Chapter 71.05 RCW

MENTAL ILLNESS

Sections
Legislative intent.
Legislative intent and finding.
Definitions.
Integration with chapter 71.24 RCWBehavioral health organizations.
Behavioral health organizations contractsLimitation on state liability.
Integrated comprehensive screening and assessment for chemical dependency and mental disorders.
Commitment laws applicable.
Joinder of petitions for commitment.
Detention or judicial commitment of persons with developmental disabilities, impaired by chronic alcoholism or drug abuse, or suffering from dementia.
Voluntary application for mental health servicesRightsReview of condition and statusDetentionPerson refusing voluntary admission, temporary detention.
Financial responsibility.
Compensation of appointed counsel.
Exemptions from liability.
Duties of prosecuting attorney and attorney general.
Court-ordered treatmentRequired notifications.
Mental health commissionersAppointment.
Mental health commissionersAuthority.
Records maintained.
Offenders with mental illness who are believed to be dangerousLess restrictive alternative.
Detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of persons with mental disordersProcedure.
Emergency detention of persons with mental disordersProcedure.
Detention of persons with mental disordersEvaluationConsultation with emergency room physician.
EvaluationIndividual with grave disability.
Evaluation by designated mental health professionalWhen requiredRequired notifications.
Petition for initial detention.
Acceptance of petitionNoticeDuty of state hospital.
Detention period for evaluation and treatment.
Persons not admittedTransportationDetention of arrested person pending return to custody.
Not guilty by reason of insanityDetention of persons who have fled from state of originProbable cause hearing.
Decision not to detainPetition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservatorCourt review.
NoticePetition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservator.
EvaluationTreatment and careRelease or other disposition.
EvaluationConsideration of information and records.
ProtocolsDevelopmentSubmission to governor and legislature.
Right to refuse antipsychotic medicineRules.
RightsPosting of list.
Property of committed person.
Procedures for additional treatment.
Discharge reviewsConsultations, notifications required.
Examination, evaluation of criminal defendantHearing.
Judicial proceedingsCourt to enter findings when recommendations of professional person not followed.
Petition for involuntary treatment or alternative treatmentProbable cause hearing.
Determination of grave disability, likelihood of serious harm, or need of assisted outpatient treatmentUse of recent history evidence.
Release from involuntary intensive treatmentException.
Temporary release.
Additional commitmentGrounds.
Additional confinementPrior history evidence.
Petition for additional commitmentAffidavit.
Filing of petitionAppearanceNoticeAdvice as to rightsAppointment of attorney, expert, or professional person.
Time for hearingDue processJury trialContinuation of treatment.
Remand for additional treatmentLess restrictive alternativesDurationGroundsHearing.
ReleaseAuthorized leaveNotice to prosecuting attorney.
Early releaseNotice to court and prosecuting attorneyPetition for hearing.
Modification of order for inpatient treatmentIntervention by prosecuting attorney.
Outpatient treatment or careConditional release.
Assistance to released persons.
Rights of involuntarily detained persons.
Involuntary commitmentIndividualized discharge plan.
Rights of voluntarily committed persons.
Persons committed following dismissal of sex, violent, or felony harassment offenseNotification of conditional release, final release, leave, transfer, or escapeTo whom givenDefinitions.
Discharge of person from evaluation and treatment facility or state hospitalNotice to designated mental health professional office.
Court-ordered mental health treatment of persons subject to department of corrections supervisionInitial assessment inquiryRequired notificationsRules.
Law enforcement referrals to mental health agenciesReports of threatened or attempted suicideModel policy.
Law enforcement referrals to mental health agenciesReports of threatened or attempted suicideGeneral authority law enforcement policy.
Law enforcement referralThreatened or attempted suicideContact by mental health professional.
Liability of applicant.
Damages for excessive detention.
Protection of rightsStaff.
Transfer of person committed to juvenile correction institution to institution or facility for juveniles with mental illnesses.
Facilities part of comprehensive mental health program.
Adoption of rules.
Rules of court.
Less restrictive alternative treatmentConsideration by court.
Less restrictive alternative treatment.
Less restrictive alternative or conditional release ordersEnforcement, modification, or revocation.
Less restrictive alternative treatment orderTermination.
Court files and records closedExceptionsRules.
Treatment recordsPrivileged communications unaffected.
Treatment recordsAccess under false pretenses, penalty.
Home visit by designated mental health professional or crisis intervention workerAccompaniment by second trained individual.
Provider of designated mental health professional or crisis outreach servicesPolicy for home visits.
Home visit by mental health professionalWireless telephone to be provided.
Crisis visit by mental health professionalAccess to information.
Training for community mental health employees.
Judicial servicesCivil commitment casesReimbursement.
Reimbursement for judicial servicesAssessment.
Reporting of commitment data.
Single bed certification.
ReportPerson meets detention criteriaUnavailable detention facilities.
ReportUnavailable detention facilitiesResponsibility of regional support network or behavioral health organizationCorrective actions.
Designated crisis respondersTrainingTransition processSecure detoxification facility capacity.
Persons with developmental disabilitiesService plansHabilitation services.
Integration evaluation.
Construction1973 1st ex.s. c 142.
Section headings not part of the law.
Effective date1973 1st ex.s. c 142.
Equal application of 1989 c 420Evaluation for developmental disability.
ConstructionChapter applicable to state registered domestic partnerships2009 c 521.
NOTES:
Rules of court: Cf. Superior Court Mental Proceedings Rules (MPR).
Reviser's note: The department of social and health services filed an emergency order, WSR 89-20-030, effective October 1, 1989, establishing rules for the recognition and certification of regional support networks. A final order was filed on January 24, 1990, effective January 25, 1990.
Council for children and families: Chapter 43.121 RCW.
Implementation of chapter through behavioral health organizations: RCW 71.24.310.
MinorsMental health services, commitment: Chapter 71.34 RCW.


71.05.010
Legislative intent. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) The provisions of this chapter are intended by the legislature:
(a) To protect the health and safety of persons suffering from mental disorders and to protect public safety through use of the parens patriae and police powers of the state;
(b) To prevent inappropriate, indefinite commitment of mentally disordered persons and to eliminate legal disabilities that arise from such commitment;
(c) To provide prompt evaluation and timely and appropriate treatment of persons with serious mental disorders;
(d) To safeguard individual rights;
(e) To provide continuity of care for persons with serious mental disorders;
(f) To encourage the full use of all existing agencies, professional personnel, and public funds to prevent duplication of services and unnecessary expenditures; and
(g) To encourage, whenever appropriate, that services be provided within the community.
(2) When construing the requirements of this chapter the court must focus on the merits of the petition, except where requirements have been totally disregarded, as provided in In re C.W., 147 Wn.2d 259, 281 (2002). A presumption in favor of deciding petitions on their merits furthers both public and private interests because the mental and physical well-being of individuals as well as public safety may be implicated by the decision to release an individual and discontinue his or her treatment.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: "Sections 1 through 9 and 11 through 13 of this act are necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and take effect immediately [May 14, 2015]." [ 2015 c 269 § 20.]
Effective dates1998 c 297: "This act takes effect July 1, 1998, except for sections 18, 35, 38, and 39 of this act, which take effect March 1, 1999." [ 1998 c 297 § 53.]
Severability1998 c 297: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1998 c 297 § 58.]
Intent1998 c 297: "It is the intent of the legislature to: (1) Clarify that it is the nature of a person's current conduct, current mental condition, history, and likelihood of committing future acts that pose a threat to public safety or himself or herself, rather than simple categorization of offenses, that should determine treatment procedures and level; (2) improve and clarify the sharing of information between the mental health and criminal justice systems; and (3) provide additional opportunities for mental health treatment for persons whose conduct threatens himself or herself or threatens public safety and has led to contact with the criminal justice system.
The legislature recognizes that a person can be incompetent to stand trial, but may not be gravely disabled or may not present a likelihood of serious harm. The legislature does not intend to create a presumption that a person who is found incompetent to stand trial is gravely disabled or presents a likelihood of serious harm requiring civil commitment." [ 1998 c 297 § 1.]

71.05.010
Legislative intent. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) The provisions of this chapter are intended by the legislature:
(a) To protect the health and safety of persons suffering from mental disorders and substance use disorders and to protect public safety through use of the parens patriae and police powers of the state;
(b) To prevent inappropriate, indefinite commitment of mentally disordered persons and persons with substance use disorders and to eliminate legal disabilities that arise from such commitment;
(c) To provide prompt evaluation and timely and appropriate treatment of persons with serious mental disorders and substance use disorders;
(d) To safeguard individual rights;
(e) To provide continuity of care for persons with serious mental disorders and substance use disorders;
(f) To encourage the full use of all existing agencies, professional personnel, and public funds to prevent duplication of services and unnecessary expenditures; and
(g) To encourage, whenever appropriate, that services be provided within the community.
(2) When construing the requirements of this chapter the court must focus on the merits of the petition, except where requirements have been totally disregarded, as provided in In re C.W., 147 Wn.2d 259, 281 (2002). A presumption in favor of deciding petitions on their merits furthers both public and private interests because the mental and physical well-being of individuals as well as public safety may be implicated by the decision to release an individual and discontinue his or her treatment.
NOTES:
Short title2016 1st sp.s. c 29: "This act may be known and cited as Ricky Garcia's act." [ 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 801.]
Right of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: "This act does not create any new entitlement or cause of action related to civil commitment under this chapter, and cannot form the basis for a private right of action." [ 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 802.]
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: "Sections 1 through 9 and 11 through 13 of this act are necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and take effect immediately [May 14, 2015]." [ 2015 c 269 § 20.]
Effective dates1998 c 297: "This act takes effect July 1, 1998, except for sections 18, 35, 38, and 39 of this act, which take effect March 1, 1999." [ 1998 c 297 § 53.]
Severability1998 c 297: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1998 c 297 § 58.]
Intent1998 c 297: "It is the intent of the legislature to: (1) Clarify that it is the nature of a person's current conduct, current mental condition, history, and likelihood of committing future acts that pose a threat to public safety or himself or herself, rather than simple categorization of offenses, that should determine treatment procedures and level; (2) improve and clarify the sharing of information between the mental health and criminal justice systems; and (3) provide additional opportunities for mental health treatment for persons whose conduct threatens himself or herself or threatens public safety and has led to contact with the criminal justice system.
The legislature recognizes that a person can be incompetent to stand trial, but may not be gravely disabled or may not present a likelihood of serious harm. The legislature does not intend to create a presumption that a person who is found incompetent to stand trial is gravely disabled or presents a likelihood of serious harm requiring civil commitment." [ 1998 c 297 § 1.]



71.05.012
Legislative intent and finding.

It is the intent of the legislature to enhance continuity of care for persons with serious mental disorders that can be controlled or stabilized in a less restrictive alternative commitment. Within the guidelines stated in In Re LaBelle 107 Wn. 2d 196 (1986), the legislature intends to encourage appropriate interventions at a point when there is the best opportunity to restore the person to or maintain satisfactory functioning.
For persons with a prior history or pattern of repeated hospitalizations or law enforcement interventions due to decompensation, the consideration of prior mental history is particularly relevant in determining whether the person would receive, if released, such care as is essential for his or her health or safety.
Therefore, the legislature finds that for persons who are currently under a commitment order, a prior history of decompensation leading to repeated hospitalizations or law enforcement interventions should be given great weight in determining whether a new less restrictive alternative commitment should be ordered.



