-430Marine fisheries vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-440Shellfish vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-450Salmon vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-460Marine mammal vulnerability.
HTMLPDF173-183-470Marine and estuarine recreation vulnerability.
COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR SPILLS INTO THE COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY
HTMLPDF173-183-500Vulnerability of the Columbia River estuary environment to oil spills.
COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR SPILLS INTO FRESHWATER STREAMS, RIVERS, AND LAKES
HTMLPDF173-183-600Vulnerability of freshwater stream, river, and lake environments to oil spills.
HTMLPDF173-183-610Freshwater vulnerability index.
HTMLPDF173-183-620Habitat index.
COMPENSATION SCHEDULE FOR SPILLS INTO FRESHWATER WETLANDS
HTMLPDF173-183-700Vulnerability of freshwater wetland environments to oil spills.
HTMLPDF173-183-710Wetlands vulnerability classification.
CALCULATION OF DAMAGES USING THE COMPENSATION SCHEDULE
HTMLPDF173-183-800Calculation of damages using the compensation schedule general.
HTMLPDF173-183-810On-scene coordinator responsibilities.
HTMLPDF173-183-820RDA committee chair responsibilities.
HTMLPDF173-183-830Calculation of damages for spills into marine and estuarine waters, except the Columbia River estuary.
HTMLPDF173-183-840Calculation of damages for spills into the Columbia River estuary.
HTMLPDF173-183-850Calculation of damages for spills in freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes.
HTMLPDF173-183-860Calculation of damages for spills into freshwater wetlands.
HTMLPDF173-183-865Calculation of damages for spills entering more than one type of receiving environment.
HTMLPDF173-183-870Reduction of damages based on actions taken by the potential liable party (PLP).
HTMLPDF173-183-880Damage claim.
HTMLPDF173-183-890Substitution of damages.
HTMLPDF173-183-900Annual report.
HTMLPDF173-183-910Severability.
HTMLPDF173-183-920Appendices.


PDF173-183-010

Purpose.

The purpose of this rule is to establish procedures for convening a resource damage assessment (RDA) committee, preassessment screening of resource damages resulting from oil spills to determine which damage assessment methods to use, and determining damages in cases where the compensation schedule is selected as the damage assessment methodology to apply. The RDA committee, utilizing the preassessment screening process, shall determine whether a detailed resource damage assessment studies should be conducted or whether the compensation schedule authorized under RCW 90.48.366 and 90.48.367 will be used to assess damages for each oil spill into state waters.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-010, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-020

Authority.

This regulation implements RCW 90.48.366, 90.48.367, and 90.48.368 of the Water Pollution Control Act, as amended in 1987, 1989, and 1991.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-020, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-030

Applicability.

This chapter shall apply to all oil spills into the waters of the state. Under this chapter, the department may require or take any and all actions necessary to investigate and assess damages from those spills.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-030, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-100

Definitions.

(1) "Columbia River estuary environment" means the habitat and all other public resources associated with or dependent on the estuarine waters of the Columbia River.
(2) "Compensation schedule" means the set of procedures enumerated in WAC 173-183-300 through 173-183-870 to determine the public resource damages resulting from an oil spill for cases in which damages are not quantifiable at a reasonable cost.
(3) "Damages" means the amount of monetary compensation necessary to:
(a) Restore any injured public resource to its condition before sustaining injury as a result of an oil discharge in violation of chapter 90.48 or 90.56 RCW, to the extent technically feasible, including any loss in value incurred during the period between injury and restoration in cases where damages are quantifiable at a reasonable cost; or
(b) Adequately compensate for the loss or diminution in value as determined through application of the compensation schedule provided in WAC 173-183-300 through 173-183-870 in cases where damages are not quantifiable at a reasonable cost.
(4) "Department" means the department of ecology.
(5) "Director" means the director of the department of ecology, or his or her designee.
(6) "Discharge" means any spilling, leaking, pumping, pouring, emitting, emptying, or dumping.
(7) "Estuarine environment" means the habitat and all other public resources associated with or dependent on estuarine waters of the state.
(8) "Estuarine waters" or "estuarine waters of the state" means the waters within state jurisdiction that are semienclosed by land but have open, partly obstructed, or sporadic access to the ocean, and in which seawater is at least occasionally diluted by freshwater runoff from land. Estuarine waters of the state include adjacent tidal flats and beaches up to the limit of tidal inundation or wave splash. For purposes of this chapter, estuarine waters of the state include those designated on the map attached as Appendix 1 to this chapter, and the portion of the Columbia River estuary within state jurisdiction upstream to river mile 46 or the line drawn perpendicularly across the river which touches the upstream end of Puget Island.
(9) "Freshwater stream, river, and lake environment" means the habitat and all other public resources associated with or dependent on the streams, rivers, and lakes under state jurisdiction.
(10) "Freshwater wetland" or "freshwater wetlands" means lands transitional between terrestrial and freshwater aquatic systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow water, and lands having one or more of the following attributes at least periodically: The land supports predominantly hydrophytes; the substrate is predominately undrained hydric soil; and the substrate is nonsoil and saturated with water or covered by shallow water at some time during the growing season each year.
(11) "Freshwater wetland environment" means the habitat and all other public resources associated with or dependent on the freshwater wetlands of the state.
(12) "Freshwaters" or "freshwaters of the state" means all waters of the state except those classified as marine and estuarine waters of the state as defined in this chapter, including lakes, rivers, streams, ponds, other surface waters and wetlands.
(13) "Habitat" means the substrate and complement of associated biota not otherwise included in the vulnerability rankings in the applicable compensation schedule(s) that is part of this chapter.
(14) "Immediate removal" or "immediately removes" means removal of the spilled oil, or portions thereof, from the receiving environment by the potentially liable party within six hours of spill initiation.
(15) "Initial department responder" means the department of ecology spill responder who first arrives at the scene of the spill.
(16) "Injury" or "injuries" means an adverse change, either long- or short-term, to a public resource resulting either directly or indirectly from exposure to a discharge of oil in violation of chapter 90.48 or 90.56 RCW.
(17) "Loss in services" means a temporary or permanent reduction in the ability of the resource to provide its use or benefit to the public or to other resources.
(18) "Loss in value or lost value" of a damaged resource means the amount equal to the sum of consumptive, nonconsumptive, and indirect use values, as well as lost taxation, leasing, and licensing revenues during the period between injury and restoration; indirect use values may include existence, bequest, option, and aesthetic values.
(19) "Marine and estuarine habitats" mean the habitats found in marine and estuarine waters of the state as defined in this chapter.
(20) "Marine birds" means all seabirds, shorebirds, waterfowl, raptors and other avifauna that are dependent on marine and estuarine environments of the state for some portion of their life requirements including feeding, breeding, and habitat.
(21) "Marine environment" means the habitat and all other public resources associated with or dependent on marine waters of the state.
(22) "Marine fish," in context of the compensation schedule, means the species listed in Appendix 2.
(23) "Marine mammals" means the cetaceans, pinnipeds, sea otters, and river otters associated with marine and estuarine waters of the state.
(24) "Marine waters" or "marine waters of the state" means all coastal waters not appreciably diluted by freshwater, including open coastal areas, straits, and euhaline inland waters extending from the seaward limit of state jurisdiction to:
(a) The landward limit of tidal inundation or wave splash; or
(b) The seaward limit of estuarine waters of the state.
(25) "Nonpersistent or group 1 oil" means:
(a) A petroleum-based oil, such as gasoline, diesel or jet fuel, which evaporates relatively quickly. Such oil, at the time of shipment, consists of hydrocarbon fractions of which:
(i) At least fifty percent, by volume, distills at a temperature of 340°C (645°F); and
(ii) At least ninety-five percent, by volume, distills at a temperature of 370°C (700°F); or
(b) A nonpetroleum oil with a specific gravity less than 0.8.
(c) For the purposes of WAC 173-183-870, any spilled oil that consists of a combination of spilled nonpersistent and spilled persistent oil, will be considered a nonpersistent oil.
(26) "Nonpetroleum oil" means oil of any kind that is not petroleum-based, including but not limited to: Biological oils such as fats and greases of animals and vegetable oils, including oils from seeds, nuts, fruits, and kernels.
(27) "Not quantifiable at a reasonable cost" means any diminution in value of a public resource that cannot be measured with sufficient precision or accuracy by currently available and accepted procedures within a reasonable time frame.
(28) "Oil" or "oils" means oil of any kind that is liquid at atmospheric temperature and pressure and any fractionation thereof, including, but not limited to, crude oil, petroleum gasoline, fuel oil, diesel oil, oil sludge, oil refuse, biological oils and blends, and oil mixed with wastes other than dredged spoil. Oil does not include any substance listed in Table 302.4 of C.F.R. Part 302 adopted August 14, 1989, under section 101(14) of the Federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act of 1980, as amended by P.L. 99-499.
(29) "On-scene coordinator" (OSC) means the department official who supervises the spill response team and compiles the initial report concerning the facts and circumstances of the spill for the department.
(30) "Persistent oil" means:
(a) Petroleum-based oil that does not meet the distillation criteria for a nonpersistent oil. Persistent oils are further classified based on both specific and American Petroleum Institute (API) observed gravities corrected to 60°F, as follows:
(i) Group 2 - Specific gravity greater than or equal to 0.8000 and less than 0.8500. API gravity less than or equal to 45.00 and greater than 35.0;
(ii) Group 3 - Specific gravity greater than or equal to 0.8500, and less than 0.9490. API gravity less than or equal to 35.0 and greater than 17.5;
(iii) Group 4 - Specific gravity greater than or equal to 0.9490 and up to and including 1.0. API gravity less than or equal to 17.5 and greater than 10.00; and
(iv) Group 5 - Specific gravity greater than 1.0000. API gravity equal to or less than 10.0.
(b) A nonpetroleum oil with a specific gravity of 0.8 or greater. These oils are further classified based on specific gravity as follows:
(i) Group 2 - Specific gravity equal to or greater than 0.8 and less than 0.85;
(ii) Group 3 - Specific gravity equal to or greater than 0.85 and less than 0.95;
(iii) Group 4 - Specific gravity equal to or greater than 0.95 and less than 1.0; or
(iv) Group 5 - Specific gravity equal to or greater than 1.0.
(31) "Person" means any political subdivision, government agency, municipality, industry, public or private corporation, copartnership, association, firm, individual, or any other entity whatsoever.
(32) "Potentially liable party" means the person or persons who may be liable for damages resulting from an oil spill.
(33) "Preassessment screening" means the investigation and determination of the facts and circumstances surrounding an oil spill which are used to determine whether a damage assessment investigation should be conducted, or alternatively, whether the compensation schedule will be used to assess damages.
(34) "Public resources" or "publicly owned resources" means fish, animals, vegetation, land, waters of the state, and other resources belonging to, managed by, held in trust by, appertaining to, or otherwise controlled by the state.
(35) "Reasonable cost" for a damage assessment means a cost that is anticipated to be less than the amount of damages that may have occurred or may occur.
(36) "Receiving environment" means waters of the state exposed to the spill and all public resources associated with or dependent on the exposed waters.
(37) "Recovered oil" is oil removed from the water using hand or mechanical techniques or oleophilic sorbent materials. It does not include spilled oil remobilized as a clean-up effort after shoreline contact and it does not include oil removed from the water's surface using dispersing or solidifying agents, or oil removed by burning.
(38) "Resource damage assessment committee" or "RDA committee" means the preassessment screening committee established under RCW 90.48.368 and charged with determining whether to conduct detailed damage assessment studies or to apply the compensation schedule for oil spills into waters of the state, and overseeing reconnaissance and damage assessment activities.
(39) "Restoration or enhancement projects or studies" means an activity that is intended to restore, replenish, restock, or replace public resources, or to further investigate the long-term effect of resource injuries as determined by the RDA committee for the benefit of the public.
(40) "Salmon," in context of the compensation schedule, means the species listed in Appendix 3.
(41) "Scientific advisory board" means the advisory group established by the department to assist in development of the compensation schedule as required by RCW 90.48.366.
(42) "Season" or "seasons" means winter, spring, summer, and/or fall, where winter occurs during the months December through February, spring occurs during the months March through May, summer occurs during the months June through August, and fall occurs during the months September through November.
(43) "Shellfish," in context of the compensation schedule, means the species listed in Appendix 4, but does not include privately grown shellfish on public lands.
(44) "Shoreline" for the purposes of WAC 173-183-870 only, means any interface between the surface of the waters of the state, including wetlands, and sediment or soil.
(45) "Spill" means an unauthorized discharge of oil into waters of the state.
(46) "State" means state of Washington.
(47) "State trustee agencies" means the state agencies with responsibility for protecting and/or managing public resources.
(48) "Subregion" or "subregions" means the areas into which state marine and estuarine waters have been divided for purposes of the compensation schedule as designated on the maps attached as Appendix 1.
(49) "Technical feasibility" or "technically feasible" means that given available technology, a restoration or enhancement project can be successfully completed at a cost that is not disproportionate to the value of the public resource before the injury.
(50) "Trust resources" means the public resource(s) under a particular state agency's jurisdiction for protection and/or management.
(51) "Unquantifiable damage" means any diminution in value of a public resource that cannot be measured with sufficient precision or accuracy by currently available and accepted procedures within a reasonable period of time.
(52) "Waters of the state" or "state waters" includes lakes, rivers, ponds, streams, inland waters, underground water, salt waters, estuaries, tidal flats, beaches, and lands adjoining the seacoast of the state, sewers, and all other surface waters and watercourses within the jurisdiction of the state of Washington.
(53) "Wetland" or "wetlands" means lands transitional between terrestrial and aquatic systems where the water table is usually at or near the surface or the land is covered by shallow water, and lands having one or more of the following attributes at least periodically: The land supports predominantly hydrophytes; the substrate is predominantly undrained hydric soil; and the substrate is nonsoil and saturated with water or covered by shallow water at some time during the growing season each year.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-100, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapters 90.56, 88.46, 90.48 RCW. WSR 07-22-119 (Order 07-14), § 173-183-100, filed 11/7/07, effective 12/8/07. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-100, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-200

Preassessment screening process.

(1) Findings from the preassessment screening shall be used to determine whether a formal damage assessment investigation should be conducted or whether the compensation schedule will be applied to assess public resource damages associated with spills of oil into state waters.
(2) The preassessment screening process shall occur concurrently with reconnaissance and cleanup activities as defined in WAC 173-183-220(2).
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-200, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-210

Incident discovery and reporting.

The state on-scene coordinator (OSC) or initial department responder, shall provide prompt notice to the committee chair when there is evidence of an oil spill into state waters.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-210, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-220

Initial site reconnaissance and notification of the RDA committee.

(1) The on-scene coordinator (OSC) or initial department responder to an oil spill shall report the following to the RDA committee chair as soon as practicable:
(a) Initial determination of the type and character of the oil(s) spilled;
(b) Initial determination of location of the spill, general type of habitat(s) impacted, geographic coverage of the spill, and amount of oil(s) spilled; and
(c) Initial determination of potentially liable party identity.
(2) The RDA committee chair shall notify RDA committee members of an oil spill as soon as practicable after receiving a report by the OSC or initial department responder, and provide a preliminary assessment of the potential risks to public resources.
(3) The RDA committee may, upon notification of an oil spill, initiate or authorize the RDA committee chair to initiate any necessary reconnaissance activities to:
(a) Further identify public resources at risk;
(b) Determine the extent to which public resources are, or may be, adversely affected;
(c) Document actual or potential injury to public resources; and
(d) Determine which local, state, and federal agencies and Indian tribes may have interests or jurisdiction over any of the public resources that may be adversely affected by the spill.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-220, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-230

RDA committee.

(1) The following state agencies shall have membership on the RDA committee: Departments of archaeology and historic preservation, ecology, fish and wildlife, health, natural resources, and the parks and recreation commission.
(2) Agencies with membership on the RDA committee shall nominate a representative and alternate to be appointed to the committee by the director.
(3) The department of ecology shall chair the RDA committee.
(4) The department may select representatives from the following agencies and governments for participation on the RDA committee on a spill-by-spill basis: Departments of emergency management, as well as other federal, state, and local agencies, and tribal and local governments whose presence would enhance reconnaissance or damage assessment activities of spill response.
If a selected representative declines or is unable to participate on the committee, the representative shall provide written notice to the department within twelve hours of being notified so that a replacement member may be appointed. Prompt consideration will be given to other local, state, or federal agency, or tribal government requests for participation on the RDA committee on a spill-by-spill basis.
(5) The RDA committee shall convene as soon as possible, but no later than thirty days after the department receives notification of a spill, or the next regularly scheduled meeting of the committee following a spill.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-230, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-230, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-240

Preassessment screening.

