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Definitions.

ANSI. The American National Standards Institute.
Authorized person (maintenance). A person who has been designated to perform maintenance on a PIT.
Authorized person (training). A person approved or assigned by the employer to perform training for powered industrial truck operators.
Approved. Listed or approved by a nationally recognized testing laboratory or a federal agency that issues approvals for equipment such as the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA); the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH); Department of Transportation; or U.S. Coast Guard, which issue approvals for such equipment.
Bridge plate (dock-board). A device used to span the distance between rail cars or highway vehicles and loading platforms.
Classified location or hazardous location. Areas that could be hazardous because of explosive or flammable atmospheres. These locations are broken down into the following categories:
(a) Class I locations are areas where flammable gases or vapors are or may be present in the air in quantities sufficient to produce explosive or ignitable mixtures.
(b) Class II locations are areas where the presence of combustible dust could be sufficient to produce explosions.
(c) Class III locations are areas where the presence of easily ignitable fibers are suspended in the air but are not in large enough quantities to produce ignitable mixtures.
Counterweight. A weight used to counteract or the load being carried by the truck, or to increase the load carrying capacity of a truck.
Designations. A code used to show the different types of hazardous (classified) locations where PITs can be safely used:
(a) D refers to trucks that are diesel engine powered that have minimum safeguards against inherent fire hazards.
(b) DS refers to diesel powered trucks that, in addition to meeting all the requirements for type D trucks, are provided with additional safeguards to the exhaust, fuel and electrical systems.
(c) DY refers to diesel powered trucks that have all the safe-guards of the DS trucks and, in addition, any electrical equipment is completely enclosed. They are equipped with temperature limitation features.
(d) E refers to electrically powered trucks that have minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards.
(e) ES refers to electrically powered trucks that, in addition to all of the requirements for the E trucks, have additional safeguards to the electrical system to prevent emission of hazardous sparks and to limit surface temperatures.
(f) EE refers to electrically powered trucks that have, in addition to all of the requirements for the E and ES type trucks, have their electric motors and all other electrical equipment completely enclosed.
(g) EX refers to electrically powered trucks that differ from E, ES, or EE type trucks in that the electrical fittings and equipment are designed, constructed and assembled to be used in atmospheres containing flammable vapors or dusts.
(h) G refers to gasoline powered trucks that have minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards.
(i) GS refers to gasoline powered trucks that are provided with additional exhaust, fuel, and electrical systems safeguards.
(j) LP refers to liquefied petroleum gas-powered trucks that, in addition to meeting all the requirements for type G trucks, have minimum acceptable safeguards against inherent fire hazards.
(k) LPS refers to liquefied petroleum gas powered trucks that in addition to meeting the requirements for LP type trucks, have additional exhaust, fuel, and electrical systems safeguards.
Electrolyte. A chemical, usually acid, that is mixed with water to produce electricity.
Flammable liquid. Any liquid having a flashpoint at or below 199.4°F (93°C). Flammable liquids are divided into four categories as follows:
(a) Category 1 includes liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point at or below 95°F (35°C).
(b) Category 2 includes liquids having flashpoints below 73.4°F (23°C) and having a boiling point above 95°F (35°C).
(c) Category 3 includes liquids having flashpoints at or above 73.4°F (23°C) and at or below 140°F (60°C). When a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint below 100°F (37.8°C).
(d) Category 4 includes liquids having flashpoints above 140°F (60°C) and at or below 199.4°F (93°C). When a Category 4 flammable liquid is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 3 liquid with a flashpoint at or above 100°F (37.8°C).
(e) When liquid with a flashpoint greater than 199.4°F (93°C) is heated for use to within 30°F (16.7°C) of its flashpoint, it must be handled in accordance with the requirements for a Category 4 flammable liquid.
Flashpoint. The minimum temperature at which a liquid gives off vapor within a test vessel in sufficient concentration to form an ignitable mixture with air near the surface of the liquid, and shall be determined as follows:
(a) For a liquid which has a viscosity of less than 45 SUS at 100°F (37.8°C), does not contain suspended solids, and does not have a tendency to form a surface film while under test, the procedure specified in the Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Tag Closed Tester (ASTM D-56-70), WAC 296-901-14024 Appendix BPhysical hazard criteria shall be used.
(b) For a liquid which has a viscosity of 45 SUS or more at 100°F (37.8°C), or contains suspended solids, or has a tendency to form a surface film while under test, the Standard Method of Test for Flashpoint by Pensky-Martens Closed Tester (ASTM D-93-71) or an equivalent method as defined by WAC 296-91-14024 Appendix BPhysical hazard criteria, shall be used, except that the methods specified in Note 1 to section 1.1 of ASTM D-93-71 may be used for the respective materials specified in the note.
(c) For a liquid that is a mixture of compounds that have different volatilities and flashpoints, its flashpoint shall be determined by using the procedure specified in (a) or (b) of this subsection on the liquid in the form it is shipped.
(d) Organic peroxides, which undergo auto-accelerating thermal decomposition, are excluded from any of the flashpoint determination methods specified in this section.
Front-end attachment. A device that is attached to the forks or lifting device of the truck.
Lanyard. A flexible line of webbing, rope, or cable used to secure a harness to an anchor point.
Liquefied petroleum gas. Any gas that is composed predominantly of the following hydrocarbons, or mixtures of them; propane, propylene, butanes (normal butane or iso-butane), and butylenes.
Listed by report. A report listing the field assembly, installation procedures, or both, for a UL listed product that does not have generally recognized installation requirements.
Load engaging. A device attached to a powered industrial truck and used to manipulate or carry a load.
Motorized hand truck. A powered truck with wheeled forks designed to go under or between pallets and is controlled by a walking or riding operator.
Nationally recognized testing laboratory. An organization recognized by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration that conducts safety tests on equipment and materials.
Order picker. A truck controlled by an operator who is stationed on a platform that moves with the load engaging means.
Powered industrial truck (PIT). A mobile, power-driven vehicle used to carry, push, pull, lift, stack, or tier material.
Rough terrain forklift truck. A truck intended to be used on unimproved natural terrain and at construction sites.
Safety harness (full body harness). A configuration of connected straps to distribute a fall arresting force over at least the thighs, shoulders and pelvis, with provisions for attaching a lanyard, lifeline, or deceleration devices.
Tie-off point (anchorage). A secure point to attach a lanyard that meets the requirements of WAC 296-24-88050, Appendix—C Personal fall arrest systems.
Vertical load backrest extension. A device that extends vertically from the fork carriage frame.
[Statutory Authority: RCW 49.17.010, 49.17.040, 49.17.050, and 49.17.060. WSR 17-18-075, § 296-863-099, filed 9/5/17, effective 10/6/17.]
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