71.05.020
Definitions. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

The definitions in this section apply throughout this chapter unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(1) "Admission" or "admit" means a decision by a physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner that a person should be examined or treated as a patient in a hospital;
(2) "Antipsychotic medications" means that class of drugs primarily used to treat serious manifestations of mental illness associated with thought disorders, which includes, but is not limited to atypical antipsychotic medications;
(3) "Attending staff" means any person on the staff of a public or private agency having responsibility for the care and treatment of a patient;
(4) "Commitment" means the determination by a court that a person should be detained for a period of either evaluation or treatment, or both, in an inpatient or a less restrictive setting;
(5) "Conditional release" means a revocable modification of a commitment, which may be revoked upon violation of any of its terms;
(6) "Crisis stabilization unit" means a short-term facility or a portion of a facility licensed by the department of health and certified by the department of social and health services under RCW 71.24.035, such as an evaluation and treatment facility or a hospital, which has been designed to assess, diagnose, and treat individuals experiencing an acute crisis without the use of long-term hospitalization;
(7) "Custody" means involuntary detention under the provisions of this chapter or chapter 10.77 RCW, uninterrupted by any period of unconditional release from commitment from a facility providing involuntary care and treatment;
(8) "Department" means the department of social and health services;
(9) "Designated chemical dependency specialist" means a person designated by the county alcoholism and other drug addiction program coordinator designated under *RCW 70.96A.310 to perform the commitment duties described in chapters 70.96A and 70.96B RCW;
(10) "Designated crisis responder" means a mental health professional appointed by the county or the behavioral health organization to perform the duties specified in this chapter;
(11) "Designated mental health professional" means a mental health professional designated by the county or other authority authorized in rule to perform the duties specified in this chapter;
(12) "Detention" or "detain" means the lawful confinement of a person, under the provisions of this chapter;
(13) "Developmental disabilities professional" means a person who has specialized training and three years of experience in directly treating or working with persons with developmental disabilities and is a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or social worker, and such other developmental disabilities professionals as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary;
(14) "Developmental disability" means that condition defined in RCW 71A.10.020(5);
(15) "Discharge" means the termination of hospital medical authority. The commitment may remain in place, be terminated, or be amended by court order;
(16) "Evaluation and treatment facility" means any facility which can provide directly, or by direct arrangement with other public or private agencies, emergency evaluation and treatment, outpatient care, and timely and appropriate inpatient care to persons suffering from a mental disorder, and which is certified as such by the department. The department may certify single beds as temporary evaluation and treatment beds under RCW 71.05.745. A physically separate and separately operated portion of a state hospital may be designated as an evaluation and treatment facility. A facility which is part of, or operated by, the department or any federal agency will not require certification. No correctional institution or facility, or jail, shall be an evaluation and treatment facility within the meaning of this chapter;
(17) "Gravely disabled" means a condition in which a person, as a result of a mental disorder: (a) Is in danger of serious physical harm resulting from a failure to provide for his or her essential human needs of health or safety; or (b) manifests severe deterioration in routine functioning evidenced by repeated and escalating loss of cognitive or volitional control over his or her actions and is not receiving such care as is essential for his or her health or safety;
(18) "Habilitative services" means those services provided by program personnel to assist persons in acquiring and maintaining life skills and in raising their levels of physical, mental, social, and vocational functioning. Habilitative services include education, training for employment, and therapy. The habilitative process shall be undertaken with recognition of the risk to the public safety presented by the person being assisted as manifested by prior charged criminal conduct;
(19) "History of one or more violent acts" refers to the period of time ten years prior to the filing of a petition under this chapter, excluding any time spent, but not any violent acts committed, in a mental health facility or in confinement as a result of a criminal conviction;
(20) "Imminent" means the state or condition of being likely to occur at any moment or near at hand, rather than distant or remote;
(21) "In need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment" means that a person, as a result of a mental disorder: (a) Has been committed by a court to detention for involuntary mental health treatment at least twice during the preceding thirty-six months, or, if the person is currently committed for involuntary mental health treatment, the person has been committed to detention for involuntary mental health treatment at least once during the thirty-six months preceding the date of initial detention of the current commitment cycle; (b) is unlikely to voluntarily participate in outpatient treatment without an order for less restrictive alternative treatment, in view of the person's treatment history or current behavior; (c) is unlikely to survive safely in the community without supervision; (d) is likely to benefit from less restrictive alternative treatment; and (e) requires less restrictive alternative treatment to prevent a relapse, decompensation, or deterioration that is likely to result in the person presenting a likelihood of serious harm or the person becoming gravely disabled within a reasonably short period of time. For purposes of (a) of this subsection, time spent in a mental health facility or in confinement as a result of a criminal conviction is excluded from the thirty-six month calculation;
(22) "Individualized service plan" means a plan prepared by a developmental disabilities professional with other professionals as a team, for a person with developmental disabilities, which shall state:
(a) The nature of the person's specific problems, prior charged criminal behavior, and habilitation needs;
(b) The conditions and strategies necessary to achieve the purposes of habilitation;
(c) The intermediate and long-range goals of the habilitation program, with a projected timetable for the attainment;
(d) The rationale for using this plan of habilitation to achieve those intermediate and long-range goals;
(e) The staff responsible for carrying out the plan;
(f) Where relevant in light of past criminal behavior and due consideration for public safety, the criteria for proposed movement to less-restrictive settings, criteria for proposed eventual discharge or release, and a projected possible date for discharge or release; and
(g) The type of residence immediately anticipated for the person and possible future types of residences;
(23) "Information related to mental health services" means all information and records compiled, obtained, or maintained in the course of providing services to either voluntary or involuntary recipients of services by a mental health service provider. This may include documents of legal proceedings under this chapter or chapter 71.34 or 10.77 RCW, or somatic health care information;
(24) "Judicial commitment" means a commitment by a court pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(25) "Legal counsel" means attorneys and staff employed by county prosecutor offices or the state attorney general acting in their capacity as legal representatives of public mental health service providers under RCW 71.05.130;
(26) "Less restrictive alternative treatment" means a program of individualized treatment in a less restrictive setting than inpatient treatment that includes the services described in RCW 71.05.585;
(27) "Likelihood of serious harm" means:
(a) A substantial risk that: (i) Physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon his or her own person, as evidenced by threats or attempts to commit suicide or inflict physical harm on oneself; (ii) physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon another, as evidenced by behavior which has caused such harm or which places another person or persons in reasonable fear of sustaining such harm; or (iii) physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon the property of others, as evidenced by behavior which has caused substantial loss or damage to the property of others; or
(b) The person has threatened the physical safety of another and has a history of one or more violent acts;
(28) "Medical clearance" means a physician or other health care provider has determined that a person is medically stable and ready for referral to the designated mental health professional;
(29) "Mental disorder" means any organic, mental, or emotional impairment which has substantial adverse effects on a person's cognitive or volitional functions;
(30) "Mental health professional" means a psychiatrist, psychologist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychiatric nurse, or social worker, and such other mental health professionals as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(31) "Mental health service provider" means a public or private agency that provides mental health services to persons with mental disorders as defined under this section and receives funding from public sources. This includes, but is not limited to, hospitals licensed under chapter 70.41 RCW, evaluation and treatment facilities as defined in this section, community mental health service delivery systems or community mental health programs as defined in **RCW 71.24.025, facilities conducting competency evaluations and restoration under chapter 10.77 RCW, and correctional facilities operated by state and local governments;
(32) "Peace officer" means a law enforcement official of a public agency or governmental unit, and includes persons specifically given peace officer powers by any state law, local ordinance, or judicial order of appointment;
(33) "Physician assistant" means a person licensed as a physician assistant under chapter 18.57A or 18.71A RCW;
(34) "Private agency" means any person, partnership, corporation, or association that is not a public agency, whether or not financed in whole or in part by public funds, which constitutes an evaluation and treatment facility or private institution, or hospital, which is conducted for, or includes a department or ward conducted for, the care and treatment of persons who are mentally ill;
(35) "Professional person" means a mental health professional and shall also mean a physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, registered nurse, and such others as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(36) "Psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner" means a person who is licensed as an advanced registered nurse practitioner pursuant to chapter 18.79 RCW; and who is board certified in advanced practice psychiatric and mental health nursing;
(37) "Psychiatrist" means a person having a license as a physician and surgeon in this state who has in addition completed three years of graduate training in psychiatry in a program approved by the American medical association or the American osteopathic association and is certified or eligible to be certified by the American board of psychiatry and neurology;
(38) "Psychologist" means a person who has been licensed as a psychologist pursuant to chapter 18.83 RCW;
(39) "Public agency" means any evaluation and treatment facility or institution, or hospital which is conducted for, or includes a department or ward conducted for, the care and treatment of persons with mental illness, if the agency is operated directly by, federal, state, county, or municipal government, or a combination of such governments;
(40) "Registration records" include all the records of the department, behavioral health organizations, treatment facilities, and other persons providing services to the department, county departments, or facilities which identify persons who are receiving or who at any time have received services for mental illness;
(41) "Release" means legal termination of the commitment under the provisions of this chapter;
(42) "Resource management services" has the meaning given in chapter 71.24 RCW;
(43) "Secretary" means the secretary of the department of social and health services, or his or her designee;
(44) "Serious violent offense" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 9.94A.030;
(45) "Social worker" means a person with a master's or further advanced degree from a social work educational program accredited and approved as provided in RCW 18.320.010;
(46) "Therapeutic court personnel" means the staff of a mental health court or other therapeutic court which has jurisdiction over defendants who are dually diagnosed with mental disorders, including court personnel, probation officers, a court monitor, prosecuting attorney, or defense counsel acting within the scope of therapeutic court duties;
(47) "Treatment records" include registration and all other records concerning persons who are receiving or who at any time have received services for mental illness, which are maintained by the department, by behavioral health organizations and their staffs, and by treatment facilities. Treatment records include mental health information contained in a medical bill including but not limited to mental health drugs, a mental health diagnosis, provider name, and dates of service stemming from a medical service. Treatment records do not include notes or records maintained for personal use by a person providing treatment services for the department, behavioral health organizations, or a treatment facility if the notes or records are not available to others;
(48) "Triage facility" means a short-term facility or a portion of a facility licensed by the department of health and certified by the department of social and health services under RCW 71.24.035, which is designed as a facility to assess and stabilize an individual or determine the need for involuntary commitment of an individual, and must meet department of health residential treatment facility standards. A triage facility may be structured as a voluntary or involuntary placement facility;
(49) "Violent act" means behavior that resulted in homicide, attempted suicide, nonfatal injuries, or substantial damage to property.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: *(1) RCW 70.96A.310 was repealed by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 601.
**(2) RCW 71.24.025 was amended by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 501, deleting the definition of "community mental health program."
(3) The definitions in this section have been alphabetized pursuant to RCW 1.08.015(2)(k).
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 10 and 14: See note following RCW 71.24.300.
Expiration dates2015 c 269 §§ 9, 13, and 15: See note following RCW 71.24.300.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 250 §§ 2, 15, and 19: "Sections 2, 15, and 19 of this act take effect April 1, 2016." [ 2015 c 250 § 23.]
Expiration date2015 c 250 §§ 1, 14, and 18: "Sections 1, 14, and 18 of this act expire April 1, 2016." [ 2015 c 250 § 22.]
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Certification of triage facilities2011 c 148: "Facilities operating as triage facilities as defined in RCW 71.05.020, whether or not they are certified by the department of social and health services, as of April 22, 2011, are not required to relicense or recertify under any new rules governing licensure or certification of triage facilities. The department of social and health services shall work with the Washington association of counties and the Washington association of sheriffs and police chiefs in creating rules that establish standards for certification of triage facilities. The department of health rules must not require triage facilities to provide twenty-four hour nursing." [ 2011 c 148 § 6.]
Effective date2011 c 148: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [April 22, 2011]." [ 2011 c 148 § 7.]
Effective date2011 c 89: See note following RCW 18.320.005.
Findings2011 c 89: See RCW 18.320.005.
Conflict with federal requirements2009 c 320: "If any part of this act is found to be in conflict with federal requirements that are a prescribed condition to the allocation of federal funds to the state, the conflicting part of this act is inoperative solely to the extent of the conflict and with respect to the agencies directly affected, and this finding does not affect the operation of the remainder of this act in its application to the agencies concerned. Rules adopted under this act must meet federal requirements that are a necessary condition to the receipt of federal funds by the state." [ 2009 c 320 § 6.]
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: "(1) The code reviser shall alphabetize and renumber the definitions, and correct any internal references affected by this act.
(2) The code reviser shall replace all references to "county designated mental health professional" with "designated mental health professional" in the Revised Code of Washington." [ 2005 c 504 § 811.]
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.020
Definitions. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

The definitions in this section apply throughout this chapter unless the context clearly requires otherwise.
(1) "Admission" or "admit" means a decision by a physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner that a person should be examined or treated as a patient in a hospital;
(2) "Alcoholism" means a disease, characterized by a dependency on alcoholic beverages, loss of control over the amount and circumstances of use, symptoms of tolerance, physiological or psychological withdrawal, or both, if use is reduced or discontinued, and impairment of health or disruption of social or economic functioning;
(3) "Antipsychotic medications" means that class of drugs primarily used to treat serious manifestations of mental illness associated with thought disorders, which includes, but is not limited to atypical antipsychotic medications;
(4) "Approved substance use disorder treatment program" means a program for persons with a substance use disorder provided by a treatment program certified by the department as meeting standards adopted under chapter 71.24 RCW;
(5) "Attending staff" means any person on the staff of a public or private agency having responsibility for the care and treatment of a patient;
(6) "Chemical dependency" means:
(a) Alcoholism;
(b) Drug addiction; or
(c) Dependence on alcohol and one or more psychoactive chemicals, as the context requires;
(7) "Chemical dependency professional" means a person certified as a chemical dependency professional by the department of health under chapter 18.205 RCW;
(8) "Commitment" means the determination by a court that a person should be detained for a period of either evaluation or treatment, or both, in an inpatient or a less restrictive setting;
(9) "Conditional release" means a revocable modification of a commitment, which may be revoked upon violation of any of its terms;
(10) "Crisis stabilization unit" means a short-term facility or a portion of a facility licensed by the department of health and certified by the department of social and health services under RCW 71.24.035, such as an evaluation and treatment facility or a hospital, which has been designed to assess, diagnose, and treat individuals experiencing an acute crisis without the use of long-term hospitalization;
(11) "Custody" means involuntary detention under the provisions of this chapter or chapter 10.77 RCW, uninterrupted by any period of unconditional release from commitment from a facility providing involuntary care and treatment;
(12) "Department" means the department of social and health services;
(13) "Designated crisis responder" means a mental health professional appointed by the behavioral health organization to perform the duties specified in this chapter;
(14) "Detention" or "detain" means the lawful confinement of a person, under the provisions of this chapter;
(15) "Developmental disabilities professional" means a person who has specialized training and three years of experience in directly treating or working with persons with developmental disabilities and is a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or social worker, and such other developmental disabilities professionals as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary;
(16) "Developmental disability" means that condition defined in RCW 71A.10.020(5);
(17) "Discharge" means the termination of hospital medical authority. The commitment may remain in place, be terminated, or be amended by court order;
(18) "Drug addiction" means a disease, characterized by a dependency on psychoactive chemicals, loss of control over the amount and circumstances of use, symptoms of tolerance, physiological or psychological withdrawal, or both, if use is reduced or discontinued, and impairment of health or disruption of social or economic functioning;
(19) "Evaluation and treatment facility" means any facility which can provide directly, or by direct arrangement with other public or private agencies, emergency evaluation and treatment, outpatient care, and timely and appropriate inpatient care to persons suffering from a mental disorder, and which is certified as such by the department. The department may certify single beds as temporary evaluation and treatment beds under RCW 71.05.745. A physically separate and separately operated portion of a state hospital may be designated as an evaluation and treatment facility. A facility which is part of, or operated by, the department or any federal agency will not require certification. No correctional institution or facility, or jail, shall be an evaluation and treatment facility within the meaning of this chapter;
(20) "Gravely disabled" means a condition in which a person, as a result of a mental disorder, or as a result of the use of alcohol or other psychoactive chemicals: (a) Is in danger of serious physical harm resulting from a failure to provide for his or her essential human needs of health or safety; or (b) manifests severe deterioration in routine functioning evidenced by repeated and escalating loss of cognitive or volitional control over his or her actions and is not receiving such care as is essential for his or her health or safety;
(21) "Habilitative services" means those services provided by program personnel to assist persons in acquiring and maintaining life skills and in raising their levels of physical, mental, social, and vocational functioning. Habilitative services include education, training for employment, and therapy. The habilitative process shall be undertaken with recognition of the risk to the public safety presented by the person being assisted as manifested by prior charged criminal conduct;
(22) "History of one or more violent acts" refers to the period of time ten years prior to the filing of a petition under this chapter, excluding any time spent, but not any violent acts committed, in a mental health facility, a long-term alcoholism or drug treatment facility, or in confinement as a result of a criminal conviction;
(23) "Imminent" means the state or condition of being likely to occur at any moment or near at hand, rather than distant or remote;
(24) "Individualized service plan" means a plan prepared by a developmental disabilities professional with other professionals as a team, for a person with developmental disabilities, which shall state:
(a) The nature of the person's specific problems, prior charged criminal behavior, and habilitation needs;
(b) The conditions and strategies necessary to achieve the purposes of habilitation;
(c) The intermediate and long-range goals of the habilitation program, with a projected timetable for the attainment;
(d) The rationale for using this plan of habilitation to achieve those intermediate and long-range goals;
(e) The staff responsible for carrying out the plan;
(f) Where relevant in light of past criminal behavior and due consideration for public safety, the criteria for proposed movement to less-restrictive settings, criteria for proposed eventual discharge or release, and a projected possible date for discharge or release; and
(g) The type of residence immediately anticipated for the person and possible future types of residences;
(25) "Information related to mental health services" means all information and records compiled, obtained, or maintained in the course of providing services to either voluntary or involuntary recipients of services by a mental health service provider. This may include documents of legal proceedings under this chapter or chapter 71.34 or 10.77 RCW, or somatic health care information;
(26) "Intoxicated person" means a person whose mental or physical functioning is substantially impaired as a result of the use of alcohol or other psychoactive chemicals;
(27) "In need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment" means that a person, as a result of a mental disorder: (a) Has been committed by a court to detention for involuntary mental health treatment at least twice during the preceding thirty-six months, or, if the person is currently committed for involuntary mental health treatment, the person has been committed to detention for involuntary mental health treatment at least once during the thirty-six months preceding the date of initial detention of the current commitment cycle; (b) is unlikely to voluntarily participate in outpatient treatment without an order for less restrictive alternative treatment, in view of the person's treatment history or current behavior; (c) is unlikely to survive safely in the community without supervision; (d) is likely to benefit from less restrictive alternative treatment; and (e) requires less restrictive alternative treatment to prevent a relapse, decompensation, or deterioration that is likely to result in the person presenting a likelihood of serious harm or the person becoming gravely disabled within a reasonably short period of time. For purposes of (a) of this subsection, time spent in a mental health facility or in confinement as a result of a criminal conviction is excluded from the thirty-six month calculation;
(28) "Judicial commitment" means a commitment by a court pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(29) "Legal counsel" means attorneys and staff employed by county prosecutor offices or the state attorney general acting in their capacity as legal representatives of public mental health and substance use disorder service providers under RCW 71.05.130;
(30) "Less restrictive alternative treatment" means a program of individualized treatment in a less restrictive setting than inpatient treatment that includes the services described in RCW 71.05.585;
(31) "Licensed physician" means a person licensed to practice medicine or osteopathic medicine and surgery in the state of Washington;
(32) "Likelihood of serious harm" means:
(a) A substantial risk that: (i) Physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon his or her own person, as evidenced by threats or attempts to commit suicide or inflict physical harm on oneself; (ii) physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon another, as evidenced by behavior which has caused such harm or which places another person or persons in reasonable fear of sustaining such harm; or (iii) physical harm will be inflicted by a person upon the property of others, as evidenced by behavior which has caused substantial loss or damage to the property of others; or
(b) The person has threatened the physical safety of another and has a history of one or more violent acts;
(33) "Medical clearance" means a physician or other health care provider has determined that a person is medically stable and ready for referral to the designated crisis responder;
(34) "Mental disorder" means any organic, mental, or emotional impairment which has substantial adverse effects on a person's cognitive or volitional functions;
(35) "Mental health professional" means a psychiatrist, psychologist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychiatric nurse, or social worker, and such other mental health professionals as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(36) "Mental health service provider" means a public or private agency that provides mental health services to persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders as defined under this section and receives funding from public sources. This includes, but is not limited to, hospitals licensed under chapter 70.41 RCW, evaluation and treatment facilities as defined in this section, community mental health service delivery systems or behavioral health programs as defined in RCW 71.24.025, facilities conducting competency evaluations and restoration under chapter 10.77 RCW, approved substance use disorder treatment programs as defined in this section, secure detoxification facilities as defined in this section, and correctional facilities operated by state and local governments;
(37) "Peace officer" means a law enforcement official of a public agency or governmental unit, and includes persons specifically given peace officer powers by any state law, local ordinance, or judicial order of appointment;
(38) "Physician assistant" means a person licensed as a physician assistant under chapter 18.57A or 18.71A RCW;
(39) "Private agency" means any person, partnership, corporation, or association that is not a public agency, whether or not financed in whole or in part by public funds, which constitutes an evaluation and treatment facility or private institution, or hospital, or approved substance use disorder treatment program, which is conducted for, or includes a department or ward conducted for, the care and treatment of persons with mental illness, substance use disorders, or both mental illness and substance use disorders;
(40) "Professional person" means a mental health professional or designated crisis responder and shall also mean a physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, registered nurse, and such others as may be defined by rules adopted by the secretary pursuant to the provisions of this chapter;
(41) "Psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner" means a person who is licensed as an advanced registered nurse practitioner pursuant to chapter 18.79 RCW; and who is board certified in advanced practice psychiatric and mental health nursing;
(42) "Psychiatrist" means a person having a license as a physician and surgeon in this state who has in addition completed three years of graduate training in psychiatry in a program approved by the American medical association or the American osteopathic association and is certified or eligible to be certified by the American board of psychiatry and neurology;
(43) "Psychologist" means a person who has been licensed as a psychologist pursuant to chapter 18.83 RCW;
(44) "Public agency" means any evaluation and treatment facility or institution, secure detoxification facility, approved substance use disorder treatment program, or hospital which is conducted for, or includes a department or ward conducted for, the care and treatment of persons with mental illness, substance use disorders, or both mental illness and substance use disorders, if the agency is operated directly by federal, state, county, or municipal government, or a combination of such governments;
(45) "Registration records" include all the records of the department, behavioral health organizations, treatment facilities, and other persons providing services to the department, county departments, or facilities which identify persons who are receiving or who at any time have received services for mental illness or substance use disorders;
(46) "Release" means legal termination of the commitment under the provisions of this chapter;
(47) "Resource management services" has the meaning given in chapter 71.24 RCW;
(48) "Secretary" means the secretary of the department of social and health services, or his or her designee;
(49) "Secure detoxification facility" means a facility operated by either a public or private agency or by the program of an agency that:
(a) Provides for intoxicated persons:
(i) Evaluation and assessment, provided by certified chemical dependency professionals;
(ii) Acute or subacute detoxification services; and
(iii) Discharge assistance provided by certified chemical dependency professionals, including facilitating transitions to appropriate voluntary or involuntary inpatient services or to less restrictive alternatives as appropriate for the individual;
(b) Includes security measures sufficient to protect the patients, staff, and community; and
(c) Is certified as such by the department;
(50) "Serious violent offense" has the same meaning as provided in RCW 9.94A.030;
(51) "Social worker" means a person with a master's or further advanced degree from a social work educational program accredited and approved as provided in RCW 18.320.010;
(52) "Substance use disorder" means a cluster of cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms indicating that an individual continues using the substance despite significant substance-related problems. The diagnosis of a substance use disorder is based on a pathological pattern of behaviors related to the use of the substances;
(53) "Therapeutic court personnel" means the staff of a mental health court or other therapeutic court which has jurisdiction over defendants who are dually diagnosed with mental disorders, including court personnel, probation officers, a court monitor, prosecuting attorney, or defense counsel acting within the scope of therapeutic court duties;
(54) "Treatment records" include registration and all other records concerning persons who are receiving or who at any time have received services for mental illness, which are maintained by the department, by behavioral health organizations and their staffs, and by treatment facilities. Treatment records include mental health information contained in a medical bill including but not limited to mental health drugs, a mental health diagnosis, provider name, and dates of service stemming from a medical service. Treatment records do not include notes or records maintained for personal use by a person providing treatment services for the department, behavioral health organizations, or a treatment facility if the notes or records are not available to others;
(55) "Triage facility" means a short-term facility or a portion of a facility licensed by the department of health and certified by the department of social and health services under RCW 71.24.035, which is designed as a facility to assess and stabilize an individual or determine the need for involuntary commitment of an individual, and must meet department of health residential treatment facility standards. A triage facility may be structured as a voluntary or involuntary placement facility;
(56) "Violent act" means behavior that resulted in homicide, attempted suicide, nonfatal injuries, or substantial damage to property.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: (1) The definitions in this section have been alphabetized pursuant to RCW 1.08.015(2)(k).
(2) This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 1 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 204, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 10 and 14: See note following RCW 71.24.300.
Expiration dates2015 c 269 §§ 9, 13, and 15: See note following RCW 71.24.300.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 250 §§ 2, 15, and 19: "Sections 2, 15, and 19 of this act take effect April 1, 2016." [ 2015 c 250 § 23.]
Expiration date2015 c 250 §§ 1, 14, and 18: "Sections 1, 14, and 18 of this act expire April 1, 2016." [ 2015 c 250 § 22.]
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Certification of triage facilities2011 c 148: "Facilities operating as triage facilities as defined in RCW 71.05.020, whether or not they are certified by the department of social and health services, as of April 22, 2011, are not required to relicense or recertify under any new rules governing licensure or certification of triage facilities. The department of social and health services shall work with the Washington association of counties and the Washington association of sheriffs and police chiefs in creating rules that establish standards for certification of triage facilities. The department of health rules must not require triage facilities to provide twenty-four hour nursing." [ 2011 c 148 § 6.]
Effective date2011 c 148: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [April 22, 2011]." [ 2011 c 148 § 7.]
Effective date2011 c 89: See note following RCW 18.320.005.
Findings2011 c 89: See RCW 18.320.005.
Conflict with federal requirements2009 c 320: "If any part of this act is found to be in conflict with federal requirements that are a prescribed condition to the allocation of federal funds to the state, the conflicting part of this act is inoperative solely to the extent of the conflict and with respect to the agencies directly affected, and this finding does not affect the operation of the remainder of this act in its application to the agencies concerned. Rules adopted under this act must meet federal requirements that are a necessary condition to the receipt of federal funds by the state." [ 2009 c 320 § 6.]
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: "(1) The code reviser shall alphabetize and renumber the definitions, and correct any internal references affected by this act.
(2) The code reviser shall replace all references to "county designated mental health professional" with "designated mental health professional" in the Revised Code of Washington." [ 2005 c 504 § 811.]
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.025
Integration with chapter 71.24 RCW—Behavioral health organizations. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