(1) The primary duty of the RDA committee during the preassessment screening is to determine whether detailed damage assessment studies should be conducted under RCW 90.48.367, or alternatively, whether the compensation schedule authorized under RCW 90.48.366 and 90.48.367 will be used to assess damages.
(2) The RDA committee shall consider information collected during reconnaissance and cleanup as well as other relevant background information pertaining to threatened public resources or resource use for the preassessment screening.
(3) The RDA committee shall consider the following factors when determining the type of damage assessment to be conducted:
(a) Whether evidence from reconnaissance investigations suggests that injury has occurred or is likely to occur to publicly owned resources;
(b) The potential loss in services provided by public resources injured or likely to be injured and the expected value of the potential loss;
(c) Whether a restoration project to return lost services is technically feasible;
(d) The accuracy of damage quantification methods that could be used and the anticipated cost-effectiveness of applying each method;
(e) The extent to which likely injury to public resources can be verified with available quantification methods; and
(f) Whether the injury, once quantified, can be translated into monetary values with sufficient precision or accuracy.
(4) The department shall apply the compensation schedule to determine the amount of damages if the RDA committee determines that:
(a) Restoration or enhancement of the injured resources is not technically feasible;
(b) Damages are not quantifiable at a reasonable cost; and
(c) The restoration and enhancement projects or studies proposed by the potentially liable party are insufficient to adequately compensate the people of the state for public resource damages.
(5) The RDA committee is encouraged to work cooperatively with the potentially liable party, to the greatest extent possible, to increase the efficiency of the damage assessment process, and shall provide for the ongoing involvement of the potentially liable party.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-240, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-250

Damage assessment studies.

(1) If the RDA committee, after considering the factors enumerated in WAC 173-183-240(3), determines that the damages to be investigated are quantifiable at a reasonable cost and that proposed assessment studies are clearly linked to quantification of the damages incurred, then the RDA committee may authorize damage assessment studies.
(2) If the RDA committee authorizes damage assessment studies under RCW 90.48.367(3), the RDA committee chair shall promptly notify the potentially liable party of this decision.
(3) The state trustee agency(ies) responsible for the potentially injured resource and habitat shall conduct the damage assessment studies and pursue all appropriate remedies with the responsible party. The RDA committee shall consider the proposed damage assessment studies and the effects of any proposed remedies in a timely manner, consistent with WAC 173-183-240(3).
(4) As new information becomes available, the committee may reevaluate the scope of damage assessment studies using the factors listed in WAC 173-183-240(3), and may reduce or expand the scope of damage assessment studies as appropriate.
(5) The department may negotiate with a potentially liable party to perform restoration and enhancement projects or studies which may substitute for all or part of the damages determined through the damage assessment studies.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-250, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-260

Restoration and enhancement projects proposed by the PLP.

(1) The potentially liable party (PLP) may propose restoration or enhancement projects or studies during the preassessment screening phase to substitute for some or all of:
(a) The damages calculated from the compensation schedule authorized under RCW 90.48.366 and 90.48.367; or
(b) The claims from damage assessment studies authorized under RCW 90.48.142 and 90.48.367.
(2) To be considered as part of the preassessment screening decision process specified in WAC 173-183-240, PLP proposals must be submitted to the RDA committee chair within ten days of PLP notification by the RDA committee.
(3) The RDA committee may accept the PLP proposal in lieu of some or all of:
(a) The damages calculated from the compensation schedule authorized under RCW 90.48.366 and 90.48.367; or
(b) The claims from damage assessment studies authorized under RCW 90.48.142 and 90.48.367.
(4) For the RDA committee to find a proposal sufficient to adequately compensate the people of the state for public resource damages, the PLP proposal must at least contain the following elements:
(a) An investigation of all potentially injured public resources to determine if they have been exposed to the spilled oil;
(b) Follow-up investigations on all public resources documented to be exposed to determine if exposure has resulted in injury;
(c) Follow-up investigations on all public resources documented to be injured by the spill to quantify the injury;
(d) Quantification of damages for all public resources where injury has been quantified; and
(e) Restoration/enhancement projects to compensate for public resource injuries to the extent technically feasible; and, for damages that cannot be compensated by technically feasible restoration or enhancement projects, implementation of projects/studies to compensate for these losses. Public resource restoration and enhancement projects and studies shall be prioritized as follows:
(i) On-site, in-kind;
(ii) Offsite, in-kind;
(iii) On-site, out-of-kind; and
(iv) Offsite, out-of-kind.
(5) Prior to the PLP initiating any projects or studies intended to substitute for damages, the PLP's proposal must be approved by the RDA committee. If a PLP proposal is found to be acceptable to the RDA committee, the committee shall notify the PLP of this decision.
(6) If RDA committee finds a PLP project and study plan proposal to be acceptable, the RDA committee shall oversee all projects and studies conducted by the PLP.
(7) Upon completion of the PLP's project and study plan, the RDA committee shall decide the extent to which the PLP's projects and studies substitute for public resource damages as identified in subsection (3) of this section.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-260, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-270

Participation.

To efficiently implement WAC 173-183-250 the RDA committee may develop public resource damage assessment agreements to facilitate cooperation between state and federal agencies and Indian tribes.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-270, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-300

Purpose.

The purpose of this section is to establish a compensation schedule that will provide a simple methodology for assessing damages to public resources from oil spills into fresh, marine, and estuarine waters of the state. The intent is to provide an alternate methodology to the extensive and expensive natural resource damage assessments presently being conducted following oil spills. This section provides the procedures for:
(1) Establishing the relative vulnerability of public resources to oil spills by taking into consideration the relative toxicity of the oil spilled and the sensitivity of public resources present in the receiving environment; and
(2) Determining adequate monetary compensation for injury to public resources resulting from an oil spill.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-300, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-310

Authority.

This regulation implements the establishment of a resource damage compensation schedule consistent with the provisions of RCW 90.48.366 for the discharge of oil in violation of chapter 90.48 or 90.56 RCW which requires the department to establish the compensation schedule in consultation with the departments of fisheries, wildlife, and natural resources, and the parks and recreation commission, and with the assistance of a scientific advisory board.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-310, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-320

Compensation schedule.

(1) The compensation schedule determines adequate compensation for unquantifiable damages or for damages not quantifiable at a reasonable cost for persons liable under RCW 90.48.142.
(2) Adequate compensation as determined from the compensation schedule is derived from preexisting information of resource vulnerability to a class of oil spilled in a particular subregion of the state during a particular season, plus any additional information collected at the reconnaissance stage of the spill response.
(3) Under RCW 90.48.366, the amount of compensation assessed under this schedule shall be:
(a) For spills totaling one thousand gallons or more in any one event, no less than three dollars per gallon of oil spilled and no greater than three hundred dollars per gallon of oil spilled; and
(b) For spills totaling less than one thousand gallons in any one event, no less than one dollar per gallon of oil spilled and no greater than one hundred dollars per gallon of oil spilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-320, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapters 90.56, 88.46, 90.48 RCW. WSR 07-22-119 (Order 07-14), § 173-183-320, filed 11/7/07, effective 12/8/07. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-320, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-330

Resource damage assessment using the compensation schedule.

The compensation schedule includes:
(1) A relative ranking for each of the classes of oil defined in this chapter as determined by their known chemical, physical, and mechanical properties, and other factors that may affect the severity and persistence of the spill on the receiving environment;
(2) A relative vulnerability ranking of receiving environments which takes into account location of the spill, habitat and public resource sensitivity to oil, seasonal distribution of public resources, areas of recreational use and aesthetic importance, the proximity of the spill to important habitats for birds, aquatic mammals, fish, or to species listed as threatened or endangered under state or federal law, and other areas of special ecological or recreational importance as determined by the department;
(3) A quantitative method for determining public resource damages resulting from an oil spill, based on the oil effects and vulnerability rankings designed to compensate the people of this state for those damages that cannot be quantified at a reasonable cost that result from oil spills; and
(4) A method for adjusting damages calculated under the compensation schedule based on recovery actions taken by the potentially liable party.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-330, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-330, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-340

Oil class ranking.

(1) The purpose of this section is to provide a relative ranking of the severity of effects caused by a spilled oil. The ranking is based on the known chemical, physical, and mechanical properties of oils in the six classes identified in this section, as well as other properties affecting propensity to cause acute toxicity and mechanical injury, and to persist in the environment. For purposes of the compensation schedule, relative rankings of the severity of effects caused by a spilled oil are provided for the following classes of oils:
(a) Prudhoe Bay crude oil;
(b) Bunker C;
(c) No. 2 fuel oil;
(d) Gasoline;
(e) Kerosene; and
(f) Kerosene-type jet fuel.
(2) The relative ranking scores for the oil classes range from 1 to 5, where 1 represents the least harmful effect and 5 represents the most harmful effect. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366 and 90.48.367, the acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence relative ranking scores for the oils described by the classes enumerated in subsection (1) of this section shall be as follows:
Table 1. Acute Toxicity, Mechanical Injury and Persistence Relative Ranking Scores for Classified Oils (OIL).
Oil Class
Acute
Toxicity
Mechanical Injury
Persistence
Prudhoe Bay Crude Oil
0.9
3.6
5
Bunker C
2.3
5.0
5
No. 2 Fuel Oil
2.3
3.2
2
Gasoline
5.0
1.0
1
Kerosene
1.4
2.4
1
Kerosene-type Jet Fuel
1.4
2.4
1
(3) In cases where the spilled oil is not described by any of the oil classes listed in subsection (1) of this section, or is a mixture of oils, the department shall determine the acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence scores as follows:
(a) By assigning the acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence scores assigned to the oil class best describing the spilled oil from subsection (2) of this section; or
(b) By using the following guidance to determine the acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence relative ranking scores:
(i) Acute toxicity relative ranking score. An acute toxicity raw score is determined by summing the weighted averages of the 1-, 2-, and 3-ringed aromatic compounds comprising the spilled oil and dividing this sum by 107, where aromatic compound composition is determined by percent-weight, and weighting is determined by aqueous solubility of the aromatic compounds, as described by the following formula:
Acute Toxicity Raw Score =
[(SOL1*PCT-WT1)+(SOL2*PCT-WT2)+(SOL3*PCT-WT3)]/107
where SOLi = solubility in seawater of i-ring aromatic hydrocarbons, and
PCT-WTi = percent weight of i-ring aromatic hydrocarbons in the spilled oil, i = 1, 2, and 3.
The final acute toxicity relative ranking score is determined by rounding the acute toxicity raw score to the nearest 0.1 using standard rounding procedures where decimals less than 0.05 are rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.05 are rounded up.
(ii) Mechanical injury relative ranking score. A mechanical injury raw score is determined by subtracting 0.688 from the specific gravity of the spilled oil and dividing this result by 0.062 as follows:
Mechanical Injury Score = (SP - 0.688)/0.062
where SP = specific gravity of the spilled oil.
The final mechanical injury ranking score is determined by rounding the mechanical injury raw score to the nearest 0.1 using standard rounding procedures where decimals less than 0.05 are rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.05 are rounded up.
(iii) Persistence relative ranking score. A persistence relative ranking score is determined from empirical data describing the length of time the spilled oil is known to, or is likely to, persist in a variety of habitat types. Scoring is assigned on a 1 to 5 scale as follows:
score
 
anticipated persistence
5
 
5 - 10 years or more
4
 
2 - 5 years
3
 
1 - 2 years
2
 
1 month to 1 year
1
 
days to weeks.
(4) In cases where the spilled oil is comprised of two or more types of oil, damages shall be calculated under the schedule for each oil type and then summed to calculate total damages liability.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-340, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-400

Vulnerability of marine and estuarine environments to oil spills.

(1) The purpose of this section is to describe the method of ranking vulnerability of marine and estuarine environments, excluding the Columbia River estuary environment to oil spills for the purposes of assessing damages using the compensation schedule.
(2) Marine and estuarine waters of the state excluding the Columbia River estuary are divided into sixteen regions and one hundred thirty-one subregions for purposes of RCW 90.48.366, as designated on the maps attached as Appendix 5 of this chapter.
(3) A spill vulnerability score (SVS) shall be calculated at the time of a spill for the most sensitive subregion and season impacted by the spill. The SVS rates the vulnerability of public resources to spilled oil based on the propensity of the oil to cause acute toxicity and mechanical injury, and to persist in the environment. SVS is determined by summing the vulnerability scores for marine birds, marine mammals, fishery species, recreational use and habitats for the subregion(s) and most sensitive season impacted by the spill. The formula to be used to calculate SVS for each of the three oil effects, acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence, is as follows:
Spill vulnerability score (SVS)ij=
HVSi + BVSj + MVSj + MFVSj + SFVSj + SAVSj + RVSj
where
HVSi = habitat vulnerability to oil's propensity to cause i
 
BVS = marine bird vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-420(3));
 
MVS = marine mammal vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-460(3));
 
MFVS = marine fisheries vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-430(3));
 
SFVS = shellfish vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-440(3));
 
SAVS = salmon vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-450(5));
 
RVS = recreation vulnerability score (WAC 173-183-470(3));
 
i = acute toxicity (AT), mechanical injury (MI), or persistence (PER); and
 
j = the most sensitive season affected by the spill: Spring, summer, fall, or winter
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-400, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-400, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-410

Marine and estuarine habitat vulnerability.

(1) The purpose of this section is to provide a marine and estuarine habitat vulnerability ranking. The marine and estuarine habitats present in the state are:
(a) Classified into thirty-seven types based on substrate type, energy regime and depth of occurrence; and
(b) Relatively ranked and scored for vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale, where a habitat vulnerability score (hv) of 5 represents the greatest vulnerability and an hv of 1 represents the least vulnerability.
(2) Marine and estuarine habitat vulnerability scores (hv) are based on the following:
(a) Presence of living public resources at risk, where living public resources include only those not otherwise incorporated into the compensation schedule in the marine fish, shellfish, salmon, marine mammal or marine bird vulnerability rankings of WAC 173-183-420 through 173-183-460; and
(b) Predicted sensitivity to the acute toxicity, mechanical injury and persistence effects of oil based on energy regime of the habitat and propensity to entrain oil.
(3) For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, marine and estuarine habitats of the state are classified into the following thirty-seven habitat types:
(a) Marine intertidal habitats.
(i) Exposed and semiexposed rocky shores. Bedrock and boulder habitats exposed to the full range of wave energies of the Pacific (i.e., on the outer coast), or to extensive wave fetch along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Rocky areas on the coast partly protected behind sea stacks or islands also fall into this category.
(ii) Sand-scoured rocky shores. Rocky headlands or sea stacks directly adjacent to high energy sandy beaches such that there is much suspended sand in the water, which scours the rock. Unique plants and animals are found here.
(iii) Protected rocky shores. Bedrock and boulder habitats lacking oceanic swell and extensive wave fetch; e.g., inside waters of the San Juan Islands, headlands in bays off the Strait of Juan de Fuca or well protected behind islands on the outer coast.
(iv) Semiexposed cobble and mixed-coarse beaches. Beaches exposed to moderate wave action composed of cobble overlying sand, or to somewhat less wave action, with a mix of cobble, gravel, and sand where no one component occupies more than seventy percent of the surface. Algae may grow on larger cobbles, and animals live both on the surface and in the sediment. Species vary dramatically with degree of wave exposure and composition of the sediment. Found inside the San Juan Islands, outside of Whidbey Island, at semiprotected sites along the Strait, and behind island and sea stacks on the coast.
(v) Semiexposed gravel beaches. Unstable beaches, containing some sand in more protected areas. Many sites along the Strait of Juan de Fuca.
(vi) Exposed sandy beaches. Pure marine sands found in moderate to high-energy areas, e.g., on the outer coast and along the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Mouths of bays with some wave action also fall into this category.
(vii) Semiprotected mixed-fine beaches. Mixed sand and silt habitats, found in bays and inlets with some wave action so they are not dominated by the finer sediments (muds). Patches of gravel may be present high on the shore.
(viii) Protected mud flats. Areas of little to no wave energy, where fine sediments settle and accumulate organic matter. Found in calm bays and inlets with little freshwater influx (i.e., not estuaries).
(b) Marine subtidal.
(i) Shallow subtidal rock and boulders. Areas less than 15 m depth with some currents so that sediments do not totally cover bedrock. Kelp beds are found in these habitats, which are widespread in the state.
(ii) Deep subtidal rock and boulders. Areas deeper than 15 m and thus lacking in significant algal cover, but still with enough currents to keep the substrate exposed. Common in the San Juans and the Strait.
(iii) Deep subtidal cobble and mixed-coarse areas. "Scoured" areas in channels or passes with high currents, composed entirely of cobbles or with gravel and sand mixed in.
(iv) Shallow subtidal mixed-coarse to mixed-fine areas (low energy). Areas ranging from cobbles lying over a matrix of sand and gravel to mixed sand and silt, in waters less than 15 m. Bays and inlets commonly have this range of substrate types. Plants and animals exist both on the cobbles and in the sediment.
(v) Shallow subtidal gravel or mixed-fine areas (high energy). Areas just offshore of sand or gravel beaches, where swells or wave action keep fine sediments from accumulating. Substrates range from pure gravel to gravel mixed with sand and shells. Common in the Strait.
(vi) Deep subtidal sand. Areas deeper than 15 m in the Strait or on the coast where swells keep the substratum fairly coarse.
(vii) Deep subtidal mixed-fine areas. Areas of sand, shells, and pebbles with some currents removing finer particles.
(viii) Deep subtidal muddy areas. Areas with no swell and few currents, where fine silts settle out and accumulate organic matter.
(ix) Open water. Areas deeper than 20 m.
(c) Estuarine intertidal.
(i) Open rocky shores. Rocky intertidal areas (including hardpan and riprap) in areas exposed to moderate waves or currents, e.g., on headlands in Puget Sound.
(ii) Open mixed-coarse beaches. One of the most common beach types in Puget Sound, composed of a mix of cobble, gravel, and sand in areas with some wave action that keeps finer silts suspended. Sparse salt marsh vegetation may occur at the tops of these beaches, especially in quieter areas.
(iii) Open gravel beaches. Areas of gravel or pebbles, often overlying sand, in areas of moderate wave action.
(iv) Open sandy beaches. Common habitats of gently sloping beaches but moderate wave action. May have gravel on the upper shore. Found in Puget Sound and in some areas of other estuaries, including Grays Harbor.
(v) Sandy low marshes. Found on spits, berms, and deltas where sand collects. Areas of different salinities are dominated by different marsh plant communities. Widespread (although disturbed) throughout the Puget Trough.
(vi) Mixed-fine beaches and low marshes. Found in backwaters or deltas away from large channels, where the substrate is mixed sand and mud, sometimes with patches of gravel or peat. Substrate is stable and organic-rich. Marsh communities vary with salinity.
(vii) Saline lagoons. Areas where water-borne sediments are deposited into a spit closing off an embayment, which is flushed regularly or irregularly. Salinities vary with evaporation and runoff but are generally high.
(viii) Low-salinity lagoons. Lagoons that are nearly separated from tidal/salt influence by a berm, and where there is a source of freshwater. Substrate is usually soft silt. This habitat is rare in the state.
(ix) Mud flats. Areas lacking in gravel or significant amounts of sand due to limited wave action, usually found in the heads of bays and inlets. Includes undisturbed channels and sloughs which drain slowly through a tidal cycle, and which may contain some sand.
(x) High salt marshes. Areas above normal high water but salt influenced, with organic/peat substrata. Salinities vary, and plant communities with them.
(xi) Transition zone wetland. Areas transitional between salt marshes and uplands, where salt water only rarely inundates. Substrata are peat or fine silts.
(d) Estuarine subtidal.
(i) Shallow subtidal rock and boulders. Areas less than 15 m deep with moderate currents or wave action that remove silt. Kelp beds develop here.
(ii) Deep subtidal rock and boulders. Areas in narrow channels or around headlands where currents remove sediment that otherwise would settle in these deeper areas. These habitats are essentially marine, since freshwater tends to stay layered in shallow water.
(iii) Shallow subtidal cobble and mixed-coarse areas. Mixed cobble, gravel, and sand remain in shallow areas fairly open to wave action or currents.
(iv) Deep subtidal cobble and mixed-coarse areas. Tidal currents running through deep channels in Puget Sound keep fine silts from settling and create areas of mixed cobbles, sand, and gravel.
(v) Shallow subtidal sandy or mixed-fine areas. High-current areas with little debris and some gravel, or less current-swept with more debris. Both are common outside of enclosed bays in Puget Sound.
(vi) Deep subtidal sandy or mixed-fine areas. Current-swept areas below 15 m. Organic debris and gravel tend to accumulate deeper (below 30 m), leading to different assemblages there.
(vii) Shallow subtidal muddy bays. Common habitats in open to partly enclosed bays in Puget Sound, where limited water movement allows fine sediments to accumulate. Organic enrichment is high, especially in more enclosed bays.
(viii) Deep subtidal muddy bays. Habitats in the heads and centers of inlets in Puget Sound where there is little motion and the substrate is soft mud and sand. Assemblages vary with depth and amount of organic debris accumulated.
(ix) Open water. Areas deeper than twenty meters.
(4) For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, marine and estuarine habitat vulnerability scores (hv) for each of the habitat types classified in subsection (3) of this section shall be as follows:
TABLE 2. Habitat Vulnerability for a Single Habitat Type and Oil Effect (hv)
 
habitat vulnerability (hv)
habitat type
acute
mech
pers
 
(hvAT)
(hvMI)
(hvPER)
marine intertidal
Exposed and semiexposed rock
shores
3.7
4.3
3.1
Sand-scoured rocky shores
3.3
3.8
2.7
Protected rocky shores
3.0
3.5
3.0
Semiexposed cobble and
mixed-coarse beaches
3.2
3.2
3.2
Semiexposed gravel beaches
3.2
1.4
2.0
Exposed sandy beaches
2.9
1.3
1.8
Semiprotected mixed-fine beaches
3.2
2.6
3.7
Protected mud flats
3.8
2.7
4.3
marine subtidal
Shallow subtidal rock and boulders
3.7
3.7
3.1
Deep subtidal rock and boulders
2.7
2.7
3.3
Deep subtidal cobble and mixed
coarse
1.5
2.2
2.2
Shallow subtidal mixed-coarse to
mixed-fine
3.6
3.6
3.6
Shallow subtidal gravel or
mixed-fine
2.8
1.6
2.3
Deep subtidal sand
1.6
2.0
1.6
Deep subtidal mixed-fine
1.5
2.6
3.1
Deep subtidal muddy
2.0
2.0
3.2
Open water
5.0
3.2
2.2
estuarine intertidal
Open rocky shores
3.0
3.5
3.0
Open mixed-coarse beaches and
low marsh
3.7
3.2
3.2
Open gravel beaches
3.4
1.5
2.2
Open sandy beaches
3.3
2.8
2.3
Sandy low marshes
3.5
3.0
3.0
Mixed-fine beaches and low
marshes
4.3
4.3
4.3
Saline lagoons
3.7
3.7
4.1
Low-salinity lagoons
3.0
3.5
3.9
Mud flats
3.7
2.6
4.1
High salt marshes
3.0
3.5
3.9
Transition zone wetlands
3.0
3.5
3.9
estuarine subtidal
Shallow subtidal rock and boulders
3.2
3.2
2.6
Deep subtidal rock and boulders
2.3
2.3
2.8
Shallow subtidal cobble and
mixed-coarse
2.6
3.2
3.2
Deep subtidal cobble and
mixed-coarse
1.5
2.2
2.2
Shallow subtidal sandy or
mixed-fine
3.2
3.2
3.2
Deep subtidal sandy or mixed-fine
2.0
2.4
2.8
Shallow subtidal muddy bays
3.0
2.4
3.9
Deep subtidal muddy bays
1.8
1.8
2.9
Open water
5.0
3.2
2.2
(5) When seagrass or kelp are present in a particular habitat type, the portion of the habitat type with seagrass or kelp shall be treated as a separate habitat type. The habitat vulnerability for a particular habitat type and oil effect (hv) shall be multiplied by a factor of 1.5 for habitat types with seagrass or kelp present. The RDA committee shall be responsible for determining whether seagrass or kelp are present in a habitat type, and the portion of a habitat type containing seagrass or kelp.
(6) In general, several of the habitat types classified in this section may be affected by a particular spill. The habitat vulnerability score for a particular spill and oil effect (HVSi) is composite of the habitat vulnerability scores for each of the habitat types affected by the spill which takes into consideration the percent coverage of each habitat type in the area of spill impact.
(7) The habitat vulnerability score for a particular spill and oil effect (HVS) shall be determined as follows:
(a) For spills of 1,000 gallons or more. Sum the weighted habitat vulnerability scores for each habitat type exposed to the spill as described by the formula provided in (c) of this subsection, where weighting is defined by percent coverage of each habitat type within the area of spill exposure.
(b) For spills of less than 1,000 gallons. Sum the weighted habitat vulnerability scores for each habitat type present in the subregion(s) exposed to the spill as described by the formula provided in (c) of this subsection, where weighting is defined by percent coverage of each habitat type present in the subregion(s) exposed to the spill.
(c) The formula to calculate the raw habitat vulnerability score for a particular spill and oil effect (HVSi) is as follows:
 
HVSi = |nj=1 (hvij x PCj)
where
PCj = Percent-coverage of habitat-type j expressed as a decimal;
 
hvij = habitat vulnerability for a particular habitat type & oil effect;
 
j = habitat type;
 
i = acute toxicity (AT), mechanical injury (MI) and persistence (PER); and
 
n = number of habitats to be considered as determined under (a) and (b) of this subsection.
(d) The final HVSAT, HVSMI, and HVSPER scores are found by rounding the raw scores calculated from the formula in (c) of this subsection to the nearest 0.01 as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-410, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-420

Marine bird vulnerability.

(1) Each of the marine and estuarine subregions of state waters established in WAC 173-183-400(2) is relatively ranked and scored for marine bird vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale for each season, where a score of 5 represents the greatest vulnerability and a score of 1 represents the least vulnerability.
(2) The marine bird vulnerability ranking relatively ranks the vulnerability of seabirds, shorebirds, and waterfowl present in a subregion during a particular season to oil spills, where vulnerability is based on population status, abundance, roosting habits, escape behavior, flocking behavior, feeding specialization, population size, reproductive capacity, breeding dispersion, winter dispersion, seasonal exposure to waters where oil spills could occur, and significance of Washington population to total population.
(3) Marine bird seasonal vulnerability scores for each of the marine and estuarine subregions defined in WAC 173-183-400 are based on existing information and determinations made by the marine bird subcommittee of the scientific advisory board. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, marine bird seasonal vulnerability scores (BVS) for each of the subregions defined in WAC 173-183-400 shall be as follows:
Table 4. Subregional Marine Bird Vulnerability Scores (BVS)
SUBREGION
SP
SU
FA
WI
101
NORTHERN OUTER COAST
5
5
5
5
102
KALALOCH
5
5
5
5
103
QUINAULT
5
5
5
5
104
COPALIS BEACH
5
5
5
5
105
GRAYS HARBOR
5
5
5
5
106
TWIN HARBORS BEACH
5
5
5
5
107
WILLAPA BAY
5
5
5
5
108
LONG BEACH
5
5
5
5
109
INNER SHELF
4
2
5
5
110
OUTER SHELF
4
1
1
1
111
SHELF EDGE
5
1
1
1
112
CONTINENTAL SLOPE
2
1
1
1
201
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-OUTER
3
2
5
4
203
CAPE FLATTERY
4
3
4
3
204
NEAH BAY
2
2
2
2
205
NEAH BAY TO CLALLAM BAY
2
3
3
2
206
CLALLAM BAY
2
2
2
2
207
CLALLAM BAY TO CRESCENT BAY
2
3
3
2
208
CRESCENT BAY
2
2
2
2
209
CRESCENT BAY TO EDIZ HOOK
2
2
2
4
301
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-INNER
3
3
3
4
302
EDIZ HOOK
1
1
1
1
303
PORT ANGELES
2
3
3
2
304
VOICE OF AMERICA
2
2
2
2
305
DUNGENESS SPIT
2
2
2
3
306
DUNGENESS BAY/HARBOR
4
2
2
3
307
JAMESTOWN
5
5
5
5
308
SEQUIM BAY
2
1
1
2
309
MILLER PENINSULA
2
2
2
3
310
PROTECTION ISLAND
4
5
5
3
311
DISCOVERY BAY
3
1
1
4
312
QUIMPER PENINSULA
2
3
3
4
313
WHIDBEY ISLAND
1
2
2
2
314
SMITH ISLAND
3
5
5
3
315
DECEPTION PASS
2
2
2
2
316
LOPEZ ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
5
4
4
3
317
SAN JUAN IS. (SOUTH SHORE)
2
2
2
2
401
ADMIRALTY INLET
3
5
5
2
402
SOUTH ADMIRALTY INLET
2
1
2
3
403
PORT TOWNSEND
3
2
3
4
404
OAK BAY
2
2
2
2
405
KILISUT HARBOR
3
2
3
4
501
BELLINGHAM CHANNEL
2
2
4
4
502
GUEMES CHANNEL
2
2
1
3
503
FIDALGO BAY
2
2
2
3
504
PADILLA BAY
5
5
4
5
505
SAMISH BAY
5
5
4
5
506
BELLINGHAM BAY
4
4
4
5
507
HALE PASSAGE
3
3
2
2
601
LUMMI BAY
5
5
3
4
602
CHERRY POINT
5
5
2
2
603
BIRCH BAY
4
4
3
3
604
SEMIAHOO SPIT
4
4
4
4
605
DRAYTON HARBOR
3
3
3
4
607
SAN JUAN IS.-NORTHERN TIER
3
3
2
4
608
GEORGIA STRAIT-EASTERN
4
4
4
4
701
PT. ROBERTS
4
4
2
4
703
GEORGIA STRAIT-WESTERN
2
2
2
2
801
NORTHERN HARO STRAIT
2
2
4
3
802
SOUTHERN HARO STRAIT
1
1
1
2
901
SOUTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
3
3
3
5
902
CENTRAL ROSARIO STRAIT
3
3
5
4
903
NORTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
5
5
5
4
1001
PRESIDENT CHANNEL
2
2
2
2
1002
NORTHERN AREAS
1
1
2
3
1101
SPEIDEN CHANNEL
1
1
2
2
1102
NORTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
1
1
1
1
1103
SOUTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
1
1
2
3
1104
WASP PASS
1
1
1
2
1105
UPRIGHT CHANNEL
1
1
2
2
1106
HARNEY CHANNEL
1
1
1
2
1107
OBSTRUCTION PASS
2
2
3
2
1108
THATCHER PASS
1
1
1
1
1201
MOSQUITO/ROCHE COMPLEX
2
2
2
3
1202
FRIDAY HARBOR
2
2
2
2
1203
GRIFFIN BAY
2
2
2
3
1205
FISHERMAN BAY
2
2
2
3
1206
SWIFTS/SHOAL BAYS
2
2
2
2
1207
DEER HARBOR
2
2
2
2
1208
WEST SOUND
1
1
2
2
1209
EAST SOUND
2
2
1
2
1210
LOPEZ SOUND
2
2
3
4
1401
SKAGIT BAY
5
3
2
1
1402
PENN COVE/CRESCENT HARBOR
5
3
2
1
1403
SARATOGA PASSAGE
5
1
2
2
1404
HOLMES HARBOR
4
2
3
3
1405
PORT SUSAN
3
1
1
1
1406
POSSESSION SOUND
3
1
2
2
1501
HOOD CANAL ENTRANCE
2
1
2
3
1502
PORT LUDLOW
2
2
2
2
1503
PORT GAMBLE
2
2
2
2
1504
NORTHERN HOOD CANAL
2
1
2
2
1505
CENTRAL HOOD CANAL
2
1
2
2
1506
DABOB BAY
2
1
2
3
1507
QUILCENE BAY
2
2
2
2
1508
SOUTHCENTRAL HOOD CANAL
2
1
2
3
1509
ANNAS BAY
2
2
2
2
1510
GREAT BEND
3
1
3
5
1601
N. PUGET SOUND
4
1
2
2
1602
N. CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
2
1
2
2
1603
CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
2
1
2
2
1604
ELLIOT BAY
2
2
2
1
1605
EAST PASSAGE
2
1
2
2
1606
COLVOS PASSAGE
2
1
2
2
1607
COMMENCEMENT BAY
2
2
2
2
1608
NARROWS
3
2
3
4
1609
STEILACOOM
2
1
2
3
1610
NISQUALLY
2
1
2
3
1611
TREBLE-JOHNSON
2
2
2
2
1612
HALE PASSAGE
3
2
3
3
1613
CARR INLET
3
1
3
4
1614
PITT PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1615
DRAYTON HARBOR
2
2
2
2
1616
CASE INLET
2
1
2
3
1617
HENDERSON INLET
2
2
2
1
1618
DANA PASSAGE
2
2
2
1
1619
BUDD INLET
2
2
2
2
1620
ELD INLET
2
2
2
2
1621
TOTTEN INLET
2
2
2
2
1622
PICKERING PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1623
PEALE PASSAGE
2
2
2
1
1624
SQUAXIN
2
2
2
2
1625
SKOOKUM INLET
2
2
2
2
1626
HAMMERSLEY INLET
2
2
2
2
1627
OAKLAND BAY
2
2
2
2
1628
AGATE PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1629
LIBERTY BAY
3
2
3
3
1630
PORT ORCHARD
2
2
2
2
1631
SINCLAIR INLET
3
2
3
3
1632
DYES INLET
2
2
2
2
1633
RICH PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1634
QUARTERMASTER HARBOR
3
2
3
3
1635
DALCO PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1636
BALCH PASS
2
2
2
2
(4) The marine bird vulnerability score for a spill shall be multiplied by 1.5 when any number of state or federal threatened or endangered marine birds are exposed to spilled oil.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-420, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-430

Marine fisheries vulnerability.