The legislature intends that the procedures and services authorized in this chapter be integrated with those in chapter 71.24 RCW to the maximum extent necessary to assure a continuum of care to persons with mental illness or who have mental disorders, as defined in either or both this chapter and chapter 71.24 RCW. To this end, behavioral health organizations established in accordance with chapter 71.24 RCW shall institute procedures which require timely consultation with resource management services by designated mental health professionals and evaluation and treatment facilities to assure that determinations to admit, detain, commit, treat, discharge, or release persons with mental disorders under this chapter are made only after appropriate information regarding such person's treatment history and current treatment plan has been sought from resource management services.
NOTES:
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Evaluation of transition to regional systems1989 c 205: See note following RCW 71.24.015.

71.05.025
Integration with chapter 71.24 RCW—Behavioral health organizations. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

The legislature intends that the procedures and services authorized in this chapter be integrated with those in chapter 71.24 RCW to the maximum extent necessary to assure a continuum of care to persons with mental illness or who have mental disorders or substance use disorders, as defined in either or both this chapter and chapter 71.24 RCW. To this end, behavioral health organizations established in accordance with chapter 71.24 RCW shall institute procedures which require timely consultation with resource management services by designated crisis responders, evaluation and treatment facilities, secure detoxification facilities, and approved substance use disorder treatment programs to assure that determinations to admit, detain, commit, treat, discharge, or release persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders under this chapter are made only after appropriate information regarding such person's treatment history and current treatment plan has been sought from resource management services.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Evaluation of transition to regional systems1989 c 205: See note following RCW 71.24.015.



71.05.026
Behavioral health organizations contracts—Limitation on state liability. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Except for monetary damage claims which have been reduced to final judgment by a superior court, this section applies to all claims against the state, state agencies, state officials, or state employees that exist on or arise after March 29, 2006.
(2) Except as expressly provided in contracts entered into between the department and the behavioral health organizations after March 29, 2006, the entities identified in subsection (3) of this section shall have no claim for declaratory relief, injunctive relief, judicial review under chapter 34.05 RCW, or civil liability against the state or state agencies for actions or inactions performed pursuant to the administration of this chapter with regard to the following: (a) The allocation or payment of federal or state funds; (b) the use or allocation of state hospital beds; or (c) financial responsibility for the provision of inpatient mental health care.
(3) This section applies to counties, behavioral health organizations, and entities which contract to provide behavioral health organization services and their subcontractors, agents, or employees.
NOTES:
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.

71.05.026
Behavioral health organizations contracts—Limitation on state liability. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Except for monetary damage claims which have been reduced to final judgment by a superior court, this section applies to all claims against the state, state agencies, state officials, or state employees that exist on or arise after March 29, 2006.
(2) Except as expressly provided in contracts entered into between the department and the behavioral health organizations after March 29, 2006, the entities identified in subsection (3) of this section shall have no claim for declaratory relief, injunctive relief, judicial review under chapter 34.05 RCW, or civil liability against the state or state agencies for actions or inactions performed pursuant to the administration of this chapter with regard to the following: (a) The allocation or payment of federal or state funds; (b) the use or allocation of state hospital beds; or (c) financial responsibility for the provision of inpatient mental health care or inpatient substance use disorder treatment.
(3) This section applies to counties, behavioral health organizations, and entities which contract to provide behavioral health organization services and their subcontractors, agents, or employees.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.



71.05.027
Integrated comprehensive screening and assessment for chemical dependency and mental disorders.

(1) Not later than January 1, 2007, all persons providing treatment under this chapter shall also implement the integrated comprehensive screening and assessment process for chemical dependency and mental disorders adopted pursuant to *RCW 70.96C.010 and shall document the numbers of clients with co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders based on a quadrant system of low and high needs.
(2) Treatment providers and behavioral health organizations who fail to implement the integrated comprehensive screening and assessment process for chemical dependency and mental disorders by July 1, 2007, shall be subject to contractual penalties established under *RCW 70.96C.010.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 70.96C.010 was recodified as RCW 71.24.630 pursuant to 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 701.
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
FindingsIntent2005 c 504: "The legislature finds that persons with mental disorders, chemical dependency disorders, or co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders are disproportionately more likely to be confined in a correctional institution, become homeless, become involved with child protective services or involved in a dependency proceeding, or lose those state and federal benefits to which they may be entitled as a result of their disorders. The legislature finds that prior state policy of addressing mental health and chemical dependency in isolation from each other has not been cost-effective and has often resulted in longer-term, more costly treatment that may be less effective over time. The legislature finds that a substantial number of persons have co-occurring mental and substance abuse disorders and that identification and integrated treatment of co-occurring disorders is critical to successful outcomes and recovery. Consequently, the legislature intends, to the extent of available funding, to:
(1) Establish a process for determining which persons with mental disorders and substance abuse disorders have co-occurring disorders;
(2) Reduce the gap between available chemical dependency treatment and the documented need for treatment;
(3) Improve treatment outcomes by shifting treatment, where possible, to evidence-based, research-based, and consensus-based treatment practices and by removing barriers to the use of those practices;
(4) Expand the authority for and use of therapeutic courts including drug courts, mental health courts, and therapeutic courts for dependency proceedings;
(5) Improve access to treatment for persons who are not enrolled in medicaid by improving and creating consistency in the application processes, and by minimizing the numbers of eligible confined persons who leave confinement without medical assistance;
(6) Improve access to inpatient treatment by creating expanded services facilities for persons needing intensive treatment in a secure setting who do not need inpatient care, but are unable to access treatment under current licensing restrictions in other settings;
(7) Establish secure detoxification centers for persons involuntarily detained as gravely disabled or presenting a likelihood of serious harm due to chemical dependency and authorize combined crisis responders for both mental disorders and chemical dependency disorders on a pilot basis and study the outcomes;
(8) Slow or stop the loss of inpatient and intensive residential beds and children's long-term inpatient placements and refine the balance of state hospital and community inpatient and residential beds;
(9) Improve cross-system collaboration including collaboration with first responders and hospital emergency rooms, schools, primary care, developmental disabilities, law enforcement and corrections, and federally funded and licensed programs;
(10) Following the receipt of outcomes from the pilot programs in Part II of this act, if directed by future legislative enactment, implement a single, comprehensive, involuntary treatment act with a unified set of standards, rights, obligations, and procedures for adults and children with mental disorders, chemical dependency disorders, and co-occurring disorders; and
(11) Amend existing state law to address organizational and structural barriers to effective use of state funds for treating persons with mental and substance abuse disorders, minimize internal inconsistencies, clarify policy and requirements, and maximize the opportunity for effective and cost-effective outcomes." [ 2005 c 504 § 101.]
Severability2005 c 504: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 2005 c 504 § 807.]
ApplicationConstruction2005 c 504: "This act shall be so applied and construed as to effectuate its general purpose to make uniform the law with respect to the subject of this act among those states which enact it." [ 2005 c 504 § 808.]
Captions, part headings, subheadings not law2005 c 504: "Captions, part headings, and subheadings used in this act are not part of the law." [ 2005 c 504 § 809.]
Adoption of rules2005 c 504: "(1) The secretary of the department of social and health services may adopt rules as necessary to implement the provisions of this act.
(2) The secretary of corrections may adopt rules as necessary to implement the provisions of this act." [ 2005 c 504 § 812.]
Effective dates2005 c 504: "(1) Except for section 503 of this act, this act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect July 1, 2005.
(2) Section 503 of this act takes effect July 1, 2006." [ 2005 c 504 § 813.]
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.



71.05.030
Commitment laws applicable.

Persons suffering from a mental disorder may not be involuntarily committed for treatment of such disorder except pursuant to provisions of this chapter, chapter 10.77 RCW, chapter 71.06 RCW, chapter 71.34 RCW, transfer pursuant to RCW 72.68.031 through 72.68.037, or pursuant to court ordered evaluation and treatment not to exceed ninety days pending a criminal trial or sentencing.
NOTES:
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date1985 c 354: See RCW 71.34.901.



71.05.032
Joinder of petitions for commitment. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

A petition for commitment under this chapter may be joined with a petition for commitment under chapter 70.96A RCW.
NOTES:
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.



71.05.040
Detention or judicial commitment of persons with developmental disabilities, impaired by chronic alcoholism or drug abuse, or suffering from dementia.

Persons who are developmentally disabled, impaired by chronic alcoholism or drug abuse, or suffering from dementia shall not be detained for evaluation and treatment or judicially committed solely by reason of that condition unless such condition causes a person to be gravely disabled or as a result of a mental disorder such condition exists that constitutes a likelihood of serious harm: Provided however, That persons who are developmentally disabled, impaired by chronic alcoholism or drug abuse, or suffering from dementia and who otherwise meet the criteria for detention or judicial commitment are not ineligible for detention or commitment based on this condition alone.
NOTES:
Severability2004 c 166: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 2004 c 166 § 23.]
Effective dates2004 c 166: "This act takes effect July 1, 2004, except for sections 6, 20, and 22 of this act, which are necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and take effect immediately [March 26, 2004]." [ 2004 c 166 § 24.]
PurposeIntentSeverability1977 ex.s. c 80: See notes following RCW 4.16.190.



71.05.050
Voluntary application for mental health services—Rights—Review of condition and status—Detention—Person refusing voluntary admission, temporary detention. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to limit the right of any person to apply voluntarily to any public or private agency or practitioner for treatment of a mental disorder, either by direct application or by referral. Any person voluntarily admitted for inpatient treatment to any public or private agency shall be released immediately upon his or her request. Any person voluntarily admitted for inpatient treatment to any public or private agency shall orally be advised of the right to immediate discharge, and further advised of such rights in writing as are secured to them pursuant to this chapter and their rights of access to attorneys, courts, and other legal redress. Their condition and status shall be reviewed at least once each one hundred eighty days for evaluation as to the need for further treatment or possible discharge, at which time they shall again be advised of their right to discharge upon request.
(2) If the professional staff of any public or private agency or hospital regards a person voluntarily admitted who requests discharge as presenting, as a result of a mental disorder, an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, they may detain such person for sufficient time to notify the designated mental health professional of such person's condition to enable the designated mental health professional to authorize such person being further held in custody or transported to an evaluation and treatment center pursuant to the provisions of this chapter, which shall in ordinary circumstances be no later than the next judicial day.
(3) If a person is brought to the emergency room of a public or private agency or hospital for observation or treatment, the person refuses voluntary admission, and the professional staff of the public or private agency or hospital regard such person as presenting as a result of a mental disorder an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or as presenting an imminent danger because of grave disability, they may detain such person for sufficient time to notify the designated mental health professional of such person's condition to enable the designated mental health professional to authorize such person being further held in custody or transported to an evaluation treatment center pursuant to the conditions in this chapter, but which time shall be no more than six hours from the time the professional staff notify the designated mental health professional of the need for evaluation, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance.
(4) Dismissal of a commitment petition is not the appropriate remedy for a violation of the timeliness requirements of this section based on the intent of this chapter under RCW 71.05.010 except in the few cases where the facility staff or designated mental health professional has totally disregarded the requirements of this section.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.050
Voluntary application for mental disorder or substance use disorder treatment—Rights—Review of condition and status—Detention—Person refusing voluntary admission, temporary detention. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Nothing in this chapter shall be construed to limit the right of any person to apply voluntarily to any public or private agency or practitioner for treatment of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, either by direct application or by referral. Any person voluntarily admitted for inpatient treatment to any public or private agency shall be released immediately upon his or her request. Any person voluntarily admitted for inpatient treatment to any public or private agency shall orally be advised of the right to immediate discharge, and further advised of such rights in writing as are secured to them pursuant to this chapter and their rights of access to attorneys, courts, and other legal redress. Their condition and status shall be reviewed at least once each one hundred eighty days for evaluation as to the need for further treatment or possible discharge, at which time they shall again be advised of their right to discharge upon request.
(2) If the professional staff of any public or private agency or hospital regards a person voluntarily admitted who requests discharge as presenting, as a result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, they may detain such person for sufficient time to notify the designated crisis responder of such person's condition to enable the designated crisis responder to authorize such person being further held in custody or transported to an evaluation and treatment center, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program pursuant to the provisions of this chapter, which shall in ordinary circumstances be no later than the next judicial day.
(3) If a person is brought to the emergency room of a public or private agency or hospital for observation or treatment, the person refuses voluntary admission, and the professional staff of the public or private agency or hospital regard such person as presenting as a result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or as presenting an imminent danger because of grave disability, they may detain such person for sufficient time to notify the designated crisis responder of such person's condition to enable the designated crisis responder to authorize such person being further held in custody or transported to an evaluation treatment center, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program pursuant to the conditions in this chapter, but which time shall be no more than six hours from the time the professional staff notify the designated crisis responder of the need for evaluation, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance.
(4) Dismissal of a commitment petition is not the appropriate remedy for a violation of the timeliness requirements of this section based on the intent of this chapter under RCW 71.05.010 except in the few cases where the facility staff or designated crisis responder has totally disregarded the requirements of this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.100
Financial responsibility.

In addition to the responsibility provided for by RCW 43.20B.330, any person, or his or her estate, or his or her spouse, or the parents of a minor person who is involuntarily detained pursuant to this chapter for the purpose of treatment and evaluation outside of a facility maintained and operated by the department shall be responsible for the cost of such care and treatment. In the event that an individual is unable to pay for such treatment or in the event payment would result in a substantial hardship upon the individual or his or her family, then the county of residence of such person shall be responsible for such costs. If it is not possible to determine the county of residence of the person, the cost shall be borne by the county where the person was originally detained. The department shall, pursuant to chapter 34.05 RCW, adopt standards as to (1) inability to pay in whole or in part, (2) a definition of substantial hardship, and (3) appropriate payment schedules. Such standards shall be applicable to all county mental health administrative boards. Financial responsibility with respect to department services and facilities shall continue to be as provided in RCW 43.20B.320 through 43.20B.360 and 43.20B.370.
NOTES:
Savings1987 c 75: See RCW 43.20B.900.



71.05.110
Compensation of appointed counsel.

Attorneys appointed for persons pursuant to this chapter shall be compensated for their services as follows: (1) The person for whom an attorney is appointed shall, if he or she is financially able pursuant to standards as to financial capability and indigency set by the superior court of the county in which the proceeding is held, bear the costs of such legal services; (2) if such person is indigent pursuant to such standards, the behavioral health organization shall reimburse the county in which the proceeding is held for the direct costs of such legal services, as provided in RCW 71.05.730.
NOTES:
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
IntentEffective date2011 c 343: See notes following RCW 71.05.730.



71.05.120
Exemptions from liability. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) No officer of a public or private agency, nor the superintendent, professional person in charge, his or her professional designee, or attending staff of any such agency, nor any public official performing functions necessary to the administration of this chapter, nor peace officer responsible for detaining a person pursuant to this chapter, nor any *county designated mental health professional, nor the state, a unit of local government, or an evaluation and treatment facility shall be civilly or criminally liable for performing duties pursuant to this chapter with regard to the decision of whether to admit, discharge, release, administer antipsychotic medications, or detain a person for evaluation and treatment: PROVIDED, That such duties were performed in good faith and without gross negligence.
(2) Peace officers and their employing agencies are not liable for the referral of a person, or the failure to refer a person, to a mental health agency pursuant to a policy adopted pursuant to RCW 71.05.457 if such action or inaction is taken in good faith and without gross negligence.
(3) This section does not relieve a person from giving the required notices under RCW 71.05.330(2) or 71.05.340(1)(b), or the duty to warn or to take reasonable precautions to provide protection from violent behavior where the patient has communicated an actual threat of physical violence against a reasonably identifiable victim or victims. The duty to warn or to take reasonable precautions to provide protection from violent behavior is discharged if reasonable efforts are made to communicate the threat to the victim or victims and to law enforcement personnel.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: The term "county designated mental health professional" as defined in RCW 71.05.020 was changed to "designated mental health professional" by 2005 c 504 § 104.
FindingIntent2016 c 158: See note following RCW 71.05.455.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.

71.05.120
Exemptions from liability. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) No officer of a public or private agency, nor the superintendent, professional person in charge, his or her professional designee, or attending staff of any such agency, nor any public official performing functions necessary to the administration of this chapter, nor peace officer responsible for detaining a person pursuant to this chapter, nor any designated crisis responder, nor the state, a unit of local government, an evaluation and treatment facility, a secure detoxification facility, or an approved substance use disorder treatment program shall be civilly or criminally liable for performing duties pursuant to this chapter with regard to the decision of whether to admit, discharge, release, administer antipsychotic medications, or detain a person for evaluation and treatment: PROVIDED, That such duties were performed in good faith and without gross negligence.
(2) Peace officers and their employing agencies are not liable for the referral of a person, or the failure to refer a person, to a mental health agency pursuant to a policy adopted pursuant to RCW 71.05.457 if such action or inaction is taken in good faith and without gross negligence.
(3) This section does not relieve a person from giving the required notices under RCW 71.05.330(2) or 71.05.340(1)(b), or the duty to warn or to take reasonable precautions to provide protection from violent behavior where the patient has communicated an actual threat of physical violence against a reasonably identifiable victim or victims. The duty to warn or to take reasonable precautions to provide protection from violent behavior is discharged if reasonable efforts are made to communicate the threat to the victim or victims and to law enforcement personnel.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 158 § 4 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 208, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingIntent2016 c 158: See note following RCW 71.05.455.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.



71.05.130
Duties of prosecuting attorney and attorney general.

In any judicial proceeding for involuntary commitment or detention except under RCW 71.05.201, or in any proceeding challenging involuntary commitment or detention, the prosecuting attorney for the county in which the proceeding was initiated shall represent the individuals or agencies petitioning for commitment or detention and shall defend all challenges to such commitment or detention, except that the attorney general shall represent and provide legal services and advice to state hospitals or institutions with regard to all provisions of and proceedings under this chapter other than proceedings initiated by such hospitals and institutions seeking fourteen day detention.
NOTES:
Short title2015 c 258: See note following RCW 71.05.201.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.



71.05.132
Court-ordered treatment—Required notifications. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

When any court orders a person to receive treatment under this chapter, the order shall include a statement that if the person is, or becomes, subject to supervision by the department of corrections, the person must notify the treatment provider and the person's mental health treatment information must be shared with the department of corrections for the duration of the offender's incarceration and supervision, under RCW 71.05.445. Upon a petition by a person who does not have a history of one or more violent acts, the court may, for good cause, find that public safety would not be enhanced by the sharing of this person's information.
NOTES:
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.

71.05.132
Court-ordered treatment—Required notifications. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

When any court orders a person to receive treatment under this chapter, the order shall include a statement that if the person is, or becomes, subject to supervision by the department of corrections, the person must notify the treatment provider and the person's mental health treatment information and substance use disorder treatment information must be shared with the department of corrections for the duration of the offender's incarceration and supervision, under RCW 71.05.445. Upon a petition by a person who does not have a history of one or more violent acts, the court may, for good cause, find that public safety would not be enhanced by the sharing of this person's information.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.



71.05.135
Mental health commissioners—Appointment.

In each county the superior court may appoint the following persons to assist the superior court in disposing of its business: PROVIDED, That such positions may not be created without prior consent of the county legislative authority:
(1) One or more attorneys to act as mental health commissioners; and
(2) Such investigators, stenographers, and clerks as the court shall find necessary to carry on the work of the mental health commissioners.
The appointments provided for in this section shall be made by a majority vote of the judges of the superior court of the county and may be in addition to all other appointments of commissioners and other judicial attaches otherwise authorized by law. Mental health commissioners and investigators shall serve at the pleasure of the judges appointing them and shall receive such compensation as the county legislative authority shall determine. The appointments may be full or part-time positions. A person appointed as a mental health commissioner may also be appointed to any other commissioner position authorized by law.
NOTES:
Effective date1993 c 15: See note following RCW 26.12.050.
PurposeCaptions not law1991 c 363: See notes following RCW 2.32.180.
Severability1989 c 174: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1989 c 174 § 4.]



71.05.137
Mental health commissioners—Authority.

The judges of the superior court of the county by majority vote may authorize mental health commissioners, appointed pursuant to RCW 71.05.135, to perform any or all of the following duties:
(1) Receive all applications, petitions, and proceedings filed in the superior court for the purpose of disposing of them pursuant to this chapter or RCW 10.77.094;
(2) Investigate the facts upon which to base warrants, subpoenas, orders to directions in actions, or proceedings filed pursuant to this chapter or RCW 10.77.094;
(3) For the purpose of this chapter, exercise all powers and perform all the duties of a court commissioner appointed pursuant to RCW 2.24.010;
(4) Hold hearings in proceedings under this chapter or RCW 10.77.094 and make written reports of all proceedings under this chapter or RCW 10.77.094 which shall become a part of the record of superior court;
(5) Provide such supervision in connection with the exercise of its jurisdiction as may be ordered by the presiding judge; and
(6) Cause the orders and findings to be entered in the same manner as orders and findings are entered in cases in the superior court.
NOTES:
Severability1989 c 174: See note following RCW 71.05.135.



71.05.140
Records maintained.

A record of all applications, petitions, and proceedings under this chapter shall be maintained by the county clerk in which the application, petition, or proceeding was initiated.



71.05.145
Offenders with mental illness who are believed to be dangerous—Less restrictive alternative.

The legislature intends that, when evaluating a person who is identified under RCW 72.09.370(7), the professional person at the evaluation and treatment facility shall, when appropriate after consideration of the person's mental condition and relevant public safety concerns, file a petition for a ninety-day less restrictive alternative in lieu of a petition for a fourteen-day commitment.
NOTES:
IntentEffective date1999 c 214: See notes following RCW 72.09.370.