(1) Each of the subregions designated in WAC 173-183-430 is relatively ranked and scored for marine fisheries vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale for each season where 5 represents the most vulnerable ranking and 1 represents the least vulnerable ranking.
(2) The marine fisheries vulnerability ranking relatively ranks the vulnerability of marine fisheries species present in a subregion to oil spills, where vulnerability is based on habitat preference, population status, abundance, fecundity, and sensitivity of life stages.
(3) Marine fisheries seasonal vulnerability scores for each of the marine and estuarine subregions are based on existing information and recommendations of the marine fisheries subcommittee. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366 marine fisheries seasonal vulnerability ranking scores (MFVS) for the subregions defined in WAC 173-183-400 are as follows:
Table 5. Subregional Marine Fisheries Vulnerability Scores (MFVS)
SUBREGION
SEASON
SP
SU
FA
WI
101
NORTHERN OUTER COAST
5
3
3
5
102
KALALOCH
5
3
3
5
103
QUINAULT
5
3
3
5
104
COPALIS BEACH
5
3
3
5
105
GRAYS HARBOR
5
5
5
5
106
TWIN HARBORS BEACH
5
3
3
4
107
WILLAPA BAY
5
5
5
5
108
LONG BEACH
5
3
3
4
109
INNER SHELF
5
3
3
4
110
OUTER SHELF
4
2
2
4
111
SHELF EDGE
4
1
2
3
112
CONTINENTAL SLOPE
2
1
1
1
201
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-OUTER
5
3
3
4
203
CAPE FLATTERY
5
3
3
4
204
NEAH BAY
5
3
3
4
205
NEAH BAY TO CLALLAM BAY
5
3
3
4
206
CLALLAM BAY
5
3
3
4
207
CLALLAM BAY TO CRESCENT BAY
5
3
3
4
208
CRESCENT BAY
5
3
3
4
209
CRESCENT BAY TO EDIZ HOOK
5
3
3
4
301
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-INNER
5
3
3
4
302
EDIZ HOOK
5
3
3
4
303
PORT ANGELES
5
3
3
4
304
VOICE OF AMERICA
5
3
3
4
305
DUNGENESS SPIT
5
3
3
4
306
DUNGENESS BAY/HARBOR
5
3
3
4
307
JAMESTOWN
5
3
3
4
308
SEQUIM BAY
5
3
3
4
309
MILLER PENINSULA
5
3
3
4
310
PROTECTION ISLAND
5
3
3
4
311
DISCOVERY BAY
5
3
3
4
312
QUIMPER PENINSULA
5
3
3
4
313
WHIDBEY ISLAND
5
3
3
4
314
SMITH ISLAND
5
3
3
4
315
DECEPTION PASS
5
3
3
4
316
LOPEZ ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
5
3
3
4
317
SAN JUAN ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
5
3
3
4
401
ADMIRALTY INLET
5
4
3
5
402
SOUTH ADMIRALTY INLET
5
4
3
5
403
PORT TOWNSEND
5
4
3
5
404
OAK BAY
5
4
3
5
405
KILISUT HARBOR
5
4
3
5
501
BELLINGHAM CHANNEL
5
4
3
5
502
GUEMES CHANNEL
5
4
3
5
503
FIDALGO BAY
5
4
3
5
504
PADILLA BAY
5
4
3
5
505
SAMISH BAY
5
3
3
5
506
BELLLINGHAM BAY
5
3
3
5
507
HALE PASSAGE
5
3
3
5
601
LUMMI BAY
5
3
3
5
602
CHERRY POINT
5
3
3
5
603
BIRCH BAY
5
3
3
5
604
SEMIAHOO SPIT
5
3
3
5
605
DRAYTON HARBOR
5
3
3
5
607
SAN JUAN ISLANDS-NORTHERN TIER
5
3
3
4
608
GEORGIA STRAIT-EASTERN
5
3
3
5
701
PT. ROBERTS
5
3
3
5
703
GEORGIA STRAIT-WESTERN
5
3
3
5
801
NORTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
3
3
4
802
SOUTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
3
3
4
901
SOUTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
5
3
3
4
902
CENTRAL ROSARIO STRAIT
5
3
3
4
903
NORTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
5
3
3
4
1001
PRESIDENT CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1002
NORTHERN AREAS
5
3
3
4
1101
SPEIDEN CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1102
NORTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1103
SOUTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1104
WASP PASS
5
3
3
4
1105
UPRIGHT CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1106
HARNEY CHANNEL
5
3
3
4
1107
OBSTRUCTION PASS
5
3
3
4
1108
THATCHER PASS
5
3
3
4
1201
MOSQUITO/ROCHE COMPLEX
5
3
3
4
1202
FRIDAY HARBOR
5
3
3
4
1203
GRIFFIN BAY
5
3
3
4
1205
FISHERMAN BAY
5
3
3
4
1206
SWIFTS/SHOAL BAYS
5
3
3
4
1207
DEER HARBOR
5
3
3
4
1208
WEST SOUND
5
3
3
4
1209
EAST SOUND
5
3
3
4
1210
LOPEZ SOUND
5
3
3
4
1401
SKAGIT BAY
5
4
3
5
1402
PENN COVE /CRESCENT HARBOR
5
4
3
5
1403
SARATOGA PASSAGE
5
4
3
5
1404
HOLMES HARBOR
5
4
3
5
1405
PORT SUSAN
5
4
3
5
1406
POSSESSION SOUND
5
4
3
5
1501
HOOD CANAL ENTRANCE
2
1
1
2
1502
PORT LUDLOW
2
1
1
2
1503
PORT GAMBLE
2
1
1
2
1504
NORTHERN HOOD CANAL
2
1
1
2
1505
CENTRAL HOOD CANAL
2
1
1
2
1506
DABOB BAY
2
1
1
2
1507
QUILCENE BAY
2
1
1
2
1508
SOUTHCENTRAL HOOD CANAL
2
1
1
2
1509
ANNAS BAY
2
1
1
2
1510
GREAT BEND
2
1
1
2
1601
N. PUGET SOUND
5
4
3
5
1602
N. CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
5
4
3
5
1603
CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
5
4
3
5
1604
ELLIOT BAY
5
4
3
5
1605
EAST PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1606
COLVOS PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1607
COMMENCEMENT BAY
4
3
2
3
1608
NARROWS
4
3
2
3
1609
STEILACOOM
4
3
2
3
1610
NISQUALLY
4
3
2
3
1611
TREBLE-JOHNSON
4
3
2
3
1612
HALE PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1613
CARR INLET
4
3
2
3
1614
PITT PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1615
DRAYTON HARBOR
4
3
2
3
1616
CASE INLET
4
3
2
3
1617
HENDERSON INLET
4
3
2
3
1618
DANA PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1619
BUDD INLET
4
3
2
3
1620
ELD INLET
4
3
2
3
1621
TOTTEN INLET
4
3
2
3
1622
PICKERING PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1623
PEALE PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1624
SQUAXIN
4
3
2
3
1625
SKOOKUM INLET
4
3
2
3
1626
HAMMERSLEY INLET
4
3
2
3
1627
OAKLAND BAY
4
3
2
3
1628
AGATE PASSAGE
5
4
3
5
1629
LIBERTY BAY
5
5
5
5
1630
PORT ORCHARD
5
5
5
5
1631
SINCLAIR INLET
5
5
5
5
1632
DYES INLET
5
5
5
5
1633
RICH PASSAGE
5
5
5
5
1634
QUARTERMASTER HARBOR
4
3
2
3
1635
DALCO PASSAGE
4
3
2
3
1636
BALCH PASS
4
3
2
3
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-430, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-440

Shellfish vulnerability.

(1) Each of the subregions designated in WAC 173-183-430 is relatively ranked and scored for shellfish vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale for each season where 5 represents the most vulnerable ranking and 1 represents the least vulnerable ranking.
(2) Shellfish vulnerability ranking relatively ranks the vulnerability of shellfish present in a subregion to oil spills, where vulnerability is based on habitat preference, population status, abundance, fecundity, and sensitivity of life stages.
(3) Shellfish seasonal vulnerability scores for each of the marine and estuarine subregions are based on existing information and recommendations of the shellfish subcommittee of the scientific advisory board. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366 shellfish seasonal vulnerability ranking scores (SFVS) for the subregions defined in WAC 173-183-400 are as follows:
Table 6. Shellfish Vulnerability Scores (SFVS)
Region/Subregion
SP
SU
FA
WI
101
 
4
4
4
4
102
 
5
5
5
5
103
 
3
3
3
3
104
 
4
4
4
4
105
 
2
2
2
2
106
 
3
3
2
2
107
 
4
4
4
4
108
 
4
3
3
3
109
 
5
5
5
5
110
 
1
1
1
1
111
 
1
1
1
1
112
 
1
1
1
1
2
 
5
5
5
5
3
 
5
5
5
5
401
 
2
1
1
2
402
 
3
3
3
3
403
 
4
4
3
4
404
 
3
3
3
3
405
 
4
4
3
4
5
 
5
5
5
5
6
 
5
5
4
5
7
 
5
5
4
5
8
 
4
3
3
4
9
 
4
3
3
4
1
 
4
3
3
4
11
 
4
3
3
4
12
 
4
3
3
4
1401
 
2
3
3
2
1402
 
1
1
1
1
1403
 
1
1
1
1
1404
 
1
1
1
1
1405
 
1
2
2
1
1406
 
1
2
2
1
1501
 
2
2
2
2
1502
 
2
2
2
2
1503
 
2
2
2
2
1504
 
3
3
2
2
1505
 
3
3
2
2
1506
 
3
3
2
2
1507
 
3
3
2
2
1508
 
3
4
3
3
1509
 
3
4
3
3
1510
 
3
4
3
3
1601
 
2
2
2
2
1602
 
2
2
2
2
1603
 
2
2
2
2
1604
 
2
2
2
2
1605
 
2
2
2
2
1606
 
2
2
2
2
1607
 
2
2
2
2
1608
 
2
1
1
2
1609
 
5
5
5
5
1610
 
5
5
5
5
1611
 
5
5
5
5
1612
 
5
5
5
5
1613
 
5
5
5
5
1614
 
5
5
5
5
1615
 
5
5
5
5
1616
 
5
5
4
5
1617
 
5
5
5
5
1618
 
1
1
1
1
1619
 
4
5
4
4
1620
 
4
5
4
4
1621
 
4
5
4
4
1622
 
5
5
4
5
1623
 
4
5
4
4
1624
 
4
5
4
4
1625
 
4
5
4
4
1626
 
4
5
4
4
1627
 
4
5
4
4
1628
 
4
3
3
3
1629
 
4
3
3
3
1630
 
4
3
3
3
1631
 
4
3
3
3
1632
 
4
3
3
3
1633
 
4
3
3
3
1634
 
2
2
2
2
1635
 
2
2
2
2
1636
 
5
5
5
5
(4) The shellfish vulnerability score for a spill shall be multiplied by 1.5 when any number of individuals of state or federal threatened or endangered shellfish species are exposed to spilled oil.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-440, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-450

Salmon vulnerability.

(1) The salmon vulnerability ranking is based on seasonal habitat preference of juveniles during outmigration, adults as they return to spawn and the presence of oil in river mouths during peak occurrence of salmon runs. The salmon vulnerability ranking was developed from existing information and determinations of the salmon subcommittee of the scientific advisory board. In the case of Chinook salmon, habitat preference differs for subyearlings and yearlings.
(2) The vulnerability of five salmon species in nine habitats are relatively scored for vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale for each season, where 5 represents the most vulnerable condition, and a score of 1 represents the least vulnerable condition, as follows:
Table 7. Vulnerability of Salmon Species and/or Species Yearclass byHabitat and Season
SPECIES/YEARCLASS and SALMON VULNERABILITY HABITAT
HABITAT VULNERABILITY SCORE (savs) SEASON
 
SP
SU
FA
WI
Chinook (subyearling)
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
1
1
1
1
 
Cobble
2
2
1
1
 
Gravel
3
3
2
2
 
Sand (vegetated)
4
5
3
3
 
Sand (no vegetation)
3
3
2
2
 
Mud (vegetated)
4
5
3
3
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
3
2
3
Subtidal
2
2
1
1
Pelagic
4
4
3
3
Chinook (yearling)
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
1
1
1
1
 
Cobble
3
3
2
2
 
Gravel
3
3
3
2
 
Sand (vegetated)
3
3
2
2
 
Sand (no vegetation)
3
3
2
2
 
Mud (vegetated)
3
3
2
2
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
3
2
2
Subtidal
2
2
1
1
Pelagic
4
4
3
3
Coho
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
1
1
1
1
 
Cobble
3
2
2
2
 
Gravel
3
4
2
2
 
Sand (vegetated)
5
4
3
4
 
Sand (no vegetation)
3
2
2
3
 
Mud (vegetated)
5
4
3
4
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
4
2
3
Subtidal
2
2
1
1
Pelagic
4
4
3
3
Pink
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
1
1
1
1
 
Cobble
2
1
1
1
 
Gravel
3
1
1
3
 
Sand (vegetated)
5
2
2
5
 
Sand (no vegetation)
3
2
2
3
 
Mud (vegetated)
5
2
2
5
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
1
1
3
Subtidal
2
1
1
1
Pelagic
4
2
2
2
Chum
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
1
1
1
1
 
Cobble
2
1
1
1
 
Gravel
3
2
2
3
 
Sand (vegetated)
5
3
2
5
 
Sand (no vegetation)
3
2
2
3
 
Mud (vegetated)
5
4
2
5
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
2
2
3
Subdtidal
2
2
1
1
Pelagic
4
4
2
2
Sockeye
 
 
 
 
Intertidal
 
 
 
 
 
Rocky
2
2
1
1
 
Cobble
2
1
1
1
 
Gravel
2
1
1
1
 
Sand (vegetated)
2
1
1
1
 
Sand (no vegetation)
2
1
1
1
 
Mud (vegetated)
2
1
1
1
 
Mud (no vegetation)
3
1
1
1
Subtidal
1
2
1
1
Pelagic
4
4
2
2
The habitat-types classified under WAC 173-183-400 correlate with the habitats listed in Table 7 as follows:
TABLE. 8. KEY TO TRANSLATINC MARINE/ESTUARINE HABITAT TYPES CLASSIFIED UNDER WAC 173-183-410 TO SALMON VULNERABILITY HABITATS
MARINE/ESTUARINE HABITAT TYPE from WAC 173-183-410(3)
EQUIVALENT SALMON VULNERABILITY HABITAT
Marine Intertidal, exposed and semiexposed rocky shores
Intertidal, rocky
Marine Intertidal, sand-scoured rocky shores
Intertidal, rocky
Marine Intertidal, protected rocky shores
Intertidal, rocky
Estuarine Intertidal, open rocky shores
Intertidal, rocky
Marine Intertidal, semiexposed cobble and mixed-course beaches
Intertidal, cobble
Estuarine Intertidal, open mixed-course beaches
Intertidal, cobble
Marine Intertidal, semiexposed gravel beaches
Intertidal, gravel
Estuarine Intertidal, open gravel beaches
Intertidal, gravel
Marine Intertidal, exposed sandy beaches
Intertidal, sand (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Marine Intertidal, semiprotected mixed-fine beaches
Intertidal, sand (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Estuarine Intertidal, open sandy beaches
Intertidal, sand (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Estuarine Intertidal, sandy low marshes
Intertidal, sand (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Estuarine Intertidal, mixed-fine beaches and low marshes
Intertidal, sand (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Marine Intertidal, protected mud flats
Intertidal, mud (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
Estuarine Intertidal, mud flats
Intertidal, mud (presence of vegetation will be determined at the time of the spill)
all Marine and Estuarine Subtidal categories except open water
Subtidal
Marine Subtidal, open water
Pelagic
Estuarine Subtidal, open water
Pelagic
(3) For each oil spill where the compensation schedule is applied, the RDA committee shall determine the following:
(a) For spills greater than 1,000 gallons, the salmon vulnerability habitat(s) exposed to spilled oil and each habitat's percent-coverage of the total area exposed to spilled oil;
(b) For spills of less than 1,000 gallons, the salmon vulnerability habitat(s) in the subregion(s) exposed to spilled oil and the percent-coverage of these habitats in the exposed subregion(s);
(c) The season in which spill impacts will be greatest;
(d) The individual species/year class vulnerability score (SAVSi) as described in subsection (4) of this section; and
(e) The composite salmon vulnerability score for a spill (SAVSs) as described in subsection (5) of this section.
(4) From the information enumerated in subsection (2) of this section, the RDA committee shall determine the species/year class vulnerability score for a spill (SAVSi) by summing the weighted species/year class vulnerability scores for each of the salmon vulnerability habitats classified in Table 8 of subsection (2) of this section, where weighting is defined as percent-coverage of the salmon vulnerability habitats as determined in subsection (3) of this section, as follows:
SAVSi = (savs1* PCT-COV1) +
(savs2* PCT-COV2) + …+ (savsn* PCT-COVn)
where
SAVSi = salmon vulnerability score for a species/year class;
savsj = species/year class habitat vulnerability score for the season of greatest spill impact from subsection (2) of this section;
PCT-COVj = percent-coverage of habitat j from subsection (2) of this section;
i = Chinook, subyearling (Cs); Chinook, yearling (Cy); Coho (C); Pink (P); Chum (Ch); and Sockeye (So); and
n = the number of salmon vulnerabililty habitats used to calculate SAVS as determined in subsection (3) of this section.
(5) The raw salmon vulnerability score for a spill (SAVSs) shall be calculated as follows:
(a) In years when pink salmon are present in state waters. The chinook salmon spill vulnerability scores for subyearlings (SAVSCs) and yearlings (SAVSCy) as determined in subsection (4) of this section shall be averaged, then added to the spill vulnerability scores for coho (SAVSC), pink (SAVSP), chum (SAVSCh) and sockeye (SAVSSo) salmon as determined in subsection (4) of this section. The sum of these scores shall then be divided by 5, as described by the following formula:
SAVSs = [(SAVSCs + SAVSCy)/2 + SAVSC + SAVSP + SAVSCh + SAVSSo]/5
where
SAVSs = salmon vulnerability score for a spill;
SAVSCs = chinook, subyearling vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSCy = chinook (yearling) vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSC = coho salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSP = pink salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSC = chum salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSSo = sockeye salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
(b) In years when pink salmon are not present in state waters. The chinook salmon spill vulnerability scores for subyearlings (SAVSCs) and yearlings (SAVSCy) as determined in subsection (4) of this section shall be averaged, then added to the spill vulnerability scores for coho (SAVSC), chum (SAVSCh) and sockeye (SAVSSo) salmon as determined in subsection (4) of this section. The sum of these scores shall then be divided by 4, as described by the following formula:
SAVSs = [(SAVSCs + SAVSCy)/2 + SAVSC +
SAVSCh + SAVSSo]/4
where
SAVSs = salmon vulnerability score for a spill;
SAVSCs = chinook, subyearling vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSCy = chinook (yearling) vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSC = coho salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSP = pink salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSC = chum salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
SAVSSo = sockeye salmon vulnerability score from subsection (4) of this section;
(6) If spilled oil enters a river mouth, SAVSi from subsection (4) of this section shall be assigned a score of 5 for each species/year class in peak occurrence in a river mouth during the period of time the spilled oil enters and remains in the river mouth. Scores of 5 determined for species/year classes under this subsection shall supersede SAVSi scores calculated under subsection (4) of this section. The RDA committee shall make determinations of whether oil enters a river mouth and whether species/year classes are in peak occurrence when spilled oil is present in a river mouth.
(7) The final SAVSs score is found by rounding the raw SAVSs score calculated in subsection (5) of this section to the nearest 0.01 as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up.
(8) The final salmon vulnerability score for a spill shall be multiplied by 1.5 when any number of individuals of state or federal threatened or endangered salmon races and/or runs are exposed to spilled oil.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 and 92-13-083 (Order 91-13 and 91-13A), § 173-183-450, filed 4/23/92 and 6/16/92, effective 5/24/92 and 7/17/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-460

Marine mammal vulnerability.