71.05.150
Detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of persons with mental disorders—Procedure. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) When a designated mental health professional receives information alleging that a person, as a result of a mental disorder: (i) Presents a likelihood of serious harm; (ii) is gravely disabled; or (iii) is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment; the designated mental health professional may, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of any person providing information to initiate detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, if satisfied that the allegations are true and that the person will not voluntarily seek appropriate treatment, file a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. If the petition is filed solely on the grounds that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, the petition may only be for an involuntary outpatient evaluation. An involuntary outpatient evaluation may be conducted by any combination of licensed professionals authorized to petition for involuntary commitment under RCW 71.05.230 and must include involvement or consultation with the agency or facility which will provide monitoring or services under the proposed less restrictive alternative treatment order. If the petition is for an involuntary outpatient evaluation and the person is being held in a hospital emergency department, the person may be released once the hospital has satisfied federal and state legal requirements for appropriate screening and stabilization of patients.
(b) Before filing the petition, the designated mental health professional must personally interview the person, unless the person refuses an interview, and determine whether the person will voluntarily receive appropriate evaluation and treatment at an evaluation and treatment facility, crisis stabilization unit, or triage facility.
(2)(a) An order to detain to a designated evaluation and treatment facility for not more than a seventy-two-hour evaluation and treatment period, or an order for an involuntary outpatient evaluation, may be issued by a judge of the superior court upon request of a designated mental health professional, whenever it appears to the satisfaction of a judge of the superior court:
(i) That there is probable cause to support the petition; and
(ii) That the person has refused or failed to accept appropriate evaluation and treatment voluntarily.
(b) The petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, signed under penalty of perjury, or sworn telephonic testimony may be considered by the court in determining whether there are sufficient grounds for issuing the order.
(c) The order shall designate retained counsel or, if counsel is appointed from a list provided by the court, the name, business address, and telephone number of the attorney appointed to represent the person.
(3) The designated mental health professional shall then serve or cause to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the order together with a notice of rights, and a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. After service on such person the designated mental health professional shall file the return of service in court and provide copies of all papers in the court file to the evaluation and treatment facility and the designated attorney. The designated mental health professional shall notify the court and the prosecuting attorney that a probable cause hearing will be held within seventy-two hours of the date and time of outpatient evaluation or admission to the evaluation and treatment facility. The person shall be permitted to be accompanied by one or more of his or her relatives, friends, an attorney, a personal physician, or other professional or religious advisor to the place of evaluation. An attorney accompanying the person to the place of evaluation shall be permitted to be present during the admission evaluation. Any other individual accompanying the person may be present during the admission evaluation. The facility may exclude the individual if his or her presence would present a safety risk, delay the proceedings, or otherwise interfere with the evaluation.
(4) The designated mental health professional may notify a peace officer to take such person or cause such person to be taken into custody and placed in an evaluation and treatment facility. At the time such person is taken into custody there shall commence to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the original order together with a notice of rights and a petition for initial detention.
NOTES:
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.150
Detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders—Procedure. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1)(a) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as a result of a mental disorder, substance use disorder, or both presents a likelihood of serious harm or is gravely disabled, or that a person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment; the designated crisis responder may, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of any person providing information to initiate detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, if satisfied that the allegations are true and that the person will not voluntarily seek appropriate treatment, file a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. If the petition is filed solely on the grounds that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, the petition may only be for an involuntary outpatient evaluation. An involuntary outpatient evaluation may be conducted by any combination of licensed professionals authorized to petition for involuntary commitment under RCW 71.05.230 and must include involvement or consultation with the agency or facility which will provide monitoring or services under the proposed less restrictive alternative treatment order. If the petition is for an involuntary outpatient evaluation and the person is being held in a hospital emergency department, the person may be released once the hospital has satisfied federal and state legal requirements for appropriate screening and stabilization of patients.
(b) Before filing the petition, the designated crisis responder must personally interview the person, unless the person refuses an interview, and determine whether the person will voluntarily receive appropriate evaluation and treatment at an evaluation and treatment facility, crisis stabilization unit, triage facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program.
(2)(a) An order to detain a person with a mental disorder to a designated evaluation and treatment facility, or to detain a person with a substance use disorder to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program, for not more than a seventy-two-hour evaluation and treatment period, or an order for an involuntary outpatient evaluation, may be issued by a judge of the superior court upon request of a designated crisis responder, subject to (d) of this subsection, whenever it appears to the satisfaction of a judge of the superior court:
(i) That there is probable cause to support the petition; and
(ii) That the person has refused or failed to accept appropriate evaluation and treatment voluntarily.
(b) The petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, signed under penalty of perjury, or sworn telephonic testimony may be considered by the court in determining whether there are sufficient grounds for issuing the order.
(c) The order shall designate retained counsel or, if counsel is appointed from a list provided by the court, the name, business address, and telephone number of the attorney appointed to represent the person.
(d) A court may not issue an order to detain a person to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program unless there is an available secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program that has adequate space for the person.
(3) The designated crisis responder shall then serve or cause to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the order together with a notice of rights, and a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. After service on such person the designated crisis responder shall file the return of service in court and provide copies of all papers in the court file to the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program, and the designated attorney. The designated crisis responder shall notify the court and the prosecuting attorney that a probable cause hearing will be held within seventy-two hours of the date and time of outpatient evaluation or admission to the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program. The person shall be permitted to be accompanied by one or more of his or her relatives, friends, an attorney, a personal physician, or other professional or religious advisor to the place of evaluation. An attorney accompanying the person to the place of evaluation shall be permitted to be present during the admission evaluation. Any other individual accompanying the person may be present during the admission evaluation. The facility may exclude the individual if his or her presence would present a safety risk, delay the proceedings, or otherwise interfere with the evaluation.
(4) The designated crisis responder may notify a peace officer to take such person or cause such person to be taken into custody and placed in an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program. At the time such person is taken into custody there shall commence to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the original order together with a notice of rights and a petition for initial detention.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.150
Detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders—Procedure. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1)(a) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as a result of a mental disorder, substance use disorder, or both presents a likelihood of serious harm or is gravely disabled, or that a person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment; the designated crisis responder may, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of any person providing information to initiate detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, if satisfied that the allegations are true and that the person will not voluntarily seek appropriate treatment, file a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. If the petition is filed solely on the grounds that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, the petition may only be for an involuntary outpatient evaluation. An involuntary outpatient evaluation may be conducted by any combination of licensed professionals authorized to petition for involuntary commitment under RCW 71.05.230 and must include involvement or consultation with the agency or facility which will provide monitoring or services under the proposed less restrictive alternative treatment order. If the petition is for an involuntary outpatient evaluation and the person is being held in a hospital emergency department, the person may be released once the hospital has satisfied federal and state legal requirements for appropriate screening and stabilization of patients.
(b) Before filing the petition, the designated crisis responder must personally interview the person, unless the person refuses an interview, and determine whether the person will voluntarily receive appropriate evaluation and treatment at an evaluation and treatment facility, crisis stabilization unit, triage facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program.
(2)(a) An order to detain a person with a mental disorder to a designated evaluation and treatment facility, or to detain a person with a substance use disorder to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program, for not more than a seventy-two-hour evaluation and treatment period, or an order for an involuntary outpatient evaluation, may be issued by a judge of the superior court upon request of a designated crisis responder whenever it appears to the satisfaction of a judge of the superior court:
(i) That there is probable cause to support the petition; and
(ii) That the person has refused or failed to accept appropriate evaluation and treatment voluntarily.
(b) The petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation, signed under penalty of perjury, or sworn telephonic testimony may be considered by the court in determining whether there are sufficient grounds for issuing the order.
(c) The order shall designate retained counsel or, if counsel is appointed from a list provided by the court, the name, business address, and telephone number of the attorney appointed to represent the person.
(3) The designated crisis responder shall then serve or cause to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the order together with a notice of rights, and a petition for initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation. After service on such person the designated crisis responder shall file the return of service in court and provide copies of all papers in the court file to the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program, and the designated attorney. The designated crisis responder shall notify the court and the prosecuting attorney that a probable cause hearing will be held within seventy-two hours of the date and time of outpatient evaluation or admission to the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program. The person shall be permitted to be accompanied by one or more of his or her relatives, friends, an attorney, a personal physician, or other professional or religious advisor to the place of evaluation. An attorney accompanying the person to the place of evaluation shall be permitted to be present during the admission evaluation. Any other individual accompanying the person may be present during the admission evaluation. The facility may exclude the individual if his or her presence would present a safety risk, delay the proceedings, or otherwise interfere with the evaluation.
(4) The designated crisis responder may notify a peace officer to take such person or cause such person to be taken into custody and placed in an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program. At the time such person is taken into custody there shall commence to be served on such person, his or her guardian, and conservator, if any, a copy of the original order together with a notice of rights and a petition for initial detention.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.153
Emergency detention of persons with mental disorders—Procedure. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) When a designated mental health professional receives information alleging that a person, as the result of a mental disorder, presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of the person or persons providing the information if any, the designated mental health professional may take such person, or cause by oral or written order such person to be taken into emergency custody in an evaluation and treatment facility for not more than seventy-two hours as described in RCW 71.05.180.
(2) A peace officer may take or cause such person to be taken into custody and immediately delivered to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, or the emergency department of a local hospital under the following circumstances:
(a) Pursuant to subsection (1) of this section; or
(b) When he or she has reasonable cause to believe that such person is suffering from a mental disorder and presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled.
(3) Persons delivered to a crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, emergency department of a local hospital, or triage facility that has elected to operate as an involuntary facility by peace officers pursuant to subsection (2) of this section may be held by the facility for a period of up to twelve hours, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance.
(4) Within three hours after arrival, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the person must be examined by a mental health professional. Within twelve hours of notice of the need for evaluation, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the designated mental health professional must determine whether the individual meets detention criteria. If the individual is detained, the designated mental health professional shall file a petition for detention or a supplemental petition as appropriate and commence service on the designated attorney for the detained person. If the individual is released to the community, the mental health provider shall inform the peace officer of the release within a reasonable period of time after the release if the peace officer has specifically requested notification and provided contact information to the provider.
(5) Dismissal of a commitment petition is not the appropriate remedy for a violation of the timeliness requirements of this section based on the intent of this chapter under RCW 71.05.010 except in the few cases where the facility staff or designated mental health professional has totally disregarded the requirements of this section.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.

71.05.153
Emergency detention of persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders—Procedure. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as the result of a mental disorder, presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of the person or persons providing the information if any, the designated crisis responder may take such person, or cause by oral or written order such person to be taken into emergency custody in an evaluation and treatment facility for not more than seventy-two hours as described in RCW 71.05.180.
(2) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as the result of substance use disorder, presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of the person or persons providing the information if any, the designated crisis responder may take the person, or cause by oral or written order the person to be taken, into emergency custody in a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program for not more than seventy-two hours as described in RCW 71.05.180, if a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program is available and has adequate space for the person.
(3)(a) Subject to (b) of this subsection, a peace officer may take or cause such person to be taken into custody and immediately delivered to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, approved substance use disorder treatment program, or the emergency department of a local hospital under the following circumstances:
(i) Pursuant to subsection (1) or (2) of this section; or
(ii) When he or she has reasonable cause to believe that such person is suffering from a mental disorder or substance use disorder and presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled.
(b) A peace officer's delivery of a person, based on a substance use disorder, to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program is subject to the availability of a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program with adequate space for the person.
(4) Persons delivered to a crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, emergency department of a local hospital, triage facility that has elected to operate as an involuntary facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program by peace officers pursuant to subsection (3) of this section may be held by the facility for a period of up to twelve hours, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance.
(5) Within three hours after arrival, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the person must be examined by a mental health professional. Within twelve hours of notice of the need for evaluation, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the designated crisis responder must determine whether the individual meets detention criteria. If the individual is detained, the designated crisis responder shall file a petition for detention or a supplemental petition as appropriate and commence service on the designated attorney for the detained person. If the individual is released to the community, the mental health service provider shall inform the peace officer of the release within a reasonable period of time after the release if the peace officer has specifically requested notification and provided contact information to the provider.
(6) Dismissal of a commitment petition is not the appropriate remedy for a violation of the timeliness requirements of this section based on the intent of this chapter under RCW 71.05.010 except in the few cases where the facility staff or designated mental health professional has totally disregarded the requirements of this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.

71.05.153
Emergency detention of persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders—Procedure. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as the result of a mental disorder, presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of the person or persons providing the information if any, the designated crisis responder may take such person, or cause by oral or written order such person to be taken into emergency custody in an evaluation and treatment facility for not more than seventy-two hours as described in RCW 71.05.180.
(2) When a designated crisis responder receives information alleging that a person, as the result of substance use disorder, presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled, after investigation and evaluation of the specific facts alleged and of the reliability and credibility of the person or persons providing the information if any, the designated crisis responder may take the person, or cause by oral or written order the person to be taken, into emergency custody in a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program for not more than seventy-two hours as described in RCW 71.05.180.
(3) A peace officer may take or cause such person to be taken into custody and immediately delivered to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, approved substance use disorder treatment program, or the emergency department of a local hospital under the following circumstances:
(a) Pursuant to subsection (1) or (2) of this section; or
(b) When he or she has reasonable cause to believe that such person is suffering from a mental disorder or substance use disorder and presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm or is in imminent danger because of being gravely disabled.
(4) Persons delivered to a crisis stabilization unit, evaluation and treatment facility, emergency department of a local hospital, triage facility that has elected to operate as an involuntary facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program by peace officers pursuant to subsection (3) of this section may be held by the facility for a period of up to twelve hours, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance.
(5) Within three hours after arrival, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the person must be examined by a mental health professional. Within twelve hours of notice of the need for evaluation, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, the designated crisis responder must determine whether the individual meets detention criteria. If the individual is detained, the designated crisis responder shall file a petition for detention or a supplemental petition as appropriate and commence service on the designated attorney for the detained person. If the individual is released to the community, the mental health service provider shall inform the peace officer of the release within a reasonable period of time after the release if the peace officer has specifically requested notification and provided contact information to the provider.
(6) Dismissal of a commitment petition is not the appropriate remedy for a violation of the timeliness requirements of this section based on the intent of this chapter under RCW 71.05.010 except in the few cases where the facility staff or designated mental health professional has totally disregarded the requirements of this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.
Certification of triage facilitiesEffective date2011 c 148: See notes following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Captions not law2007 c 375: See note following RCW 10.77.084.



71.05.154
Detention of persons with mental disorders—Evaluation—Consultation with emergency room physician. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

A designated mental health professional conducting an evaluation of a person under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 must consult with any examining emergency room physician regarding the physician's observations and opinions relating to the person's condition, and whether, in the view of the physician, detention is appropriate. The designated mental health professional shall take serious consideration of observations and opinions by examining emergency room physicians in determining whether detention under this chapter is appropriate. The designated mental health professional must document the consultation with an examining emergency room physician, including the physician's observations or opinions regarding whether detention of the person is appropriate.

71.05.154
Detention of persons with mental disorders or substance use disorders—Evaluation—Consultation with emergency room physician. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

A designated crisis responder conducting an evaluation of a person under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 must consult with any examining emergency room physician regarding the physician's observations and opinions relating to the person's condition, and whether, in the view of the physician, detention is appropriate. The designated crisis responder shall take serious consideration of observations and opinions by examining emergency room physicians in determining whether detention under this chapter is appropriate. The designated crisis responder must document the consultation with an examining emergency room physician, including the physician's observations or opinions regarding whether detention of the person is appropriate.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.156
Evaluation—Individual with grave disability. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

A designated mental health professional who conducts an evaluation for imminent likelihood of serious harm or imminent danger because of being gravely disabled under RCW 71.05.153 must also evaluate the person under RCW 71.05.150 for likelihood of serious harm or grave disability that does not meet the imminent standard for emergency detention, and to determine whether the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.

71.05.156
Evaluation—Individual with grave disability. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

A designated crisis responder who conducts an evaluation for imminent likelihood of serious harm or imminent danger because of being gravely disabled under RCW 71.05.153 must also evaluate the person under RCW 71.05.150 for likelihood of serious harm or grave disability that does not meet the imminent standard for emergency detention, and to determine whether the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.157
Evaluation by designated mental health professional—When required—Required notifications. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) When a designated mental health professional is notified by a jail that a defendant or offender who was subject to a discharge review under RCW 71.05.232 is to be released to the community, the designated mental health professional shall evaluate the person within seventy-two hours of release.
(2) When an offender is under court-ordered treatment in the community and the supervision of the department of corrections, and the treatment provider becomes aware that the person is in violation of the terms of the court order, the treatment provider shall notify the designated mental health professional and the department of corrections of the violation and request an evaluation for purposes of revocation of the less restrictive alternative.
(3) When a designated mental health professional becomes aware that an offender who is under court-ordered treatment in the community and the supervision of the department of corrections is in violation of a treatment order or a condition of supervision that relates to public safety, or the designated mental health professional detains a person under this chapter, the designated mental health professional shall notify the person's treatment provider and the department of corrections.
(4) When an offender who is confined in a state correctional facility or is under supervision of the department of corrections in the community is subject to a petition for involuntary treatment under this chapter, the petitioner shall notify the department of corrections and the department of corrections shall provide documentation of its risk assessment or other concerns to the petitioner and the court if the department of corrections classified the offender as a high risk or high needs offender.
(5) Nothing in this section creates a duty on any treatment provider or designated mental health professional to provide offender supervision.
(6) No jail or state correctional facility may be considered a less restrictive alternative to an evaluation and treatment facility.
NOTES:
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.

71.05.157
Evaluation by designated crisis responder—When required—Required notifications. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) When a designated crisis responder is notified by a jail that a defendant or offender who was subject to a discharge review under RCW 71.05.232 is to be released to the community, the designated crisis responder shall evaluate the person within seventy-two hours of release.
(2) When an offender is under court-ordered treatment in the community and the supervision of the department of corrections, and the treatment provider becomes aware that the person is in violation of the terms of the court order, the treatment provider shall notify the designated crisis responder and the department of corrections of the violation and request an evaluation for purposes of revocation of the less restrictive alternative.
(3) When a designated crisis responder becomes aware that an offender who is under court-ordered treatment in the community and the supervision of the department of corrections is in violation of a treatment order or a condition of supervision that relates to public safety, or the designated crisis responder detains a person under this chapter, the designated crisis responder shall notify the person's treatment provider and the department of corrections.
(4) When an offender who is confined in a state correctional facility or is under supervision of the department of corrections in the community is subject to a petition for involuntary treatment under this chapter, the petitioner shall notify the department of corrections and the department of corrections shall provide documentation of its risk assessment or other concerns to the petitioner and the court if the department of corrections classified the offender as a high risk or high needs offender.
(5) Nothing in this section creates a duty on any treatment provider or designated crisis responder to provide offender supervision.
(6) No jail or state correctional facility may be considered a less restrictive alternative to an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.



71.05.160
Petition for initial detention. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

Any facility receiving a person pursuant to RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 shall require the designated mental health professional to prepare a petition for initial detention stating the circumstances under which the person's condition was made known and stating that there is evidence, as a result of his or her personal observation or investigation, that the actions of the person for which application is made constitute a likelihood of serious harm, or that he or she is gravely disabled, and stating the specific facts known to him or her as a result of his or her personal observation or investigation, upon which he or she bases the belief that such person should be detained for the purposes and under the authority of this chapter.
If a person is involuntarily placed in an evaluation and treatment facility pursuant to RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153, on the next judicial day following the initial detention, the designated mental health professional shall file with the court and serve the designated attorney of the detained person the petition or supplemental petition for initial detention, proof of service of notice, and a copy of a notice of emergency detention.
NOTES:
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.160
Petition for initial detention. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

Any facility receiving a person pursuant to RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 shall require the designated crisis responder to prepare a petition for initial detention stating the circumstances under which the person's condition was made known and stating that there is evidence, as a result of his or her personal observation or investigation, that the actions of the person for which application is made constitute a likelihood of serious harm, or that he or she is gravely disabled, and stating the specific facts known to him or her as a result of his or her personal observation or investigation, upon which he or she bases the belief that such person should be detained for the purposes and under the authority of this chapter.
If a person is involuntarily placed in an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program pursuant to RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153, on the next judicial day following the initial detention, the designated crisis responder shall file with the court and serve the designated attorney of the detained person the petition or supplemental petition for initial detention, proof of service of notice, and a copy of a notice of emergency detention.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.170
Acceptance of petition—Notice—Duty of state hospital. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

Whenever the *county designated mental health professional petitions for detention of a person whose actions constitute a likelihood of serious harm, or who is gravely disabled, the facility providing seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment must immediately accept on a provisional basis the petition and the person. The facility shall then evaluate the person's condition and admit, detain, transfer, or discharge such person in accordance with RCW 71.05.210. The facility shall notify in writing the court and the *county designated mental health professional of the date and time of the initial detention of each person involuntarily detained in order that a probable cause hearing shall be held no later than seventy-two hours after detention.
The duty of a state hospital to accept persons for evaluation and treatment under this section shall be limited by chapter 71.24 RCW.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: The term "county designated mental health professional" as defined in RCW 71.05.020 was changed to "designated mental health professional" by 2005 c 504 § 104.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.170
Acceptance of petition—Notice—Duty of state hospital. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

Whenever the designated crisis responder petitions for detention of a person whose actions constitute a likelihood of serious harm, or who is gravely disabled, the facility providing seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment must immediately accept on a provisional basis the petition and the person. The facility shall then evaluate the person's condition and admit, detain, transfer, or discharge such person in accordance with RCW 71.05.210. The facility shall notify in writing the court and the designated crisis responder of the date and time of the initial detention of each person involuntarily detained in order that a probable cause hearing shall be held no later than seventy-two hours after detention.
The duty of a state hospital to accept persons for evaluation and treatment under this section shall be limited by chapter 71.24 RCW.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.180
Detention period for evaluation and treatment. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

If the evaluation and treatment facility admits the person, it may detain him or her for evaluation and treatment for a period not to exceed seventy-two hours from the time of acceptance as set forth in RCW 71.05.170. The computation of such seventy-two hour period shall exclude Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.