(1) Each of the marine and estuarine subregions of state waters designated in WAC 173-183-400(2) is relatively ranked and scored for marine mammal vulnerability to oil spills on a 1 to 5 scale for each season where 5 represents the greatest vulnerability and 1 represents the least vulnerability.
(2) Marine mammal vulnerability ranking scores take into consideration species presence, diversity, population status, breeding vulnerability, presence of young, physiological vulnerability, primary habitat, feeding habitats and abundance.
(3) Marine mammal seasonal vulnerability scores for each of the marine and estuarine subregions of state waters are based on existing information and determinations made by the marine mammals subcommittee of the scientific advisory board. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, marine mammal vulnerability ranking scores for subregions classified in WAC 173-183-400(2) are as follows:
Table 9. Marine Mammal Vulnerability Scores (MVS)
 
SEASON
SUBREGION
SP
SU
FA
WI
101
NORTHERN OUTER COAST
5
5
5
5
102
KALALOCH
5
5
5
5
103
QUINAULT
5
5
5
5
104
COPALIS BEACH
5
5
5
4
105
GRAYS HARBOR
5
4
5
4
106
TWIN HARBORS BEACH
5
5
5
4
107
WILLAPA BAY
5
5
5
4
108
LONG BEACH
5
5
5
5
109
INNER SHELF
5
5
5
5
110
OUTER SHELF
4
2
3
3
111
SHELF EDGE
4
1
3
3
112
CONTINENTAL SLOPE
1
1
1
1
201
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-OUTER
4
4
3
2
203
CAPE FLATTERY
4
4
3
2
204
NEAH BAY
4
4
3
2
205
NEAH BAY TO CLALLAM BAY
3
3
2
2
206
CLALLAM BAY
3
3
2
2
207
CLALLAM BAY TO CRESCENT BAY
3
3
2
2
208
CRESCENT BAY
3
3
2
2
209
CRESCENT BAY TO EDIZ HOOK
3
3
2
2
301
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-INNER
4
4
4
3
302
EDIZ HOOK
4
4
4
3
303
PORT ANGELES
4
4
4
3
304
VOICE OF AMERICA
4
4
4
3
305
DUNGENESS SPIT
4
4
4
3
306
DUNGENESS BAY/HARBOR
4
4
4
3
307
JAMESTOWN
4
4
4
3
308
SEQUIM BAY
4
4
4
3
309
MILLER PENINSULA
4
4
4
3
310
PROTECTION ISLAND
4
4
4
3
311
DISCOVERY BAY
4
4
4
3
312
QUIMPER PENNSULA
4
4
4
3
313
WHIDBEY ISLAND
4
4
4
3
314
SMITH ISLAND
4
4
4
3
315
DECEPTION PASS
4
4
4
3
316
LOPEZ ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
4
4
4
3
317
SAN JUAN ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
4
4
4
3
401
ADMIRALTY INLET
4
4
4
3
402
SOUTH ADMIRALTY INLET
4
4
4
3
403
PORT TOWNSEND
4
4
4
3
404
OAK BAY
4
4
4
3
405
KILISUT HARBOR
4
4
4
3
501
BELLINGHAM CHANNEL
2
3
2
2
502
GUEMES CHANNEL
2
3
2
2
503
FIDALGO BAY
2
3
2
2
504
PADILLA BAY
2
3
2
2
505
SAMISH BAY
2
3
2
2
506
BELLINGHAM BAY
2
3
2
2
507
HALE PASSAGE
2
3
2
2
601
LUMMI BAY
4
4
4
3
602
CHERRY POINT
4
4
4
3
603
BURCH BAY
4
4
4
3
604
SEMIAHOO SPIT
4
4
4
3
605
DRAYTON HARBOR
4
4
4
3
607
SAN JUAN ISLANDS-NORTHERN TIER
4
4
4
3
608
GEORGIA STRAIT-EASTERN
4
4
4
3
701
PT. ROBERTS
4
4
4
3
703
GEORGIA STRAIT-WESTERN
4
4
4
3
801
NORTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
4
4
4
802
SOUTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
4
4
4
901
SOUTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
4
4
3
2
902
CENTRAL ROSARIO STRAIT
4
4
3
2
903
NORTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
5
4
3
2
1001
PRESIDENT CHANNEL
5
4
4
3
1002
NORTHERN AREAS
5
4
4
3
1101
SPEIDEN CHANNEL
3
3
3
2
1102
NORTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
3
3
3
2
1103
SOUTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
3
3
3
2
1104
WASP PASS
3
3
3
2
1105
UPRIGHT CHANNEL
3
3
3
2
1106
HARNEY CHANNEL
3
3
3
2
1107
OBSTRUCTION PASS
3
3
3
2
1108
THATCHER PASS
3
3
3
2
1201
MOSQUITO/ROCHE COMPLEX
3
3
3
2
1202
FRIDAY HARBOR
3
3
3
2
1203
GRIFFIN BAY
3
3
3
2
1205
FISHERMAN BAY
3
3
3
2
1206
SWIFTS/SHOAL BAYS
3
3
3
2
1207
DEER HARBOR
3
3
3
2
1208
WEST SOUND
3
3
3
2
1209
EAST SOUND
3
3
3
2
1210
LOPEZ SOUND
3
3
3
2
1401
SKAGIT BAY
2
1
1
1
1402
PENN COVE/CRESCENT HARBOR
2
1
1
1
1403
SARATOGA PASSAGE
2
1
1
2
1404
HOLMES HARBOR
2
1
1
1
1405
PORT SUSAN
2
1
1
1
1406
POSSESSION SOUND
2
1
1
2
1501
HOOD CANAL ENTRANCE
1
1
1
1
1502
PORT LUDLOW
1
1
1
1
1503
PORT GAMBLE
1
1
1
1
1504
NORTHERN HOOD CANAL
1
1
1
1
1505
CENTRAL HOOD CANAL
1
1
1
1
1506
DABOB BAY
1
1
1
1
1507
QUILCENE BAY
1
1
1
1
1508
SOUTHCENTRAL HOOD CANAL
1
1
1
1
1509
ANNAS BAY
1
1
1
1
1510
GREAT BEND
1
1
1
1
1601
N. PUGET SOUND
3
2
2
2
1602
N. CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
3
2
2
2
1603
CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
2
1
1
1
1604
ELLIOT BAY
2
1
1
1
1605
EAST PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1606
COLVOS PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1607
COMMENCEMENT BAY
2
1
1
1
1608
NARROWS
2
1
1
1
1609
STEILACOOM
2
1
1
1
1610
NISQUALLY
2
1
1
1
1611
TREBLE-JOHNSON
2
1
1
1
1612
HALE PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1613
CARR INLET
2
1
1
1
1614
PITT PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1615
DRAYTON HARBOR
2
1
1
1
1616
CASE INLET
2
1
1
1
1617
HENDERSON INLET
2
1
1
1
1618
DANA PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1619
BUDD INLET
2
1
1
1
1620
ELD INLET
2
1
1
1
1621
TOTTEN INLET
2
1
1
1
1622
PICKERING PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1623
PEALE PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1624
SQUAXIN
2
1
1
1
1625
SKOOKUM INLET
2
1
1
1
1626
HAMMERSLEY INLET
2
1
1
1
1627
OAKLAND BAY
2
1
1
1
1628
AGATE PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1629
LIBERTY BAY
2
1
1
1
1630
PORT ORCHARD
2
1
1
1
1631
SINCLAIR INLET
2
1
1
1
1632
DYES INLET
2
1
1
1
1633
RICH PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1634
QUARTERMASTER HARBOR
2
1
1
1
1635
DALCO PASSAGE
2
1
1
1
1636
BALCH PASS
2
1
1
1
(4) The marine mammal vulnerability score for a spill shall be multiplied by 1.5 when any number of state or federal threatened or endangered marine mammal species are exposed to spilled oil.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-460, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-470

Marine and estuarine recreation vulnerability.

(1) Each of the marine and estuarine subregions of state waters designated in WAC 173-183-400(2) are relatively ranked and scored for recreation vulnerability on a 1 to 5 scale for each season where a score of 5 represents the greatest vulnerability and a score of 1 represents the least vulnerability.
(2) Recreation vulnerability ranking scores take into consideration seasonal level of participation in recreational activities, number of recreation sites and types of recreational amenities available in a subregion.
(3) Recreation vulnerability ranking scores for each of the marine and estuarine subregions of state waters in each season has been determined from existing information and recommendations of the recreation subcommittee of the scientific advisory board. For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, recreation vulnerability ranking scores (RVS) for the subregions designated in WAC 173-183-400(2) are as follows:
Table 10. Marine and Estuarine Recreation Vulnerability Scores (RVS)
 
SEASON
SUBREGION
SP
SU
FA
WI
101
NORTHERN OUTER COAST
5
5
5
5
102
KALALOCH
5
5
5
5
103
QUINAULT
1
1
1
1
104
COPALIS BEACH
5
5
5
5
105
GRAYS HARBOR
4
4
4
3
106
TWIN HARBORS BEACH
5
5
5
5
107
WILIAPA BAY
5
5
5
5
108
LONG BEACH
5
5
5
5
109
INNER SHELF
1
1
1
1
110
OUTER SHELF
1
1
1
1
111
SHELF EDGE
1
1
1
1
112
CONTINENTAL SLOPE
1
1
1
1
201
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-OUTER
1
1
1
1
203
CAPE FLATTERY
1
1
1
1
204
NEAH BAY
1
1
1
1
205
NEAH BAY TO CLALLAM BAY
5
5
5
4
206
CLALLAM BAY
3
4
3
2
207
CLALLAM BAY TO CRESCENT BAY
5
5
5
4
208
CRESCENT BAY
3
4
3
3
209
CRESCENT BAY TO EDIZ HOOK
4
5
4
3
301
STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-INNER
1
1
1
1
302
EDIZ HOOK
3
4
3
3
303
PORT ANGELES
5
5
5
4
304
VOICE OF AMERICA
2
3
2
2
305
DUNGENESS SPIT
1
1
1
1
306
DUNGENESS BAY/HARBOR
5
5
5
4
307
JAMESTOWN
2
3
2
2
308
SEQUIM BAY
4
5
4
4
309
MILLER PENINSULA
2
3
2
2
310
PROTECTION ISLAND
1
1
1
1
311
DISCOVERY BAY
2
2
2
2
312
QUIMPER PENNSULA
3
3
2
2
313
WHIDBEY ISLAND
2
3
2
2
314
SMITH ISLAND
1
1
1
1
315
DECEPTION PASS
5
5
5
5
316
LOPEZ ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
4
5
4
3
317
SAN JUAN ISLAND (SOUTH SHORE)
4
5
4
3
401
ADMIRALTY INLET
5
5
5
4
402
SOUTH ADMIRALTY INLET
5
5
5
4
403
PORT TOWNSEND
3
4
3
3
404
OAK BAY
4
5
4
3
405
KILISUT HARBOR
2
2
2
2
501
BELLINGHAM CHANNEL
5
5
5
4
502
GUEMES CHANNEL
1
1
1
1
503
FIDALGO BAY
4
4
3
3
504
PADILLA BAY
5
5
5
4
505
SAMISH BAY
4
4
3
3
506
BELLINGHAM BAY
5
5
5
4
507
HALE PASSAGE
3
4
3
2
601
LUMMI BAY
1
1
1
1
602
CHERRY POINT
1
1
1
1
603
BURCH BAY
3
4
3
3
604
SEMIAHOO SPIT
3
4
3
3
605
DRAYTON HARBOR
2
2
2
2
607
SAN JUAN ISLANDS-NORTHERN TIER
5
5
5
5
608
GEORGIA STRAIT-EASTERN
1
1
1
1
701
PT. ROBERTS
3
3
3
2
703
GEORGIA STRAIT-WESTERN
1
1
1
1
801
NORTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
5
5
4
802
SOUTHERN HARO STRAIT
5
5
5
4
901
SOUTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
5
5
5
5
902
CENTRAL ROSARIO STRAIT
4
5
4
4
903
NORTHERN ROSARIO STRAIT
4
4
4
3
1001
PRESIDENT CHANNEL
4
5
4
4
1002
NORTHERN AREAS
4
5
4
3
1101
SPEIDEN CHANNEL
3
4
3
2
1102
NORTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
4
5
4
3
1103
SOUTHERN SAN JUAN CHANNEL
5
5
5
4
1104
WASP PASS
5
5
5
4
1105
UPRIGHT CHANNEL
5
5
4
4
1106
HARNEY CHANNEL
4
5
4
3
1107
OBSTRUCTION PASS
2
2
2
2
1108
THATCHER PASS
4
5
4
3
1201
MOSQUITO/ROCHE COMPLEX
3
4
3
3
1202
FRIDAY HARBOR
3
3
3
2
1203
GRIFFIN BAY
4
5
4
4
1205
FISHERMAN BAY
1
1
1
1
1206
SWIFT/SHOAL BAYS
1
1
1
1
1207
DEER HARBOR
2
2
2
2
1208
WEST SOUND
3
4
3
2
1209
EAST SOUND
4
5
4
4
1210
LOPEZ SOUND
5
5
5
4
1401
SKAGIT BAY
5
5
5
5
1402
PENN COVE/CRESCENT HARBOR
4
4
3
3
1403
SARATOGA PASSAGE
3
4
3
3
1404
HOLMES HARBOR
2
3
2
2
1405
PORT SUSAN
3
4
3
3
1406
POSSESSION SOUND
4
5
4
3
1501
HOOD CANAL ENTRANCE
4
5
4
3
1502
PORT LUDLOW
4
4
4
3
1503
PORT GAMBLE
1
1
1
1
1504
NORTHERN HOOD CANAL
1
1
1
1
1505
CENTRAL HOOD CANAL
4
4
3
3
1506
DABOB BAY
4
5
4
3
1507
QUILCENE BAY
3
3
2
2
1508
SOUTHCENTRAL HOOD CANAL
4
5
4
3
1509
ANNAS BAY
4
4
4
3
1510
GREAT BEND
3
4
3
3
1601
N. PUGET SOUND
4
4
3
3
1602
N. CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
4
5
4
4
1603
CENTRAL PUGET SOUND
5
5
4
4
1604
ELLIOT BAY
4
5
4
3
1605
EAST PASSAGE
4
5
4
3
1606
COLVOS PASSAGE
3
3
2
2
1607
COMMENCEMENT BAY
2
2
2
2
1608
NARROWS
3
3
3
2
1609
STEILACOOM
3
3
3
2
1610
NISQUALLY
5
5
5
4
1611
TREBLE-JOHNSON
3
3
2
2
1612
HALE PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1613
CARR INLET
4
5
4
4
1614
PITT PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1615
DRAYTON HARBOR
2
2
2
2
1616
CASE INLET
4
4
3
3
1617
HENDERSON INLET
2
2
2
1
1618
DANA PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1619
BUDD INLET
3
4
3
3
1620
ELD INLET
2
3
2
2
1621
TOTTEN INLET
1
1
1
1
1622
PICKERING PASSAGE
3
4
3
2
1623
PEALE PASSAGE
3
3
3
2
1624
SQUAXIN
2
2
2
1
1625
SKOOKUM INLET
1
1
1
1
1626
HAMMERSLEY INLET
2
2
2
2
1627
OAKLAND BAY
2
2
1
1
1628
AGATE PASSAGE
2
2
2
2
1629
LIBERTY BAY
2
3
2
2
1630
PORT ORCHARD
3
3
3
2
1631
SINCLAIR INLET
2
3
2
2
1632
DYES INLET
3
3
2
2
1633
RICH PASSAGE
3
4
3
3
1634
QUARTERMASTER HARBOR
2
3
2
2
1635
DALCO PASSAGE
4
5
4
3
1636
BALCH PASS
1
1
1
1
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-470, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-500

Vulnerability of the Columbia River estuary environment to oil spills.