71.05.180
Detention period for evaluation and treatment. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

If the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program admits the person, it may detain him or her for evaluation and treatment for a period not to exceed seventy-two hours from the time of acceptance as set forth in RCW 71.05.170. The computation of such seventy-two hour period shall exclude Saturdays, Sundays and holidays.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.190
Persons not admitted—Transportation—Detention of arrested person pending return to custody. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

If the person is not approved for admission by a facility providing seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment, and the individual has not been arrested, the facility shall furnish transportation, if not otherwise available, for the person to his or her place of residence or other appropriate place. If the individual has been arrested, the evaluation and treatment facility shall detain the individual for not more than eight hours at the request of the peace officer. The facility shall make reasonable attempts to contact the requesting peace officer during this time to inform the peace officer that the person is not approved for admission in order to enable a peace officer to return to the facility and take the individual back into custody.
NOTES:
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.

71.05.190
Persons not admitted—Transportation—Detention of arrested person pending return to custody. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

If the person is not approved for admission by a facility providing seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment, and the individual has not been arrested, the facility shall furnish transportation, if not otherwise available, for the person to his or her place of residence or other appropriate place. If the individual has been arrested, the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program shall detain the individual for not more than eight hours at the request of the peace officer. The facility shall make reasonable attempts to contact the requesting peace officer during this time to inform the peace officer that the person is not approved for admission in order to enable a peace officer to return to the facility and take the individual back into custody.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.



71.05.195
Not guilty by reason of insanity—Detention of persons who have fled from state of origin—Probable cause hearing. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) A civil commitment may be initiated under the procedures described in RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 for a person who has been found not guilty by reason of insanity in a state other than Washington and who has fled from detention, commitment, or conditional release in that state, on the basis of a request by the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity for the person to be detained and transferred back to the custody or care of the requesting state. A finding of likelihood of serious harm or grave disability is not required for a commitment under this section. The detention may occur at either an evaluation and treatment facility or a state hospital. The petition for seventy-two hour detention filed by the designated mental health professional must be accompanied by the following documents:
(a) A copy of an order for detention, commitment, or conditional release of the person in a state other than Washington on the basis of a judgment of not guilty by reason of insanity;
(b) A warrant issued by a magistrate in the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity indicating that the person has fled from detention, commitment, or conditional release in that state and authorizing the detention of the person within the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity;
(c) A statement from the executive authority of the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity requesting that the person be returned to the requesting state and agreeing to facilitate the transfer of the person to the requesting state.
(2) The person shall be entitled to a probable cause hearing within the time limits applicable to other detentions under this chapter and shall be afforded the rights described in this chapter including the right to counsel. At the probable cause hearing, the court shall determine the identity of the person and whether the other requirements of this section are met. If the court so finds, the court may order continued detention in a treatment facility for up to thirty days for the purpose of the transfer of the person to the custody or care of the requesting state. The court may order a less restrictive alternative to detention only under conditions which ensure the person's safe transfer to the custody or care of the requesting state within thirty days without undue risk to the safety of the person or others.
(3) For the purposes of this section, "not guilty by reason of insanity" shall be construed to include any provision of law which is generally equivalent to a finding of criminal insanity within the state of Washington; and "state" shall be construed to mean any state, district, or territory of the United States.

71.05.195
Not guilty by reason of insanity—Detention of persons who have fled from state of origin—Probable cause hearing. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) A civil commitment may be initiated under the procedures described in RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 for a person who has been found not guilty by reason of insanity in a state other than Washington and who has fled from detention, commitment, or conditional release in that state, on the basis of a request by the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity for the person to be detained and transferred back to the custody or care of the requesting state. A finding of likelihood of serious harm or grave disability is not required for a commitment under this section. The detention may occur at either an evaluation and treatment facility or a state hospital. The petition for seventy-two hour detention filed by the designated crisis responder must be accompanied by the following documents:
(a) A copy of an order for detention, commitment, or conditional release of the person in a state other than Washington on the basis of a judgment of not guilty by reason of insanity;
(b) A warrant issued by a magistrate in the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity indicating that the person has fled from detention, commitment, or conditional release in that state and authorizing the detention of the person within the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity;
(c) A statement from the executive authority of the state in which the person was found not guilty by reason of insanity requesting that the person be returned to the requesting state and agreeing to facilitate the transfer of the person to the requesting state.
(2) The person shall be entitled to a probable cause hearing within the time limits applicable to other detentions under this chapter and shall be afforded the rights described in this chapter including the right to counsel. At the probable cause hearing, the court shall determine the identity of the person and whether the other requirements of this section are met. If the court so finds, the court may order continued detention in a treatment facility for up to thirty days for the purpose of the transfer of the person to the custody or care of the requesting state. The court may order a less restrictive alternative to detention only under conditions which ensure the person's safe transfer to the custody or care of the requesting state within thirty days without undue risk to the safety of the person or others.
(3) For the purposes of this section, "not guilty by reason of insanity" shall be construed to include any provision of law which is generally equivalent to a finding of criminal insanity within the state of Washington; and "state" shall be construed to mean any state, district, or territory of the United States.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.201
Decision not to detain—Petition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservator—Court review. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) If a designated mental health professional decides not to detain a person for evaluation and treatment under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or forty-eight hours have elapsed since a designated mental health professional received a request for investigation and the designated mental health professional has not taken action to have the person detained, an immediate family member or guardian or conservator of the person may petition the superior court for the person's initial detention.
(2)(a) The petition must be filed in the county in which the designated mental health professional investigation occurred or was requested to occur and must be submitted on forms developed by the administrative office of the courts for this purpose. The petition must be accompanied by a sworn declaration from the petitioner, and other witnesses if desired, describing why the person should be detained for evaluation and treatment. The description of why the person should be detained may contain, but is not limited to, the information identified in RCW 71.05.212.
(b) The petition must contain:
(i) A description of the relationship between the petitioner and the person; and
(ii) The date on which an investigation was requested from the designated mental health professional.
(3) The court shall, within one judicial day, review the petition to determine whether the petition raises sufficient evidence to support the allegation. If the court so finds, it shall provide a copy of the petition to the designated mental health professional agency with an order for the agency to provide the court, within one judicial day, with a written sworn statement describing the basis for the decision not to seek initial detention and a copy of all information material to the designated mental health professional's current decision.
(4) Following the filing of the petition and before the court reaches a decision, any person, including a mental health professional, may submit a sworn declaration to the court in support of or in opposition to initial detention.
(5) The court shall dismiss the petition at any time if it finds that a designated mental health professional has filed a petition for the person's initial detention under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or that the person has voluntarily accepted appropriate treatment.
(6) The court must issue a final ruling on the petition within five judicial days after it is filed. After reviewing all of the information provided to the court, the court may enter an order for initial detention if the court finds that: (a) There is probable cause to support a petition for detention; and (b) the person has refused or failed to accept appropriate evaluation and treatment voluntarily. The court shall transmit its final decision to the petitioner.
(7) If the court enters an order for initial detention, it shall provide the order to the designated mental health professional agency, which shall execute the order without delay. An order for initial detention under this section expires one hundred eighty days from issuance.
(8) Except as otherwise expressly stated in this chapter, all procedures must be followed as if the order had been entered under RCW 71.05.150. RCW 71.05.160 does not apply if detention was initiated under the process set forth in this section.
(9) For purposes of this section, "immediate family member" means a spouse, domestic partner, child, stepchild, parent, stepparent, grandparent, or sibling.
NOTES:
Short title2015 c 258: "This act may be known and cited as Joel's Law." [ 2015 c 258 § 1.]

71.05.201
Decision not to detain—Petition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservator—Court review. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) If a designated crisis responder decides not to detain a person for evaluation and treatment under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or forty-eight hours have elapsed since a designated crisis responder received a request for investigation and the designated crisis responder has not taken action to have the person detained, an immediate family member or guardian or conservator of the person may petition the superior court for the person's initial detention.
(2)(a) The petition must be filed in the county in which the *designated mental health professional investigation occurred or was requested to occur and must be submitted on forms developed by the administrative office of the courts for this purpose. The petition must be accompanied by a sworn declaration from the petitioner, and other witnesses if desired, describing why the person should be detained for evaluation and treatment. The description of why the person should be detained may contain, but is not limited to, the information identified in RCW 71.05.212.
(b) The petition must contain:
(i) A description of the relationship between the petitioner and the person; and
(ii) The date on which an investigation was requested from the designated crisis responder.
(3) The court shall, within one judicial day, review the petition to determine whether the petition raises sufficient evidence to support the allegation. If the court so finds, it shall provide a copy of the petition to the designated crisis responder agency with an order for the agency to provide the court, within one judicial day, with a written sworn statement describing the basis for the decision not to seek initial detention and a copy of all information material to the designated crisis responder's current decision.
(4) Following the filing of the petition and before the court reaches a decision, any person, including a mental health professional, may submit a sworn declaration to the court in support of or in opposition to initial detention.
(5) The court shall dismiss the petition at any time if it finds that a designated crisis responder has filed a petition for the person's initial detention under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or that the person has voluntarily accepted appropriate treatment.
(6) The court must issue a final ruling on the petition within five judicial days after it is filed. After reviewing all of the information provided to the court, the court may enter an order for initial detention if the court finds that: (a) There is probable cause to support a petition for detention; and (b) the person has refused or failed to accept appropriate evaluation and treatment voluntarily. The court shall transmit its final decision to the petitioner.
(7) If the court enters an order for initial detention, it shall provide the order to the designated crisis responder agency, which shall execute the order without delay. An order for initial detention under this section expires one hundred eighty days from issuance.
(8) Except as otherwise expressly stated in this chapter, all procedures must be followed as if the order had been entered under RCW 71.05.150. RCW 71.05.160 does not apply if detention was initiated under the process set forth in this section.
(9) For purposes of this section, "immediate family member" means a spouse, domestic partner, child, stepchild, parent, stepparent, grandparent, or sibling.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: *(1) The term "designated mental health professional" as defined in RCW 71.05.020 was changed to "designated crisis responder" by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 204, effective April 1, 2018.
(2) This section was amended by 2016 c 107 § 1 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 222, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Short title2015 c 258: "This act may be known and cited as Joel's Law." [ 2015 c 258 § 1.]



71.05.203
Notice—Petition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservator. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) The department and each regional support network or agency employing designated mental health professionals shall publish information in an easily accessible format describing the process for an immediate family member, guardian, or conservator to petition for court review of a detention decision under RCW 71.05.201.
(2) A designated mental health professional or designated mental health professional agency that receives a request for investigation for possible detention under this chapter must inquire whether the request comes from an immediate family member, guardian, or conservator who would be eligible to petition under RCW 71.05.201. If the designated mental health professional decides not to detain the person for evaluation and treatment under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or forty-eight hours have elapsed since the request for investigation was received and the designated mental health professional has not taken action to have the person detained, the designated mental health professional or designated mental health professional agency must inform the immediate family member, guardian, or conservator who made the request for investigation about the process to petition for court review under RCW 71.05.201.
NOTES:
Short title2015 c 258: See note following RCW 71.05.201.

71.05.203
Notice—Petition for detention by family member, guardian, or conservator. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) The department and each behavioral health organization or agency employing designated crisis responders shall publish information in an easily accessible format describing the process for an immediate family member, guardian, or conservator to petition for court review of a detention decision under RCW 71.05.201.
(2) A designated crisis responder or designated crisis responder agency that receives a request for investigation for possible detention under this chapter must inquire whether the request comes from an immediate family member, guardian, or conservator who would be eligible to petition under RCW 71.05.201. If the designated crisis responder decides not to detain the person for evaluation and treatment under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153 or forty-eight hours have elapsed since the request for investigation was received and the designated crisis responder has not taken action to have the person detained, the designated crisis responder or designated crisis responder agency must inform the immediate family member, guardian, or conservator who made the request for investigation about the process to petition for court review under RCW 71.05.201.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Short title2015 c 258: See note following RCW 71.05.201.



71.05.210
Evaluation—Treatment and care—Release or other disposition. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Each person involuntarily detained and accepted or admitted at an evaluation and treatment facility:
(a) Shall, within twenty-four hours of his or her admission or acceptance at the facility, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, be examined and evaluated by:
(i) One physician and a mental health professional;
(ii) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(iii) One advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional; and
(b) Shall receive such treatment and care as his or her condition requires including treatment on an outpatient basis for the period that he or she is detained, except that, beginning twenty-four hours prior to a trial or hearing pursuant to RCW 71.05.215, 71.05.240, 71.05.310, 71.05.320, 71.05.590, or 71.05.217, the individual may refuse psychiatric medications, but may not refuse: (i) Any other medication previously prescribed by a person licensed under Title 18 RCW; or (ii) emergency lifesaving treatment, and the individual shall be informed at an appropriate time of his or her right of such refusal. The person shall be detained up to seventy-two hours, if, in the opinion of the professional person in charge of the facility, or his or her professional designee, the person presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled. A person who has been detained for seventy-two hours shall no later than the end of such period be released, unless referred for further care on a voluntary basis, or detained pursuant to court order for further treatment as provided in this chapter.
(2) If, after examination and evaluation, the mental health professional and licensed physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner determine that the initial needs of the person would be better served by placement in a chemical dependency treatment facility, then the person shall be referred to an approved treatment program defined under *RCW 70.96A.020.
(3) An evaluation and treatment center admitting or accepting any person pursuant to this chapter whose physical condition reveals the need for hospitalization shall assure that such person is transferred to an appropriate hospital for evaluation or admission for treatment. Notice of such fact shall be given to the court, the designated attorney, and the designated mental health professional and the court shall order such continuance in proceedings under this chapter as may be necessary, but in no event may this continuance be more than fourteen days.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 70.96A.020 was amended by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 101, changing the term "approved treatment program" to "approved substance use disorder treatment program."
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
SeverabilityHeadings and captions not lawEffective date1994 sp.s. c 9: See RCW 18.79.900 through 18.79.902.
FindingsConstructionConflict with federal requirements1991 c 364: See notes following RCW 70.96A.020.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.