(1) The purpose of this section is to describe the method of ranking vulnerability of the Columbia River estuary environment to oil spills for purposes of assessing damages using the compensation schedule.
(2) The Columbia River estuary has been distinguished from other estuarine waters of the state because it resides within the jurisdiction of two states, Washington and Oregon.
(3) For purposes of RCW 90.48.366, estuarine waters of the Columbia River are divided into one kilometer square cells. Bird, fish, mammal, invertebrate, habitat, and human use resource sensitivity have been evaluated for each cell by season. Seasonal resource sensitivities are ranked for each cell on a 1 to 5 scale where 5 represents the greatest sensitivity and 1 represents the least sensitivity as designated on the maps attached as Appendix 6 of this chapter.
(4) A vulnerability score (VS) shall be calculated at the time of a spill for each cell and for the most sensitive season impacted by the spill. The VS rates the vulnerability of public resources to the spilled oil.
(a) VS for a particular cell is determined by summing the sensitivity scores assigned to each cell for bird, fish, mammal, invertebrate, habitat, and human use resources as follows:
 
 
VSij = BSSij + FSSij + MSSij + ISSij + HSSij + HUSij
where
VSij = spill vulnerability score for a particular call and season
 
 
BSS = bird sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
FSS = fish sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
MSS = mammal sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
ISS = invertebrate sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
HSS = habitat sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
HUS = human use sensitivity score (from Appendix 6 of this chapter)
 
 
i = the cell under consideration
 
 
j = the most sensitive season impacted; fall, winter, spring, or summer
(b) The raw vulnerability score for a spill (SVS) is determined by calculating the average of the vulnerability scores for the cells exposed to the spill as follows:
 
 
SVSj = (VS1+ VS2+ ...+ VSx)/x
where
VSi = vulnerability score for cell i (from subsection (4)(a) of this section),
 
 
x = number of cells exposed to the spill, and
(5) The final SVS score is found by rounding the raw SVS score calculated from the formula in subsection (4) of this section to the nearest 0.01 as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-500, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-600

Vulnerability of freshwater stream, river, and lake environments to oil spills.

(1) The purpose of this section is to describe the method of ranking the vulnerability of state freshwater stream, river, and lake environments, and portions thereof, to oil spills for purposes of applying the compensation schedule.
(2) Vulnerability of freshwater stream, river, and lake environments to oil spills is based on water type classifications and a habitat index.
(3) For each oil spill into a freshwater stream, river, or lake, a spill vulnerability score (SVS) is calculated. The SVS rates the vulnerability of public resources to spilled oil based on the spilled oil's propensity to cause acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and to persist in the environment. SVS is determined by multiplying the freshwater vulnerability score, which is based on the water type classification, by the habitat index score as described by the following formula:
Raw Spill Vulnerability Score (SVS) = FVS* HI.
where
FVS = Freshwater vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-610), and
 
HI = Habitat index (from WAC 173-183-620).
(4) The final SVS score is found by rounding the raw SVS score calculated from the formula in subsection (3) of this section to the nearest 0.01 as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-600, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-610

Freshwater vulnerability index.

(1) For purposes of this chapter, freshwater streams, rivers, lakes, and portions thereof, are classified into 5 water types based on the identification system set forth in WAC 222-16-030 which is incorporated by reference.
(a) "Type 1 Water" means all waters, within their ordinary high-water mark, as inventoried as "shorelines of the state" under chapter 90.58 RCW.
(b) "Type 2 Water" shall mean segments of natural waters which are not classified as Type 1 Water and have a high use and are important from a water quality standpoint for:
(i) Domestic water supplies;
(ii) Public recreation;
(iii) Fish spawning, rearing, or migration or wildlife uses; or
(iv) Are highly significant to protect water quality.
(c) "Type 3 Water" shall mean segments of natural waters which are not classified as Type 1 or 2 Water and have a moderate to slight use and are moderately important from a water quality standpoint for:
(i) Domestic water supplies;
(ii) Public recreation;
(iii) Fish spawning, rearing, or migration or wildlife uses; or
(iv) Are highly significant to protect water quality.
(d) "Type 4 Water" shall mean segments of natural waters which are not classified as Type 1, 2, or 3. Their significance lies in their influence of water quality downstream in Type 1, 2, or 3 Waters. These may be perennial or intermittent.
(e) "Type 5 Water" means all other waters, in natural water courses, including streams with or without a well-defined channel, areas of perennial or intermittent seepage, ponds, and natural sinks. Drainage ways having short periods of runoff are considered to be Type 5 Waters.
(3) The vulnerability of freshwater environments is based on the stream typing system established in WAC 222-16-030 incorporated by reference. The rating of biological and recreational resources ranges from 1 to 5 where 5 represents the most sensitive category and 1 represents the least sensitive category as follows:
TABLE 11.
Freshwater Vulnerability Score (FVS).
fvs
 
qualification
5
 
"Type 1 waters"
4
 
"Type 2 waters"
3
 
"Type 3 waters"
2
 
"Type 4 waters"
1
 
"Type 5 waters"
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-610, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-620

Habitat index.

(1) Most state freshwaters vary to some degree from the natural condition as increased activities within individual watersheds have decreased stream, river, and/or lake habitat quality. In order to account for that degradation prior to assessing damages using the compensation schedule, a habitat index (HI) is calculated to represent existing stream conditions prior to the oil spill.
(2) For each stream, river, or lake impacted by an oil spill where the preassessment screening committee determines that the compensation schedule shall be used, a habitat index (HI) shall be calculated following an oil spill using the following methodology. The HI measures the amount of stream degradation from natural conditions and shall be calculated using the following formula:
Habitat Index (HI) = [(P1+P2+P3+P4+P5+P6)÷Np] x f1 x f2 x f3
where:
P1 = barriers to natural fish movement
 
P2 = urbanization
 
P3 = condition of riparian vegetation
 
P4 = condition of flood plain
 
P5 = land use of watershed
 
P6 = flow alteration
 
Np = number of P parameters used to calculate HI
 
f1 = channel modifications
 
f2 = impoundment
 
f3 = water quality
(3) The RDA committee shall determine which of the habitat quality parameters described in subsection (2) of this section are applicable to the particular spill under consideration. If a parameter is not applicable to the spill under consideration, the parameter shall not be included in the formula provided in subsection (2) of this section.
(4) Habitat quality parameters (P).
(a) Barriers to natural fish movement (P1). Barriers, to some degree, limit the free passage of fish upstream thus limiting the ability of streams to recover. The scoring of this parameter is based on the influence of barriers in the natural dispersal of fish populations as follows:
Table 12. Scoring of Barriers to Natural Fish Movement (P1).
rating qualification
10
No manmade obstructions to free upstream passage of fish
8
No dams or other structures causing a vertical drop of more than 1 foot during low flow
5
No dams or other structures causing a vertical drop of more than 3 foot during low flow
3
No dams or other structures causing a vertical drop of more than 10 foot during low flow
0
One to several dams or other structures each causing a drop of more than 10 feet during low flow
(b) Urbanization (P2). Urban development has historically had negative habitat effects on freshwater ecosystems. The percent of urban development in a watershed directly influences siltation, riparian abuse, and water quality deterioration. The scoring of this parameter is based on the percent of urbanization in the stream watershed.
Table 13. Scoring of Urbanization (P2).
rating qualification
10
Less than 5 percent of the watershed in urban development
8
Five to 10 percent of the watershed in urban development
5
Ten to 40 percent of the watershed in urban development
3
Forty to 70 percent of the watershed in urban development
0
Seventy to 100 percent of the watershed in urban development
(c) Condition of riparian vegetation (P3). Riparian vegetation is important to seventy percent of the animal and bird species in Washington for some part of their life cycle. It also exerts thermal regulatory and thermal controls for the aquatic system. The scoring of this parameter is based on the percent of banks that are protected by effective riparian vegetation.
Table 14. Scoring of Condition of Riparian Vegetation (P3).
rating qualification
10
Ninety to 100 percent of the banks are protected by appropriate perennial vegetation
8
Sixty to 90 percent of the banks are protected by appropriate perennial vegetation
5
Forty to 60 percent of the banks are protected by appropriate perennial vegetation
3
Ten to 40 percent of the banks are protected by appropriate perennial vegetation
0
Zero to 10 percent of the banks are protected by appropriate perennial vegetation
(d) Condition of the flood plain (P4). The condition of the flood plain forecasts the amount of sedimentation and erosion in the watershed and as such is a primary predictor of stream degradation. The rating of this parameter is as follows:
Table 15. Scoring of the Condition of the Flood Plain (P4).
rating qualification
10
Little or no evidence of active or recent erosion of the flood plain during floods
5
All segments show evidence of occasional erosion of the flood plain. Stream channel essentially intact
0
Flood plain severely eroded and degraded, stream channel poorly defined with much lateral erosion and much reduced flow capacity
(e) Land use of the watershed (P5). Land use practices exert a great deal of influence on the quality of the aquatic habitat. The rating of this parameter is as follows:
Table 16. Scoring of Land Use of the Watershed (P5).
rating qualification
10
More than 80 percent of the watershed protected by timber, improved pasture, terraces, or other conservation practices
8
Sixty to 80 percent of the watershed protected by timber, improved pasture, terraces, or other conservation practices
5
Forty to 60 percent of the watershed protected by timber, improved pasture, terraces, or other conservation practices
3
Twenty to 40 percent of the watershed protected by timber, improved pasture, terraces, or other conservation practices
1
Zero to 20 percent of the watershed protected by timber, improved pasture, terraces, or other conservation practices
(f) Flow alteration (P6). Alteration of the natural flow regime can frequently alter habitat conditions that are necessary for certain behavioral and ecological needs of species. The rating of this parameter is as follows:
Table 17. Scoring for Flow Alteration (P6).
rating qualification
10
Less than 1 percent of the watershed controlled by impoundments and/or less than 50 percent of the watershed controlled by farm ponds
8
One to 30 percent of the watershed controlled by impoundments and/or less than 50 percent of the watershed controlled by farm ponds
5
Thirty to 60 percent of the watershed controlled by impoundments and/or less than 50 percent of the watershed controlled by farm ponds
3
Sixty to 95 percent of the watershed controlled by impoundments and/or less than 50 percent of the watershed controlled by farm ponds
0
Ninety-five to 100 percent of the watershed controlled by impoundments and/or less than 50 percent of the watershed controlled by farm ponds
(5) Habitat alteration functions (F). Each habitat alteration function has the power to reduce the habitat quality rating, dependent on the type and extent of alteration. Functions are expressed on a scale of 0 to 1.0.
(a) Channel modification (F1). Channel modification can have a dramatic effect of the ability of a stream to provide for a diversity of habitats. This parameter is rated as follows:
 
 
Channel Modification (F1) = 1.0 - (SM*FR)
where
F1 = Channel modification rate
 
 
SM = Percent stream reach modified, expressed as a decimal
 
 
FR = Percent fish reduction, expressed as a decimal
Table 18. Scoring for Percent Fish Reduction (FR).
 
channel modification
% fish reduction
 
Clearing, Snagging
25
 
Channel realignment
80
 
Channel paving
95
(b) Water quality (F2). Water quality exerts a variety of detrimental and/or beneficial on the aquatic ecosystem. This parameter is rated as follows:
Table 19. Scoring for Water Quality (F2).
rating qualification
1.0
Stream water unpolluted. No pollutants detected by standard methods
0.8
Occasional above normal levels of one or more water pollutants usually present, but detectable only by analysis
0.5
Occasional visible signs of oversupply of nutrients or other pollutants detected by analysis
0.4
Occasional fish kills averaging about every 4 years or more
0.2
Occasional fish kills occurring more often than every 4 years
0.0
Grossly polluted waters with fish kills occurring annually or more frequently
(c) Streambed condition (F3). The condition of the substrate habitat can be altered in such a way as to reduce the effective habitat available to the aquatic community as a whole. This parameter is ranked as follows:
Table 20. Scoring of Streambed Condition.
rating qualification
1.0
No apparent unstable material in channel with substrate of bedrock, boulders, rubble, gravel or firm alluvium
0.9
Traces of unstabilized silt, sand, or gravel in quiet areas or large pools with firm substrate
0.8
Quiet areas covered with unstable materials, deep pools restricted to areas of greatest scour
0.7
Pools shallow, filled with silt, sand or gravel, riffles contain noticeable silt deposits
0.5
Streambed completely covered by varying thicknesses of transported material such as silt, sand and gravel
0.0
Stream channel nearly or completely filled with unconsolidated, transported material; no surface flow except during floods
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-620, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-700

Vulnerability of freshwater wetland environments to oil spills.

(1) The purpose of this section is to describe the method of ranking the vulnerability of freshwater wetland environments to oil spills for purposes of assessing damages by applying the compensation schedule.
(2) Vulnerability of freshwater wetland environments to oil spills is based on a wetlands classification which rates the vulnerability of a wetland to spilled oil. Wetland environments are classified into five categories which represent the sensitivity of habitat, plants, animals, and recreational use to oil spills. For purposes of this chapter, the wetlands vulnerability score shall be equal to the spill vulnerability score as follows:
 
Spill Vulnerability Score (SVS) = WVS
where
WVS = wetlands vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-710).
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-700, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-710

Wetlands vulnerability classification.

(1) Freshwater wetland environments and portions thereof, are classified into 4 types based on the identification system set forth below.
(a) Category I wetlands. The following types of wetlands are classed as category I wetlands:
(i) Documented habitat for threatened or endangered plant, animal, or fish species recognized by federal or state agencies; or
(ii) Documented Natural Heritage wetland sites or high quality native wetland communities which qualify as Natural Heritage wetland sites; or
(iii) Documented habitat of regional (Pacific Coast) or national significance for migratory birds; or
(iv) Regionally rare wetland communities; or
(v) Wetlands with irreplaceable ecological functions; or
(vi) Documented wetlands of local significance.
(b) Category II wetlands. The following types of wetlands are classed as category II wetlands:
(i) Documented habitat recognized by federal and state agencies for sensitive plant, animal, or fish species; or
(ii) Documented priority habitats and species recognized by state agencies; or
(iii) Wetlands with significant functions which may not be adequately replicated through creation or restoration; or
(iv) Wetlands with significant habitat value; or
(v) Documented wetlands of local significance.
(c) Category III wetlands. The following types of wetlands are classed as category III when they satisfy no category I, II, or IV criteria.
(d) Category IV wetlands. The following types of wetlands are classed as category IV wetlands:
(i) Wetlands less than one acre in size and hydrologically isolated and comprised of one vegetated class that is dominated (more than eighty percent areal cover) by one species from the list in Table 21; or
(ii) Wetlands less than two acres and hydrologically isolated with one vegetative class and more than ninety percent of the areal cover is any combination of species from the list in Table 22.
Table 21. List of invasive/exotic plant species for rating Category IV wetlands.
Common name
Scientific name
Soft Rush
Juncus effusus
Reed
Phragmites communis
Buttercup
Ranunculus repens
Reed Canary Grass
Phalaris arundinaceae
Purple loosestrife
Lythrum salicarla
Townsend's cordgrass
Spartina townsendii
Nonnative blackberry
Rubus discolor, laciniatus, vestitus, macrophyllus
Velvet grass
Holyus lanarus, mollis
Fescue
Festuca arundinaceae, pratensis
Quackgrass
Agropyron repena
Meadow foxtail
Alopercurus pratensis, aequalis
Orchardgrass
Dactylis glomerata
Ryegrass
Loliom parenne, multiflorum, temulentum
Timothy
Phleum pratense
Bluegrass
Poa compressa, palustris, pratensia
Bromes
Bromus tectorum, rigidus, brizaformis, geoalinus, japonicus, mollis, commutatus, inarmis, cractus
Sandbur
Cauchrus longispinus
Crab Grass
Digitarisa sanguinalis
Barnyard grass
Echinochloa crusgalli
Green Bristlegrass
Setaria viridius
Foxtail Barley
Hordeum jubatum
Dogtail
Cynosurus cristatus, achinatus
Russian Thistle
Salsola kali
Knotweeds
Polygonium aviculare, concoloculus, cuspidatum, lapathifolium, persicaria
Tumblemustards
Sisymbrium altissimum, loesclii, officinale
Scotch broom
Cytisus scoparius
Sweet clover
Melilotus alba, officinalis
Bird's foot trefoil
Lotus corniculatus
Alfalfa
Medicago sativa
Clover
Trifolium dubium, pratense, repens, aryense, subterraneum, hybridum
Spurge
Euphorbia pepius, caula
St. John's wort
Hyparicum parfoliatum
Teasel
Dipsacus sylvestris
Pineapple weed
Marricaria matricartioides
Tansy
Tanacetum vulgare
Thistles
Cirsium vulgare, arvense
Burdock
Arctium minus
Knapweeds
Centauras solstitialis, repens, cyanus, maculosa
Cultivated species; wheat,
corn, barley, triticum, rye
 
Table 22. List of native species for rating of Category IV wetlands.
Common name
Scientific name
Hard hack
Spirea douglasii
Cattail
Typha latifolia
Soft rush
Juncus effusus
(2) Freshwater wetland environment vulnerability score (WVS). The vulnerability of freshwater wetland environments is based on the stream typing system established in WAC 222-16-030 incorporated by reference. The rating of the freshwater wetland environment vulnerability ranges from 1 to 5, where 5 represents the most sensitive category and 1 represents the least sensitive category as follows:
Table 23. Freshwater Wetlands Vulnerability Score (WVS).
wvs
 
qualification
5
 
Category I wetlands
4
 
Category II wetlands
3
 
Category III wetlands
1
 
Category IV wetlands
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-710, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-800

Calculation of damages using the compensation schedule general.