71.05.210
Evaluation—Treatment and care—Release or other disposition. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1) Each person involuntarily detained and accepted or admitted at an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program:
(a) Shall, within twenty-four hours of his or her admission or acceptance at the facility, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, be examined and evaluated by:
(i) One physician and a mental health professional;
(ii) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(iii) One advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional; and
(b) Shall receive such treatment and care as his or her condition requires including treatment on an outpatient basis for the period that he or she is detained, except that, beginning twenty-four hours prior to a trial or hearing pursuant to RCW 71.05.215, 71.05.240, 71.05.310, 71.05.320, 71.05.590, or 71.05.217, the individual may refuse psychiatric medications, but may not refuse: (i) Any other medication previously prescribed by a person licensed under Title 18 RCW; or (ii) emergency lifesaving treatment, and the individual shall be informed at an appropriate time of his or her right of such refusal. The person shall be detained up to seventy-two hours, if, in the opinion of the professional person in charge of the facility, or his or her professional designee, the person presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled. A person who has been detained for seventy-two hours shall no later than the end of such period be released, unless referred for further care on a voluntary basis, or detained pursuant to court order for further treatment as provided in this chapter.
(2) If, after examination and evaluation, the mental health professional and licensed physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner determine that the initial needs of the person, if detained to an evaluation and treatment facility, would be better served by placement in a substance use disorder treatment facility, or, if detained to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program, would be better served in an evaluation and treatment facility then the person shall be referred to the more appropriate placement; however, a person may only be referred to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program if there is an available secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program with adequate space for the person.
(3) An evaluation and treatment center, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program admitting or accepting any person pursuant to this chapter whose physical condition reveals the need for hospitalization shall assure that such person is transferred to an appropriate hospital for evaluation or admission for treatment. Notice of such fact shall be given to the court, the designated attorney, and the designated crisis responder and the court shall order such continuance in proceedings under this chapter as may be necessary, but in no event may this continuance be more than fourteen days.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 2 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 224, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
SeverabilityHeadings and captions not lawEffective date1994 sp.s. c 9: See RCW 18.79.900 through 18.79.902.
FindingsConstructionConflict with federal requirements1991 c 364: See notes following RCW 70.96A.020.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.

71.05.210
Evaluation—Treatment and care—Release or other disposition. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1) Each person involuntarily detained and accepted or admitted at an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program:
(a) Shall, within twenty-four hours of his or her admission or acceptance at the facility, not counting time periods prior to medical clearance, be examined and evaluated by:
(i) One physician and a mental health professional;
(ii) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(iii) One advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional; and
(b) Shall receive such treatment and care as his or her condition requires including treatment on an outpatient basis for the period that he or she is detained, except that, beginning twenty-four hours prior to a trial or hearing pursuant to RCW 71.05.215, 71.05.240, 71.05.310, 71.05.320, 71.05.590, or 71.05.217, the individual may refuse psychiatric medications, but may not refuse: (i) Any other medication previously prescribed by a person licensed under Title 18 RCW; or (ii) emergency lifesaving treatment, and the individual shall be informed at an appropriate time of his or her right of such refusal. The person shall be detained up to seventy-two hours, if, in the opinion of the professional person in charge of the facility, or his or her professional designee, the person presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled. A person who has been detained for seventy-two hours shall no later than the end of such period be released, unless referred for further care on a voluntary basis, or detained pursuant to court order for further treatment as provided in this chapter.
(2) If, after examination and evaluation, the mental health professional and licensed physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner determine that the initial needs of the person, if detained to an evaluation and treatment facility, would be better served by placement in a substance use disorder treatment facility, or, if detained to a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program, would be better served in an evaluation and treatment facility then the person shall be referred to the more appropriate placement.
(3) An evaluation and treatment center, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program admitting or accepting any person pursuant to this chapter whose physical condition reveals the need for hospitalization shall assure that such person is transferred to an appropriate hospital for evaluation or admission for treatment. Notice of such fact shall be given to the court, the designated attorney, and the designated crisis responder and the court shall order such continuance in proceedings under this chapter as may be necessary, but in no event may this continuance be more than fourteen days.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
SeverabilityHeadings and captions not lawEffective date1994 sp.s. c 9: See RCW 18.79.900 through 18.79.902.
FindingsConstructionConflict with federal requirements1991 c 364: See notes following RCW 70.96A.020.
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.



71.05.212
Evaluation—Consideration of information and records. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Whenever a designated mental health professional or professional person is conducting an evaluation under this chapter, consideration shall include all reasonably available information from credible witnesses and records regarding:
(a) Prior recommendations for evaluation of the need for civil commitments when the recommendation is made pursuant to an evaluation conducted under chapter 10.77 RCW;
(b) Historical behavior, including history of one or more violent acts;
(c) Prior determinations of incompetency or insanity under chapter 10.77 RCW; and
(d) Prior commitments under this chapter.
(2) Credible witnesses may include family members, landlords, neighbors, or others with significant contact and history of involvement with the person. If the designated mental health professional relies upon information from a credible witness in reaching his or her decision to detain the individual, then he or she must provide contact information for any such witness to the prosecutor. The designated mental health professional or prosecutor shall provide notice of the date, time, and location of the probable cause hearing to such a witness.
(3) Symptoms and behavior of the respondent which standing alone would not justify civil commitment may support a finding of grave disability or likelihood of serious harm, or a finding that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, when:
(a) Such symptoms or behavior are closely associated with symptoms or behavior which preceded and led to a past incident of involuntary hospitalization, severe deterioration, or one or more violent acts;
(b) These symptoms or behavior represent a marked and concerning change in the baseline behavior of the respondent; and
(c) Without treatment, the continued deterioration of the respondent is probable.
(4) When conducting an evaluation for offenders identified under RCW 72.09.370, the designated mental health professional or professional person shall consider an offender's history of judicially required or administratively ordered antipsychotic medication while in confinement.
[ 2015 c 250 § 5; 2010 c 280 § 2; (2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 2 expired July 1, 2014); 1999 c 214 § 5; 1998 c 297 § 19.]
NOTES:
Effective date2013 c 335; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6; 2010 c 280 §§ 2 and 3: "Sections 2 and 3 of this act take effect July 1, 2014." [ 2013 c 335 § 1; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 1; 2010 c 280 § 5.]
Expiration date2013 c 335; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 2: "Section 2 of this act expires July 1, 2014." [ 2013 c 335 § 2; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 3.]
Effective date2011 2nd sp.s. c 6: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [December 20, 2011], except for section 2 of this act which takes effect January 1, 2012." [ 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 4.]
IntentEffective date1999 c 214: See notes following RCW 72.09.370.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.212
Evaluation—Consideration of information and records. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Whenever a designated crisis responder or professional person is conducting an evaluation under this chapter, consideration shall include all reasonably available information from credible witnesses and records regarding:
(a) Prior recommendations for evaluation of the need for civil commitments when the recommendation is made pursuant to an evaluation conducted under chapter 10.77 RCW;
(b) Historical behavior, including history of one or more violent acts;
(c) Prior determinations of incompetency or insanity under chapter 10.77 RCW; and
(d) Prior commitments under this chapter.
(2) Credible witnesses may include family members, landlords, neighbors, or others with significant contact and history of involvement with the person. If the designated crisis responder relies upon information from a credible witness in reaching his or her decision to detain the individual, then he or she must provide contact information for any such witness to the prosecutor. The designated crisis responder or prosecutor shall provide notice of the date, time, and location of the probable cause hearing to such a witness.
(3) Symptoms and behavior of the respondent which standing alone would not justify civil commitment may support a finding of grave disability or likelihood of serious harm, or a finding that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, when:
(a) Such symptoms or behavior are closely associated with symptoms or behavior which preceded and led to a past incident of involuntary hospitalization, severe deterioration, or one or more violent acts;
(b) These symptoms or behavior represent a marked and concerning change in the baseline behavior of the respondent; and
(c) Without treatment, the continued deterioration of the respondent is probable.
(4) When conducting an evaluation for offenders identified under RCW 72.09.370, the designated crisis responder or professional person shall consider an offender's history of judicially required or administratively ordered antipsychotic medication while in confinement.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2013 c 335; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6; 2010 c 280 §§ 2 and 3: "Sections 2 and 3 of this act take effect July 1, 2014." [ 2013 c 335 § 1; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 1; 2010 c 280 § 5.]
Expiration date2013 c 335; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 2: "Section 2 of this act expires July 1, 2014." [ 2013 c 335 § 2; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 3.]
Effective date2011 2nd sp.s. c 6: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect immediately [December 20, 2011], except for section 2 of this act which takes effect January 1, 2012." [ 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6 § 4.]
IntentEffective date1999 c 214: See notes following RCW 72.09.370.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.214
Protocols—Development—Submission to governor and legislature. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

The department shall develop statewide protocols to be utilized by professional persons and *county designated mental health professionals in administration of this chapter and chapter 10.77 RCW. The protocols shall be updated at least every three years. The protocols shall provide uniform development and application of criteria in evaluation and commitment recommendations, of persons who have, or are alleged to have, mental disorders and are subject to this chapter.
The initial protocols shall be developed not later than September 1, 1999. The department shall develop and update the protocols in consultation with representatives of *county designated mental health professionals, local government, law enforcement, county and city prosecutors, public defenders, and groups concerned with mental illness. The protocols shall be submitted to the governor and legislature upon adoption by the department.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: The term "county designated mental health professional" as defined in RCW 71.05.020 was changed to "designated mental health professional" by 2005 c 504 § 104.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.214
Protocols—Development—Submission to governor and legislature. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

The department shall develop statewide protocols to be utilized by professional persons and designated crisis responders in administration of this chapter and chapter 10.77 RCW. The protocols shall be updated at least every three years. The protocols shall provide uniform development and application of criteria in evaluation and commitment recommendations, of persons who have, or are alleged to have, mental disorders or substance use disorders and are subject to this chapter.
The initial protocols shall be developed not later than September 1, 1999. The department shall develop and update the protocols in consultation with representatives of designated crisis responders, local government, law enforcement, county and city prosecutors, public defenders, and groups concerned with mental illness and substance use disorders. The protocols shall be submitted to the governor and legislature upon adoption by the department.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.215
Right to refuse antipsychotic medicine—Rules. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) A person found to be gravely disabled or presents a likelihood of serious harm as a result of a mental disorder has a right to refuse antipsychotic medication unless it is determined that the failure to medicate may result in a likelihood of serious harm or substantial deterioration or substantially prolong the length of involuntary commitment and there is no less intrusive course of treatment than medication in the best interest of that person.
(2) The department shall adopt rules to carry out the purposes of this chapter. These rules shall include:
(a) An attempt to obtain the informed consent of the person prior to administration of antipsychotic medication.
(b) For short-term treatment up to thirty days, the right to refuse antipsychotic medications unless there is an additional concurring medical opinion approving medication by a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority.
(c) For continued treatment beyond thirty days through the hearing on any petition filed under RCW 71.05.217, the right to periodic review of the decision to medicate by the medical director or designee.
(d) Administration of antipsychotic medication in an emergency and review of this decision within twenty-four hours. An emergency exists if the person presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, and medically acceptable alternatives to administration of antipsychotic medications are not available or are unlikely to be successful; and in the opinion of the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, the person's condition constitutes an emergency requiring the treatment be instituted prior to obtaining a second medical opinion.
(e) Documentation in the medical record of the attempt by the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner to obtain informed consent and the reasons why antipsychotic medication is being administered over the person's objection or lack of consent.
NOTES:
Severability1991 c 105: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1991 c 105 § 6.]

71.05.215
Right to refuse antipsychotic medicine—Rules. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) A person found to be gravely disabled or presents a likelihood of serious harm as a result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder has a right to refuse antipsychotic medication unless it is determined that the failure to medicate may result in a likelihood of serious harm or substantial deterioration or substantially prolong the length of involuntary commitment and there is no less intrusive course of treatment than medication in the best interest of that person.
(2) The department shall adopt rules to carry out the purposes of this chapter. These rules shall include:
(a) An attempt to obtain the informed consent of the person prior to administration of antipsychotic medication.
(b) For short-term treatment up to thirty days, the right to refuse antipsychotic medications unless there is an additional concurring medical opinion approving medication by a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician or physician assistant in consultation with a mental health professional with prescriptive authority.
(c) For continued treatment beyond thirty days through the hearing on any petition filed under RCW 71.05.217, the right to periodic review of the decision to medicate by the medical director or designee.
(d) Administration of antipsychotic medication in an emergency and review of this decision within twenty-four hours. An emergency exists if the person presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm, and medically acceptable alternatives to administration of antipsychotic medications are not available or are unlikely to be successful; and in the opinion of the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, the person's condition constitutes an emergency requiring the treatment be instituted prior to obtaining a second medical opinion.
(e) Documentation in the medical record of the attempt by the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner to obtain informed consent and the reasons why antipsychotic medication is being administered over the person's objection or lack of consent.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 3 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 228, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Severability1991 c 105: "If any provision of this act or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, the remainder of the act or the application of the provision to other persons or circumstances is not affected." [ 1991 c 105 § 6.]



71.05.217
Rights—Posting of list.

Insofar as danger to the individual or others is not created, each person involuntarily detained, treated in a less restrictive alternative course of treatment, or committed for treatment and evaluation pursuant to this chapter shall have, in addition to other rights not specifically withheld by law, the following rights, a list of which shall be prominently posted in all facilities, institutions, and hospitals providing such services:
(1) To wear his or her own clothes and to keep and use his or her own personal possessions, except when deprivation of same is essential to protect the safety of the resident or other persons;
(2) To keep and be allowed to spend a reasonable sum of his or her own money for canteen expenses and small purchases;
(3) To have access to individual storage space for his or her private use;
(4) To have visitors at reasonable times;
(5) To have reasonable access to a telephone, both to make and receive confidential calls;
(6) To have ready access to letter writing materials, including stamps, and to send and receive uncensored correspondence through the mails;
(7) Not to consent to the administration of antipsychotic medications beyond the hearing conducted pursuant to RCW 71.05.320(4) or the performance of electroconvulsant therapy or surgery, except emergency lifesaving surgery, unless ordered by a court of competent jurisdiction pursuant to the following standards and procedures:
(a) The administration of antipsychotic medication or electroconvulsant therapy shall not be ordered unless the petitioning party proves by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence that there exists a compelling state interest that justifies overriding the patient's lack of consent to the administration of antipsychotic medications or electroconvulsant therapy, that the proposed treatment is necessary and effective, and that medically acceptable alternative forms of treatment are not available, have not been successful, or are not likely to be effective.
(b) The court shall make specific findings of fact concerning: (i) The existence of one or more compelling state interests; (ii) the necessity and effectiveness of the treatment; and (iii) the person's desires regarding the proposed treatment. If the patient is unable to make a rational and informed decision about consenting to or refusing the proposed treatment, the court shall make a substituted judgment for the patient as if he or she were competent to make such a determination.
(c) The person shall be present at any hearing on a request to administer antipsychotic medication or electroconvulsant therapy filed pursuant to this subsection. The person has the right: (i) To be represented by an attorney; (ii) to present evidence; (iii) to cross-examine witnesses; (iv) to have the rules of evidence enforced; (v) to remain silent; (vi) to view and copy all petitions and reports in the court file; and (vii) to be given reasonable notice and an opportunity to prepare for the hearing. The court may appoint a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychologist within their scope of practice, physician assistant, or physician to examine and testify on behalf of such person. The court shall appoint a psychiatrist, physician assistant working with a supervising psychiatrist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychologist within their scope of practice, physician assistant, or physician designated by such person or the person's counsel to testify on behalf of the person in cases where an order for electroconvulsant therapy is sought.
(d) An order for the administration of antipsychotic medications entered following a hearing conducted pursuant to this section shall be effective for the period of the current involuntary treatment order, and any interim period during which the person is awaiting trial or hearing on a new petition for involuntary treatment or involuntary medication.
(e) Any person detained pursuant to RCW 71.05.320(4), who subsequently refuses antipsychotic medication, shall be entitled to the procedures set forth in this subsection.
(f) Antipsychotic medication may be administered to a nonconsenting person detained or committed pursuant to this chapter without a court order pursuant to RCW 71.05.215(2) or under the following circumstances:
(i) A person presents an imminent likelihood of serious harm;
(ii) Medically acceptable alternatives to administration of antipsychotic medications are not available, have not been successful, or are not likely to be effective; and
(iii) In the opinion of the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner with responsibility for treatment of the person, or his or her designee, the person's condition constitutes an emergency requiring the treatment be instituted before a judicial hearing as authorized pursuant to this section can be held.
If antipsychotic medications are administered over a person's lack of consent pursuant to this subsection, a petition for an order authorizing the administration of antipsychotic medications shall be filed on the next judicial day. The hearing shall be held within two judicial days. If deemed necessary by the physician, physician assistant, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner with responsibility for the treatment of the person, administration of antipsychotic medications may continue until the hearing is held;
(8) To dispose of property and sign contracts unless such person has been adjudicated an incompetent in a court proceeding directed to that particular issue;
(9) Not to have psychosurgery performed on him or her under any circumstances.
NOTES:
Severability1991 c 105: See note following RCW 71.05.215.