The purpose of WAC 173-183-800 to 173-183-850 are to describe:
(1) The responsibilities of the OSC and RDA committee chair in applying the compensation schedule; and
(2) The procedures for determining public resource damages using the compensation schedule.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-800, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-810

On-scene coordinator responsibilities.

(1) The OSC or designee shall make the following determinations:
(a) Quantity and type of oil spilled;
(b) Extent and location of the spill;
(c) Whether containment of spilled oil was effective within the times specified in WAC 173-183-870 (1)(c) and (d);
(d) Whether spilled oil contacted the shoreline within the times specified in WAC 173-183-870 (1)(c) and (d); and
(e) The amount of oil cleaned up on a daily basis, and in total.
(2) The RDA committee shall allow the potentially liable party an opportunity to submit further information on the determinations made by the OSC in subsection (1) of this section.
(3) The potentially liable party (PLP) may hire an independent expert to determine the volume of oil spilled and recovered, including the volume recovered within the first twenty-four hours for nonpersistent oil and forty-eight hours for persistent oil after spill initiation. The volume determinations made by the independent expert shall be used in calculations of damages under the compensation schedule if the independent expert selected is acceptable to both the PLP and the department. Determinations by the mutually agreed upon independent expert of the quantity of oil spilled and cleaned up shall be provided to the RDA committee chair within sixty days of the spill under consideration.
(4) The OSC shall provide the information enumerated in subsection (1) of this section to the RDA committee chair in a timely manner.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-810, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-810, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-820

RDA committee chair responsibilities.

(1) The RDA committee chair shall, in consultation with the OSC and RDA committee, determine the following:
(a) For spills into marine or estuarine environments excluding the Columbia River estuary:
(i) The acute toxicity, mechanical injury and persistence oil class rankings for the spilled oil as provided in WAC 173-183-340;
(ii) Subregion(s) exposed to the spilled oil;
(iii) Habitat types exposed to the spilled oil as classified in WAC 173-183-410 for spills of 1,000 gallons or more;
(iv) Percent coverage of each habitat type within the area of spill exposure for spills of 1,000 gallons or more;
(v) Percent coverage of habitat types present within the subregion(s) exposed to spilled oil for spills of less than 1,000 gallons.
(vi) A spill's habitat vulnerability scores (HVS) for acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence as determined by the procedures outlined in WAC 173-183-400; and
(vii) The spill vulnerability scores (SVSAT, SVSMI, SVSPER) for the most vulnerable season affected by the spill using the formula provided in WAC 173-183-400.
(b) For spills in the estuarine waters of the Columbia River:
(i) The acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence oil class rankings for the spilled oil as provided in WAC 173-183-340;
(ii) The cell(s) exposed to the spilled oil; and
(iii) The spill vulnerability score (SVS) for the most vulnerable season affected by the spilled oil using the procedures provided in WAC 173-183-500.
(c) For spills in freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes:
(i) The acute toxicity, mechanical injury and persistence oil class rankings for the spilled oil as provided in WAC 173-183-340;
(ii) Freshwater vulnerability score as described in WAC 173-183-610;
(iii) Freshwater habitat index as described in WAC 173-183-620; and
(iv) Spill vulnerability score (SVS) as outlined in WAC 173-183-600 for each stream, river, and/or lake environment exposed to the spill; and
(d) For spills in freshwater wetlands:
(i) The acute toxicity, mechanical injury, and persistence oil class rankings for the spilled oil as provided in WAC 173-183-340;
(ii) Freshwater wetland vulnerability score as described in WAC 173-183-710;
(iii) Spill vulnerability score (SVS) as outlined in WAC 173-183-700 for each wetland exposed to the spill.
(2) For spills that enter more than one environment, the RDA committee chair shall, in consultation with the OSC and RDA committee, make the determinations enumerated under subsection (1)(a) through (d) of this section.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 03-11-010 (Order 03-03), § 173-183-820, filed 5/12/03, effective 6/12/03; WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-820, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-830

Calculation of damages for spills into marine and estuarine waters, except the Columbia River estuary.

(1) The formula provided in subsection (2) of this section shall be used to determine damages liability for spills into marine and estuarine waters, except the estuarine waters of Columbia River. The value of the variables used in the formula shall be determined by:
(a) The OSC as enumerated in WAC 173-183-810(1);
(b) The mutually agreed upon independent expert, if applicable, as described in WAC 173-183-810(2); and
(c) The RDA committee chair as enumerated in WAC 173-183-820 (1)(a).
(2) In making the determination of percent-coverage of habitat types, the RDA committee chair may assume that the habitat-type visible at low tide extends out to the 20 meter depth contour.
(3) Damages liability shall be calculated using the following formula:
Damages ($) =
 
 
x * [(OILAT *SVSATj *total gallons spilled) + (OILMI *SVSMIj *total gallons spilled) +
(OILPER *SVSPERj*total gallons spilled)]
where:
total gallons spilled = the number of gallons of oil spilled as determined by the procedures outlined in WAC 173-183-810;
 
 
SVSi,j = spill vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-400(3));
 
 
OILAT = Acute Toxicity Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340);
 
 
OILMI = Mechanical Injury Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340); and
 
 
OILPER = Persistence Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340).
 
 
i = acute toxicity, mechanical injury and persistence effect of oil
 
 
j = the most sensitive season affected by the spill
 
 
x = multiplier of 0.208 for spills less than 1000 gallons in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $1-100 per gallon range.
 
 
x = multiplier of 0.624 for spills of 1000 gallons or more in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $3-300 per gallon range.
Formula results shall be rounded to the nearest 0.01 to determine damages liability as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down, and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up. For spills less than one thousand gallons, when the formula results in damages less than one dollar per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of one dollar per gallon spilled. For spills of one thousand gallons or more in volume, when the formula results in damages less than three dollars per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of three dollars per gallon spilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-830, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13; WSR 09-07-029 (Order 08-14), § 173-183-830, filed 3/10/09, effective 4/10/09. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 03-11-010 (Order 03-03), § 173-183-830, filed 5/12/03, effective 6/12/03; WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-830, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-840

Calculation of damages for spills into the Columbia River estuary.

(1) The formula provided in subsection (2) of this section shall be used to determine damages liability for spills into the estuarine waters of Columbia River. The value of the variables used in the formula shall be determined by:
(a) The OSC as enumerated in WAC 173-183-810(1);
(b) The mutually agreed upon independent expert, if applicable, as described in WAC 173-183-810(2); and
(c) The RDA committee chair as enumerated in WAC 173-183-820 (1)(b).
(2) Damages liability shall be calculated using the following formula:
Damages ($) =
 
x * [(OILAT *SVSj *total gallons spilled) + (OILMI *SVSj *total gallons spilled) + (OILPER *SVSj *total gallons spilled)]
where:
total gallons spilled = the number of gallons of oil spilled as determined by procedures outlined in WAC 173-183-810;
 
SVSj = spill vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-500(5));
 
j = the most sensitive season affected by the spill
 
OILAT = Acute Toxicity Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340);
 
OILMI = Mechanical Injury Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340); and
 
OILPER = Persistence Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340).
 
x = multiplier of 0.508 for spills less than 1000 gallons in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $1-100 per gallon range.
 
x = multiplier of 1.524 for spills of 1000 gallons or more in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $3-300 per gallon range.
Formula results shall be rounded to the nearest 0.01 to determine damages liability as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down, and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up. For spills less than one thousand gallons, when the formula results in damages less than one dollar per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of one dollar per gallon spilled. For spills of one thousand gallons or more in volume, when the formula results in damages less than three dollars per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of three dollars per gallon spilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-840, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13; WSR 09-07-029 (Order 08-14), § 173-183-840, filed 3/10/09, effective 4/10/09. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-840, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-850

Calculation of damages for spills in freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes.

(1) The formula provided in subsection (2) of this section shall be used to determine damages liability for spills into freshwater streams, rivers, and lakes. The value of the variables used in the formula shall be determined by:
(a) The OSC as enumerated in WAC 173-183-810(1);
(b) The mutually agreed upon independent expert, if applicable, as described in WAC 173-183-810(2); and
(c) The RDA committee chair as enumerated in WAC 173-183-820 (1)(c).
(2) Damages liability shall be calculated using the following formula:
Damages ($) =
 
x * [(OILAT *SVS *total gallons spilled) + (OILMI *SVS *total gallons spilled) + (OILPER *SVS *total gallons spilled)]
where:
total gallons spilled = the number of gallons of oil spilled as determined by the procedures outlined in WAC 173-183-810;
 
 
SVS = Spill vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-600(3));
 
 
OILAT = Acute Toxicity Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340);
 
 
OILMI = Mechanical Injury Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340); and
 
 
OILPER = Persistence Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340).
 
 
x = multiplier of 0.162 for spills less than 1000 gallons in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $1-100 per gallon range.
 
 
x = multiplier of 0.486 for spills of 1000 gallons or more in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $3-300 per gallon range.
Formula results shall be rounded to the nearest 0.01 to determine damages liability as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down, and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up. For spills less than one thousand gallons, when the formula results in damages less than one dollar per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of one dollar per gallon spilled. For spills of one thousand gallons or more in volume, when the formula results in damages less than three dollars per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of three dollars per gallon spilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-850, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13; WSR 09-07-029 (Order 08-14), § 173-183-850, filed 3/10/09, effective 4/10/09. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 03-11-010 (Order 03-03), § 173-183-850, filed 5/12/03, effective 6/12/03; WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-850, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-860

Calculation of damages for spills into freshwater wetlands.

(1) The formula provided in subsection (2) of this section shall be used to determine damages liability for spills into freshwater wetlands. The value of the variables used in the formula shall be determined by:
(a) The OSC as enumerated in WAC 173-183-810(1);
(b) The mutually agreed upon independent expert, if applicable, as described in WAC 173-183-810(2); and
(c) The RDA committee chair as enumerated in WAC 173-183-820 (1)(d).
(2) Damages liability shall be calculated using the following formula:
Damages ($) =
 
 
x * [(OILAT *SVS *total gallons spilled) + (OILMI *SVS *total gallons spilled) + (OILPER *SVS *total gallons spilled)]
where:
total gallons spilled = the number of gallons of oil spilled as determined by the procedures outlined in WAC 173-183-810;
 
 
SVS = Spill vulnerability score (from WAC 173-183-700(3));
 
 
OILAT = Acute Toxicity Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340);
 
 
OILMI = Mechanical Injury Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340); and
 
 
OILPER = Persistence Score for Oil (from WAC 173-183-340).
 
 
x = multiplier of 1.620 for spills less than 1000 gallons in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $1-100 per gallon range.
 
 
x = multiplier of 4.860 for spills of 1000 gallons or more in volume to adjust the damages calculated to the $3-300 per gallon range.
Formula results shall be rounded to the nearest 0.01 to determine damages liability as follows: Decimals less than 0.005 shall be rounded down, and decimals equal to or greater than 0.005 shall be rounded up. For spills less than one thousand gallons, when the formula results in damages less than one dollar per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of one dollar per gallon spilled. For spills of one thousand gallons or more in volume, when the formula results in damages less than three dollars per gallon, the damages shall be adjusted to the minimum of three dollars per gallon spilled.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-860, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13; WSR 09-07-029 (Order 08-14), § 173-183-860, filed 3/10/09, effective 4/10/09. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 03-11-010 (Order 03-03), § 173-183-860, filed 5/12/03, effective 6/12/03; WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-860, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-865

Calculation of damages for spills entering more than one type of receiving environment.

For spills that enter more than one type of receiving environment, as classified in WAC 173-183-400, 173-183-500, 173-183-600, and 173-183-700, damages liability shall be determined as follows:
(1) Damages shall be calculated using the procedures enumerated in WAC 173-183-800 through 173-183-890 for each of the receiving environment types exposed to spilled oil;
(2) Total damages liability shall be equal to the greatest of the damages calculated for the receiving environment types exposed to spilled oil as determined in subsection (1) of this section.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-865, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-870

Reduction of damages based on actions taken by the potential liable party (PLP).

(1) Damages liability calculated under WAC 173-183-830 through 173-183-860 may be reduced by the RDA committee based on post-spill actions by the PLP. Post-spill actions by the PLP that the RDA committee will evaluate are:
(a) Actions that result in effective containment of spilled oil, as determined by the state on-scene coordinator (OSC).
(b) Actions that keep spilled oil from contacting the shoreline, as determined by the state on-scene coordinator (OSC).
(c) Actions that recover spilled nonpersistent oil from the water's surface within twenty-four hours of the oil first entering the water. Spilled oil that consists of a combination of spilled nonpersistent and spilled persistent oil will be considered a nonpersistent oil.
(d) Actions that recover spilled persistent oil from the surface of the water within forty-eight hours of the oil first entering the water.
(2)(a) The RDA committee may only reduce resource damages under this section based on documented recovery data submitted to ecology by the PLP. The RDA committee may request additional information to facilitate recovery credit calculations. The data may be submitted on form number ECY-050-49, or other means that are acceptable to ecology. The submission may be electronic or other means that are acceptable to ecology. Measurement and documentation of recovered oil must be accomplished by the methods described in subsection (8) of this section, or as approved by the state OSC.
(b) Along with the data submitted by the PLP, the PLP must also submit:
(i) A statement signed and dated by the PLP or their representative, which states: "The data submitted are correct and accurate to the best of my knowledge."
(ii)(A) A statement signed by the state OSC that containment was either effective or not effective; and
(B) That spilled oil did or did not contact the shoreline;
(iii) A statement signed and dated by the state OSC that states: "I accept the information provided by the PLP and attest to the recovery data provided."
(c) The PLP must allow the state on-scene coordinator or their representative the opportunity to observe recovery credit calculation operations (storage, weighing, squeezing, and sampling).
(3)(a) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-830(3) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSATj*OilAT*total gallons spilled)  + (SVSMIj*OilMI *{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours}) + (SVSPERj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-830(3).
(b) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-840(2) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilMI*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours}) + (SVSj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-840(2).
(c) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-850(2) and 173-183-860(2) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVS*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilMI*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours} + (SVS*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-850(2) or 173-183-860(2).
(4)(a) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-830(3) is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSATj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSMIj*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVSPERj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-830(3).
(b) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-840(2) is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-840(2).
(c) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(c) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-850(2) and 173-183-860(2), is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of nonpersistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within twenty-four hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVS*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 24 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-850(2) or 173-183-860(2).
(5)(a) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-830(3) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSATj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSMIj*OilMI*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours}) + (SVSPERj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-830(3).
(b) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-840(2) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilMI*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours}) + (SVSj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-840(2).
(c) When the conditions specified under subsection (1)(a), (b), and (d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-850(2) and 173-183-860(2) is modified by having the mechanical injury and persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled, as determined by WAC 173-183-810, and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVS*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilMI*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours}) + (SVS*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-850(2) or 173-183-860(2).
(6)(a) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-830(3) is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSATj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSMIj*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVSPERj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-830(3).
(b) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-840(2) is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVSj*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVSj*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-840(2).
(c) When only the conditions specified under subsection (1)(d) of this section are met, calculation of damages under WAC 173-183-850(2) and 173-183-860(2), is modified by having the persistence components multiplied by the difference between the total gallons spilled and the gallons of persistent oil recovered from the water by spill responders within forty-eight hours, such that:
Damages ($) = x * [(SVS*OilAT*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilMI*total gallons spilled) + (SVS*OilPER*{total gallons spilled - gallons recovered in 48 hours})]
x = appropriate multiplier as determined in WAC 173-183-850(2) or 173-183-860(2).
(7) In no case shall the modifications to damages liability enumerated in subsections (3) through (6) of this section result in a reduction of damages to less than one dollar per gallon of oil spilled for those spills of less than one thousand gallons total, and three dollars per gallon of oil spilled for those spills of one thousand gallons or more in total.
(8)(a) To reduce resource damage liability, the PLP must provide oil recovery information to the OSC. The PLP may provide the information required in (b) of this subsection on form number ECY-050-49, or other means that are acceptable to ecology. The submission may be electronic or other means that are acceptable to ecology. Ecology may request additional information if it is needed to facilitate recovery credit calculations.
(b) The information provided must include:
(i) Date and time of the initial spill.
(ii) Date and time of when mechanical recovery operations ended, when oiled sorbents were removed from the water, and when oiled debris were removed from the water.
(iii) Name and contact information for the PLP.
(iv) Name of the contractors doing clean-up work, if different than the PLP.
(v) Spill source and location.
(vi) Oil type - Common name (gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, aviation fuel, kerosene, lube oil, hydraulic oil, transformer mineral oil, bunker oil, intermediate fuel oil, crude oil, asphalt, vegetable oil, other).
(vii) Specific gravity of the spilled oil and a determination of whether it is nonpersistent or persistent by definition (see WAC 173-183-100 (25) and (30)).
(viii) For persistent oils (WAC 173-183-100(30)), laboratory data that specifies the specific gravity of the oil.
(ix)(A) For mechanical or hand recovery operations, a record signed by the PLP's on-scene supervisor of the amount, in gallons, of water-oil mix, water, and oil in the storage device before recovery operations start. This record must be created prior to using the storage device for recovery operations. The amount of oil in each storage device used must be physically measured by measuring the thickness of oil on the water surface.
(B) To receive credit for oil mixed with water, including dissolved fractions or emulsified oil, oil must be measured by the collection of at least two representative samples of the water fraction from each storage device. The samples must be analyzed for oil content by a laboratory agreed upon by the OSC and PLP, and the results shared with the OSC.
(x) Verification that all oleophilic sorbent materials recovered from the water were stored separate from other spill generated wastes, were stored in double plastic bags to reduce leakage and evaporation, and were kept out of the rain as much as practicable.
(xi) For volumetric calculations of spent oleophilic sorbent materials, the PLP must provide the total gallons of mixed water-oil squeezed from the sorbents, the total water recovered, and total oil recovered. Oil remaining in the pads must then be calculated following (b)(xii) of this subsection.
(xii)(A) For gravimetric calculations of spent oleophilic sorbent materials, the PLP must provide the total weight of oiled sorbents, total weight of preoiled sorbents, total weight of recovered oil, and make the conversion to total gallons of oil recovered.
(B) Unless demonstrated otherwise by the PLP, the water content of spent oleophilic sorbent material is assumed to be twenty-five percent by weight.
(xiii) Verification that oiled debris removed from the water was collected with minimal water and stored separately from other spill generated wastes.
(xiv)(A) For recovery credit for oil recovered from debris on the water's surface, the PLP must take two representative samples of oiled debris from each area where debris is collected and have it analyzed for oil content by weight at a laboratory agreed upon by the OSC and PLP. The laboratory results must be shared with the OSC.
(B) The PLP must provide the weight of all the oiled debris recovered from the water from each collection area, the total weight of the oil in the debris based on (b)(xiv)(A) of this subsection, and the total gallons of oil in the debris.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 90.48.366, 90.56.050, 90.48.035. WSR 13-01-055 (Order 11-05), § 173-183-870, filed 12/14/12, effective 1/14/13. Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-870, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]
Reviser's note: The brackets and enclosed material in the text of the above section occurred in the copy filed by the agency.



PDF173-183-880

Damage claim.

(1) The department shall provide documentation to the liable party that details the information and calculations that were used to assess damages under the compensation schedule. This documentation shall be provided to the liable party along with the damages liability claim.
(2) The liable party shall pay the full amount specified in the damages liability claim to the department within thirty days of receipt.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-880, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-890

Substitution of damages.

The department may negotiate with a potentially liable party to perform restoration and enhancement projects or studies which may substitute for all or part of the damages determined through application of the procedures in WAC 173-183-300 through 173-183-870.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-890, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-900

Annual report.

The department shall submit an annual report to the appropriate standing committees of the legislature that addresses each spill for which the RDA committee was convened. The following information shall be included in the report for each spill addressed: The outcome of the preassessment screening, and compensation claims imposed or damage assessment studies conducted, and the revenues to and expenditures from the coastal protection fund.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-900, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-910

Severability.

If any provision of this rule or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the rule or application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected.
[Statutory Authority: Chapter 90.48 RCW. WSR 92-10-005 (Order 91-13), § 173-183-910, filed 4/23/92, effective 5/24/92.]



PDF173-183-920

Appendices.

APPENDIX 1: ESTUARINE WATERS OF THE STATE
APPENDIX 2: SPECIES AND SPECIES GROUPS INCLUDED IN THE MARINE FISH VULNERABILITY RANKING
Common Name
Scientific Name
Pacific sleeper shark
Somniosus pacificus
Spiny dogfish
Squalus acanthias
Skates
Rajidae
Spotted ratfish
Hyrodlaguscolleri
Green sturgeon
Acipensermedirostris
White sturgeon
Acipensertransmontanus
Pacific herring
Clupeapallasii
Northern anchovy
Engraulismordax
Surf smelt
Hypomesuspretiosus
Night smelt
Spirinchusstarksi
Long fin smelt
Spirinchusthaleichthys
Eulachon
Thaleichthyspacificus
Pacific cod
Gadusmacrocephalus
Pacific tomcod
Microgadusproximus
Walleye pollock
Theragrachalcogramma
Whiting
Merlucciusproductus
Plainfin midshipman
Porichthysnotatus
Tubesnout
Aulorhynchusfavidus
Three-spine stickleback
Gasterosteusaculeatus
Pacific Ocean perch
Sebastesalutus
Brown rockfish
Sebastesauriculatus
Silvergray rockfish
Sebastesbrevispinis
Copper rockfish
Sebastescaurinus
Puget Sound rockfish
Sebastesemphaeus
Widow rockfish
Sebastesentomelas
Yellowtail rockfish
Sebastesflavidus
Quillback rockfish
Sebastesmaliger
Black rockfish
Sebastesmelanops
Blue rockfish
Sebastesmystinus
China rockfish
Sebastesnebulosus
Bocaccio
Sebastespaucispinis
Canary rockfish
Sebastespinniger
Yelloweye rockfish
Sebastesruberrimus
Shortspine thornyhead
Sebastolobusalascanus
Longspine thornyhead
Sebastolobusaltivelis
Sablefish
Anoplopomafimbria
Kelp Greenling
Hexagrammosdecragrammus
Lingcod
Ophiodonelongatus
Red Irish lord
Hemilepidotus
Pacific staghorn
 
sculpin
Leptocottusarmatus
Cabezon
Scorpaenichthysmarmoratus
Redtail surfperch
Amphistichusrhodoterus
Shiner surfperch
Cymatogasteraggregata
Pile surfperch
Damalichthysvacca
Striped surfperch
Embiotocalateralis
Eelpouts
Zoarcidae
Snake prickleback
Lumpenussagitta
Gunnels
Pholididae
Wolf-eel
Anarrhichthysocellatus
Pacific sand lance
Ammodyteshexapterus
Pacific sand dab
Citharichthyssordidus
Speckled sand dab
Citharichthysstigmaeus
Arrowtooth flounder
Atheresthesstomias
Petrale sole
Eposettajordani
Rex sole
Glyptocephaluszachirus
Pacific halibut
Hippoglossusstenolepis
Rock sole
Lepidopsettabilineata
Dover sole
Microstomuspacificus
English sole
Parophrysvetulus
Starry Flounder
Platichthysstellatus
Sand sole
Psettichthysmelanostictus
APPENDIX 3: SPECIES INCLUDED IN THE SALMON VULNERABILITY RANKING
Common Name
Scientific Name
Chinook
Oncorhynchus tshawytscha
Coho
O. kisutch
Pink
O. gorbushca
Chum
O. keta
Sockeye
O. nerka
APPENDIX 4: SPECIES INCLUDED IN THE SHELLFISH VULNERABILITY RANKING
Common Name
Scientific Name
Pacific Oyster
Crassostrea gigas
Olympia Oyster
Ostrea lurida
Pacific Razor Clam
Siliqua patula
Geoduck
Panope generosa
Butter Clam
Saxidomus giganteus
Native Little Neck
Protothaca staminea
Manila Clam
Venerupis japonica
Gaper Clam
Tresus nuttalli
Horse Clam
T. capax
Eastern Soft Shell
Mya arenaria
Cockles
Clinocardium nuttalli
Pink Scallop
Chlamys rubida
Spiny Scallop
C. hastata
Rock Scallop
Hinnites multirugous
Weathervane Scallop
Pecten caurinus
Bay Mussel
Mytilus spp.
California Mussel
M. californianus
Goose(neck) Barnacle
Pollicipes polymerus
Squid
Loligo opalescens
Octopus
Octopus dolfleini
Northern Abalone
Haliotis kamschatkana
Limpets
subsistence harvest species
Whelks
subsistence harvest species
Moon Snail
Polinices
Chitons
subsistence harvest species
Sea Cucumber
Parastichopus californicus
Red Sea Urchin
Strongylocentrotus
 
franciscanus
Green Sea Urchin
S. droebachiensis
Purple Sea Urchin
S. purpuratus
Dungeness Crab
Cancer magister
Red (Rock) Crab
C. productus
Spot Shrimp
Pandalus platyceros
Coon Stripe Shrimp
P. danae
Side Shrimp
Pandalopsis dispar
Pink Shrimp
Pandalus jordani & P. borealis
Ghost Shrimp
Callianassa spp.
Mud Shrimp
Upogebia pugettensis
Humpback Shrimp
Pandalus hypsinotus
APPENDIX 5: COMPENSATION SCHEDULE REGIONS AND SUBREGIONS
Region 1 Subregions
Northern Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca and Outer Coast Compensation Schedule Regions
Region 2 Subregions
REGION 3 SUBREGIONS 301 THROUGH 317
REGION 5 SUBREGIONS 501 THROUGH 507
REGION 6 SUBREGIONS 601 THROUGH 607
REGION 7 SUBREGIONS 701 AND 703
REGION 8 SUBREGIONS 801 AND 802
REGION 9 SUBREGIONS 901 THROUGH 903
REGION 10 SUBREGIONS 1001 AND 1002
REGION 11 SUBREGIONS 1101 THROUGH 1108
REGION 12 SUBREGIONS 1201 THROUGH 1203 AND 1205 THROUGH 1210
SUBREGIONS OF REGIONS 4, 14, 15 AND 16
APPENDIX 6: COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY SEASONAL RESOURCE SENSITIVITIES BY ONE SQUARE
KILOMETER GRID CELL
Columbia River Estuary Grid-Cell Indentification (CGRID-ID)
reference map (enlarged maps and sensitivity rankings follow)
Columbia River Estuary Grid-Cell Indentification (CGRID-ID) Reference Map
Columbia River Estuary Grid-Cell Indentification (CGRID-ID) Reference Map
Columbia River Estuary Grid-Cell Indentification (CGRID-ID) Reference Map
APPENDIX 6. COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY RESOURCE SENSITIVITY RANKINGS BY SEASON
 
FINAL
HUMAN USE
BIRD
MAMMAL
FISH
HABITAT
INVERT
Grid-Cell#
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
(Sp,Su,F,W)
0
1111
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9
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29
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30
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31
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32
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33
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34
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35
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1111
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36
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37
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38
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39
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1111
1111
1111
1111
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40
5555
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41
5555
1111
1111
1111
1111
5555
1111
42
5555
1111
1111
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43
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1111
1111
1111
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44
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1111
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2222
1111
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1111
45
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1111
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46
4432
1111
4432
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47
4422
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48
4433
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49
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50
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51
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52
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1131
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53
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1111
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54
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1131
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55
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56
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57
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58
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59
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60
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1111
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61
4432
1111
4432
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1111
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62
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1111
3333
1111
63
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
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64
5555
1111
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1111
1111
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1111
65
4444
1111
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1111
1111
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1111
66
5555
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67
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68
5555
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4422
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69
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1144
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70
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71
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72
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73
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74
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75
4422
1111
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76
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77
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78
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79
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80
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81
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82
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83
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84
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85
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86
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1131
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87
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88
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89
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90
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91
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92
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93
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94
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96
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99
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100
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105
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106
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107
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108
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109
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110
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113
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114
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115
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116
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117
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118
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119
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120
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121
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122
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124
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126
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127
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128
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129
3333
1111
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1111
130
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131
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132
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133
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134
1144
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135
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1111
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136
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137
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138
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139
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140
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141
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142
5533
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143
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144
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145
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146
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147
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148
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149
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150
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151
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152
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153
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154
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155
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156
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157
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158
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159
3333
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160
3333
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161
5555
1111
4432
1111
1111
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162
5555
1111
4444
1111
1111
5555
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163
4433
1111
4432
1111
1111
3333
1111
164
1131
1111
1131
1111
1111
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1111
165
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1111
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1111
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1111
166
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1111
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1111
167
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1111
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1111
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1111
168
4433
1111
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169
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1111
1111
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170
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1111
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1111
171
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1111
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172
4433
1111
4422
2222
1111
3333
1111
173
4422
1111
4422
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1111
1111
1111
174
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
175
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1111
4433
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1111
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1111
176
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1111
4433
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1111
3333
1111
177
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
3333
1111
178
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
179
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
180
5555
1111
5533
1111
1111
5555
1111
181
5555
1111
5533
1111
2222
5555
1111
182
4444
1111
4433
1111
2222
4444
1111
183
4433
1111
4433
1111
2222
3333
1111
194
5555
1111
4433
1111
2222
5555
1111
185
5555
1111
4433
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1111
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186
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1111
4433
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1111
4444
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187
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1111
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1111
1111
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188
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1111
4433
1111
1111
1111
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189
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1111
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1111
1111
1111
190
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1111
4433
1111
1111
4444
1111
191
4444
1111
1111
1111
1111
4444
1111
192
4444
1111
1131
1111
1111
4444
1111
193
4444
1111
1131
1111
1111
4444
1111
194
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1111
1131
1111
1111
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1111
195
3333
1111
1131
1111
1111
3333
1111
196
3333
1111
1131
1111
1111
3333
1111
197
3333
1111
1131
1111
1111
3333
1111
198
4444
1111
4433
1111
1111
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1111
199
4433
1111
4432
1111
1111
3333
1111
200
4433
1111
4432
1111
1111
3333
1111
201
3333
1111
1131
1111
1111
3333
1111
202
4433
1111
4432
1111
1111
3333
1111
203
4433
1111
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3333
1111
204
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1111
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1111
205
5555
1111
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1111
1111
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206
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1111
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1111
3333
1111
207
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
208
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
3333
1111
209
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
210
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
211
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
1111
1111
212
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
213
5555
1111
1111
1111
1111
5555
1111
214
5555
1111
1111
1111
1111
5555
1111
215
3333
1111
1111
1111
1111
3333
1111
216
2222
1111
1111
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1111
217
2222
1111
1111
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1111
218
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1111
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1111
219
2222
1111
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1111
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220
4422
1111
4422
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1111
1111
1111
221
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
222
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
223
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
224
4422
1111
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1111
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1111
225
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1111
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1111
1111
1111
226
4422
1111
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1111
1111
1111
227
4422
1111
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2222
1111
1111
1111
228
4433
1111
4433
2222
1111
1111
1111
229
4433
1111
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2222
2222
1111
1111
230
4433
1111
4433
1111
2222
3333
1111
231
4433
1111
4433
1111
2222
3333
1111
232
5555
1111
4433
1111
2222
5555
1111
233
4433
1111
4432
1111
2222
3333
1111
234
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
235
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
1111
1111
236
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
3333
1111
237
4433
1111
4433
1111
1111
1111
1111
238
4444
1111
4433
1111
1111
4444
1111
239
4444
1111
4433
1111
1111
4444
1111
240
4444
1111
4422
1111
1111
4444
1111
241
4444
1111
4422
1111
1111
4444
1111
242
4444
1111
4422
1111
2222
4444
1111
243
4444
1111
4432
1111
2222
4444
1111
244
4444
1111
4433
1111
2222
4444
1111
245
5544
1111
5533
1111
1111
4444
1111
246
5544
1111
5533
1111
1111
4444
1111
247
5544
1111
5532
1111
1111
4444
1111
248
5544
1111
5532
1111
1111
4444
1111
249
5555
1111
4432
1111
1111
5555
1111
250
5555
1111
4432
1111
1111
5555
1111
251
4432
1111
4432
1111
1111
1111
1111
252
4433
1111
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1111
1111
3333
1111
253
4433
1111
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1111
1111
3333
1111
254
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1111
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1111
1111
3333
1111
255
4433
1111
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1111
1111
3333
1111
256
4433
1111
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1111
1111
3333
1111
257
4433
1111
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1111
1111
1111
1111
258
4433
1111
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3333
1111
259
5555
1111
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1111
1111
5555
1111
260
5555
1111
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1111
1111
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1111
261
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
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1111
262
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
263
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
264
5555
1111
4433
1111
1111
5555
1111
265
5555
1111
5533
1111
1111
5555
1111
266
5555
1111
5533
1111
1111
5555
1111
267
5555
1111
1111
1111
1111
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1111
268
2222
1111
1111
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269
2222
1111
1111
2222
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1111
270
2222
1111
1111
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1111
1111
1111
271
2222
1111
1111
2222
1111
1111
1111
272
4422
1111
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2222
1111
1111
1111
273
4422
1111
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1111
1111
1111
274
4422
1111
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2222
1111
1111
1111
275
4422
1111
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2222
1111
1111
1111
276
4433
1111
4422
2222
1111
3333
1111
277
4433
1111
4422
2222
1111
3333
1111
278
4433
1111
4422
2222
1111
3333
1111
279
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
280
4422
1111
4422
2222
1111
1111
1111
281
4432
1111
4432
2222
1111
1111
1111
282