71.05.220
Property of committed person. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

At the time a person is involuntarily admitted to an evaluation and treatment facility, the professional person in charge or his or her designee shall take reasonable precautions to inventory and safeguard the personal property of the person detained. A copy of the inventory, signed by the staff member making it, shall be given to the person detained and shall, in addition, be open to inspection to any responsible relative, subject to limitations, if any, specifically imposed by the detained person. For purposes of this section, "responsible relative" includes the guardian, conservator, attorney, spouse, parent, adult child, or adult brother or sister of the person. The facility shall not disclose the contents of the inventory to any other person without the consent of the patient or order of the court.

71.05.220
Property of committed person. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

At the time a person is involuntarily admitted to an evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program, the professional person in charge or his or her designee shall take reasonable precautions to inventory and safeguard the personal property of the person detained. A copy of the inventory, signed by the staff member making it, shall be given to the person detained and shall, in addition, be open to inspection to any responsible relative, subject to limitations, if any, specifically imposed by the detained person. For purposes of this section, "responsible relative" includes the guardian, conservator, attorney, spouse, parent, adult child, or adult brother or sister of the person. The facility shall not disclose the contents of the inventory to any other person without the consent of the patient or order of the court.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.230
Procedures for additional treatment. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

A person detained or committed for seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment or for an outpatient evaluation for the purpose of filing a petition for a less restrictive alternative treatment order may be committed for not more than fourteen additional days of involuntary intensive treatment or ninety additional days of a less restrictive alternative to involuntary intensive treatment. A petition may only be filed if the following conditions are met:
(1) The professional staff of the agency or facility providing evaluation services has analyzed the person's condition and finds that the condition is caused by mental disorder and results in a likelihood of serious harm, results in the person being gravely disabled, or results in the person being in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and are prepared to testify those conditions are met; and
(2) The person has been advised of the need for voluntary treatment and the professional staff of the facility has evidence that he or she has not in good faith volunteered; and
(3) The agency or facility providing intensive treatment or which proposes to supervise the less restrictive alternative is certified to provide such treatment by the department; and
(4) The professional staff of the agency or facility or the designated mental health professional has filed a petition with the court for a fourteen day involuntary detention or a ninety day less restrictive alternative. The petition must be signed either by:
(a) Two physicians;
(b) One physician and a mental health professional;
(c) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(d) One psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional. The persons signing the petition must have examined the person. If involuntary detention is sought the petition shall state facts that support the finding that such person, as a result of mental disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled and that there are no less restrictive alternatives to detention in the best interest of such person or others. The petition shall state specifically that less restrictive alternative treatment was considered and specify why treatment less restrictive than detention is not appropriate. If an involuntary less restrictive alternative is sought, the petition shall state facts that support the finding that such person, as a result of mental disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, is gravely disabled, or is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services; and
(5) A copy of the petition has been served on the detained or committed person, his or her attorney and his or her guardian or conservator, if any, prior to the probable cause hearing; and
(6) The court at the time the petition was filed and before the probable cause hearing has appointed counsel to represent such person if no other counsel has appeared; and
(7) The petition reflects that the person was informed of the loss of firearm rights if involuntarily committed; and
(8) At the conclusion of the initial commitment period, the professional staff of the agency or facility or the designated mental health professional may petition for an additional period of either ninety days of less restrictive alternative treatment or ninety days of involuntary intensive treatment as provided in RCW 71.05.290; and
(9) If the hospital or facility designated to provide less restrictive alternative treatment is other than the facility providing involuntary treatment, the outpatient facility so designated to provide less restrictive alternative treatment has agreed to assume such responsibility.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 1 and by 2016 c 155 § 5, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
IntentEffective date2011 c 343: See notes following RCW 71.05.730.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.230
Procedures for additional treatment. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

A person detained or committed for seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment or for an outpatient evaluation for the purpose of filing a petition for a less restrictive alternative treatment order may be committed for not more than fourteen additional days of involuntary intensive treatment or ninety additional days of a less restrictive alternative to involuntary intensive treatment. A petition may only be filed if the following conditions are met:
(1) The professional staff of the agency or facility providing evaluation services has analyzed the person's condition and finds that the condition is caused by mental disorder or substance use disorder and results in a likelihood of serious harm, results in the person being gravely disabled, or results in the person being in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and are prepared to testify those conditions are met; and
(2) The person has been advised of the need for voluntary treatment and the professional staff of the facility has evidence that he or she has not in good faith volunteered; and
(3) The agency or facility providing intensive treatment or which proposes to supervise the less restrictive alternative is certified to provide such treatment by the department; and
(4) The professional staff of the agency or facility or the designated crisis responder has filed a petition with the court for a fourteen day involuntary detention or a ninety day less restrictive alternative. The petition must be signed either by:
(a) Two physicians;
(b) One physician and a mental health professional;
(c) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(d) One psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional. The persons signing the petition must have examined the person. If involuntary detention is sought the petition shall state facts that support the finding that such person, as a result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled and that there are no less restrictive alternatives to detention in the best interest of such person or others. The petition shall state specifically that less restrictive alternative treatment was considered and specify why treatment less restrictive than detention is not appropriate. If an involuntary less restrictive alternative is sought, the petition shall state facts that support the finding that such person, as a result of a mental disorder or as a result of a substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, is gravely disabled, or is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services; and
(5) A copy of the petition has been served on the detained or committed person, his or her attorney and his or her guardian or conservator, if any, prior to the probable cause hearing; and
(6) The court at the time the petition was filed and before the probable cause hearing has appointed counsel to represent such person if no other counsel has appeared; and
(7) The petition reflects that the person was informed of the loss of firearm rights if involuntarily committed for mental health treatment; and
(8) At the conclusion of the initial commitment period, the professional staff of the agency or facility or the designated crisis responder may petition for an additional period of either ninety days of less restrictive alternative treatment or ninety days of involuntary intensive treatment as provided in RCW 71.05.290; and
(9) If the hospital or facility designated to provide less restrictive alternative treatment is other than the facility providing involuntary treatment, the outpatient facility so designated to provide less restrictive alternative treatment has agreed to assume such responsibility.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 1, 2016 c 155 § 5, and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 230, each without reference to the other. All amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
IntentEffective date2011 c 343: See notes following RCW 71.05.730.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.232
Discharge reviews—Consultations, notifications required.

(1) When a state hospital admits a person for evaluation or treatment under this chapter who has a history of one or more violent acts and:
(a) Has been transferred from a correctional facility; or
(b) Is or has been under the authority of the department of corrections or the indeterminate sentence review board,
the state hospital shall consult with the appropriate corrections and chemical dependency personnel and the appropriate forensic staff at the state hospital to conduct a discharge review to determine whether the person presents a likelihood of serious harm and whether the person is appropriate for release to a less restrictive alternative.
(2) When a state hospital returns a person who was reviewed under subsection (1) of this section to a correctional facility, the hospital shall notify the correctional facility that the person was subject to a discharge review pursuant to this section.
NOTES:
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.



71.05.235
Examination, evaluation of criminal defendant—Hearing. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) If an individual is referred to a designated mental health professional under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(i), the designated mental health professional shall examine the individual within forty-eight hours. If the designated mental health professional determines it is not appropriate to detain the individual or petition for a ninety-day less restrictive alternative under RCW 71.05.230(4), that decision shall be immediately presented to the superior court for hearing. The court shall hold a hearing to consider the decision of the designated mental health professional not later than the next judicial day. At the hearing the superior court shall review the determination of the designated mental health professional and determine whether an order should be entered requiring the person to be evaluated at an evaluation and treatment facility. No person referred to an evaluation and treatment facility may be held at the facility longer than seventy-two hours.
(2) If an individual is placed in an evaluation and treatment facility under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(ii), a professional person shall evaluate the individual for purposes of determining whether to file a ninety-day inpatient or outpatient petition under chapter 71.05 RCW. Before expiration of the seventy-two hour evaluation period authorized under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(ii), the professional person shall file a petition or, if the recommendation of the professional person is to release the individual, present his or her recommendation to the superior court of the county in which the criminal charge was dismissed. The superior court shall review the recommendation not later than forty-eight hours, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, after the recommendation is presented. If the court rejects the recommendation to unconditionally release the individual, the court may order the individual detained at a designated evaluation and treatment facility for not more than a seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment period and direct the individual to appear at a surety hearing before that court within seventy-two hours, or the court may release the individual but direct the individual to appear at a surety hearing set before that court within eleven days, at which time the prosecutor may file a petition under this chapter for ninety-day inpatient or outpatient treatment. If a petition is filed by the prosecutor, the court may order that the person named in the petition be detained at the evaluation and treatment facility that performed the evaluation under this subsection or order the respondent to be in outpatient treatment. If a petition is filed but the individual fails to appear in court for the surety hearing, the court shall order that a mental health professional or peace officer shall take such person or cause such person to be taken into custody and placed in an evaluation and treatment facility to be brought before the court the next judicial day after detention. Upon the individual's first appearance in court after a petition has been filed, proceedings under RCW 71.05.310 and 71.05.320 shall commence. For an individual subject to this subsection, the prosecutor or professional person may directly file a petition for ninety-day inpatient or outpatient treatment and no petition for initial detention or fourteen-day detention is required before such a petition may be filed.
The court shall conduct the hearing on the petition filed under this subsection within five judicial days of the date the petition is filed. The court may continue the hearing upon the written request of the person named in the petition or the person's attorney, for good cause shown, which continuance shall not exceed five additional judicial days. If the person named in the petition requests a jury trial, the trial shall commence within ten judicial days of the date of the filing of the petition. The burden of proof shall be by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence and shall be upon the petitioner. The person shall be present at such proceeding, which shall in all respects accord with the constitutional guarantees of due process of law and the rules of evidence pursuant to RCW 71.05.360 (8) and (9).
During the proceeding the person named in the petition shall continue to be detained and treated until released by order of the court. If no order has been made within thirty days after the filing of the petition, not including any extensions of time requested by the detained person or his or her attorney, the detained person shall be released.
(3) If a designated mental health professional or the professional person and prosecuting attorney for the county in which the criminal charge was dismissed or attorney general, as appropriate, stipulate that the individual does not present a likelihood of serious harm or is not gravely disabled, the hearing under this section is not required and the individual, if in custody, shall be released.
(4) The individual shall have the rights specified in RCW 71.05.360 (8) and (9).
NOTES:
Finding2015 1st sp.s. c 7: See note following RCW 10.77.075.
Effective dates2015 1st sp.s. c 7: See note following RCW 10.77.073.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Severability2000 c 74: See note following RCW 10.77.060.
Effective date1999 c 11: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect March 1, 1999, or upon approval by the governor, whichever occurs later [April 15, 1999]." [ 1999 c 11 § 2.]
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.235
Examination, evaluation of criminal defendant—Hearing. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) If an individual is referred to a designated crisis responder under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(i), the designated crisis responder shall examine the individual within forty-eight hours. If the designated crisis responder determines it is not appropriate to detain the individual or petition for a ninety-day less restrictive alternative under RCW 71.05.230(4), that decision shall be immediately presented to the superior court for hearing. The court shall hold a hearing to consider the decision of the designated crisis responder not later than the next judicial day. At the hearing the superior court shall review the determination of the designated crisis responder and determine whether an order should be entered requiring the person to be evaluated at an evaluation and treatment facility. No person referred to an evaluation and treatment facility may be held at the facility longer than seventy-two hours.
(2) If an individual is placed in an evaluation and treatment facility under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(ii), a professional person shall evaluate the individual for purposes of determining whether to file a ninety-day inpatient or outpatient petition under this chapter. Before expiration of the seventy-two hour evaluation period authorized under RCW 10.77.088(1)(c)(ii), the professional person shall file a petition or, if the recommendation of the professional person is to release the individual, present his or her recommendation to the superior court of the county in which the criminal charge was dismissed. The superior court shall review the recommendation not later than forty-eight hours, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, after the recommendation is presented. If the court rejects the recommendation to unconditionally release the individual, the court may order the individual detained at a designated evaluation and treatment facility for not more than a seventy-two hour evaluation and treatment period and direct the individual to appear at a surety hearing before that court within seventy-two hours, or the court may release the individual but direct the individual to appear at a surety hearing set before that court within eleven days, at which time the prosecutor may file a petition under this chapter for ninety-day inpatient or outpatient treatment. If a petition is filed by the prosecutor, the court may order that the person named in the petition be detained at the evaluation and treatment facility that performed the evaluation under this subsection or order the respondent to be in outpatient treatment. If a petition is filed but the individual fails to appear in court for the surety hearing, the court shall order that a mental health professional or peace officer shall take such person or cause such person to be taken into custody and placed in an evaluation and treatment facility to be brought before the court the next judicial day after detention. Upon the individual's first appearance in court after a petition has been filed, proceedings under RCW 71.05.310 and 71.05.320 shall commence. For an individual subject to this subsection, the prosecutor or professional person may directly file a petition for ninety-day inpatient or outpatient treatment and no petition for initial detention or fourteen-day detention is required before such a petition may be filed.
The court shall conduct the hearing on the petition filed under this subsection within five judicial days of the date the petition is filed. The court may continue the hearing upon the written request of the person named in the petition or the person's attorney, for good cause shown, which continuance shall not exceed five additional judicial days. If the person named in the petition requests a jury trial, the trial shall commence within ten judicial days of the date of the filing of the petition. The burden of proof shall be by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence and shall be upon the petitioner. The person shall be present at such proceeding, which shall in all respects accord with the constitutional guarantees of due process of law and the rules of evidence pursuant to RCW 71.05.360 (8) and (9).
During the proceeding the person named in the petition shall continue to be detained and treated until released by order of the court. If no order has been made within thirty days after the filing of the petition, not including any extensions of time requested by the detained person or his or her attorney, the detained person shall be released.
(3) If a designated crisis responder or the professional person and prosecuting attorney for the county in which the criminal charge was dismissed or attorney general, as appropriate, stipulate that the individual does not present a likelihood of serious harm or is not gravely disabled, the hearing under this section is not required and the individual, if in custody, shall be released.
(4) The individual shall have the rights specified in RCW 71.05.360 (8) and (9).
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Finding2015 1st sp.s. c 7: See note following RCW 10.77.075.
Effective dates2015 1st sp.s. c 7: See note following RCW 10.77.073.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Severability2000 c 74: See note following RCW 10.77.060.
Effective date1999 c 11: "This act is necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and takes effect March 1, 1999, or upon approval by the governor, whichever occurs later [April 15, 1999]." [ 1999 c 11 § 2.]
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.237
Judicial proceedings—Court to enter findings when recommendations of professional person not followed.

In any judicial proceeding in which a professional person has made a recommendation regarding whether an individual should be committed for treatment under this chapter, and the court does not follow the recommendation, the court shall enter findings that state with particularity its reasoning, including a finding whether the state met its burden of proof in showing whether the person presents a likelihood of serious harm.
NOTES:
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.240
Petition for involuntary treatment or alternative treatment—Probable cause hearing. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) If a petition is filed for fourteen day involuntary treatment or ninety days of less restrictive alternative treatment, the court shall hold a probable cause hearing within seventy-two hours of the initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of such person as determined in RCW 71.05.180. If requested by the person or his or her attorney, the hearing may be postponed for a period not to exceed forty-eight hours. The hearing may also be continued subject to the conditions set forth in RCW 71.05.210 or subject to the petitioner's showing of good cause for a period not to exceed twenty-four hours.
(2) The court at the time of the probable cause hearing and before an order of commitment is entered shall inform the person both orally and in writing that the failure to make a good faith effort to seek voluntary treatment as provided in RCW 71.05.230 will result in the loss of his or her firearm rights if the person is subsequently detained for involuntary treatment under this section.
(3) At the conclusion of the probable cause hearing:
(a) If the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of mental disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, and, after considering less restrictive alternatives to involuntary detention and treatment, finds that no such alternatives are in the best interests of such person or others, the court shall order that such person be detained for involuntary treatment not to exceed fourteen days in a facility certified to provide treatment by the department. If the court finds that such person, as the result of a mental disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, but that treatment in a less restrictive setting than detention is in the best interest of such person or others, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment for not to exceed ninety days;
(b) If the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder, is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and that the person does not present a likelihood of serious harm or grave disability, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment not to exceed ninety days, and may not order inpatient treatment;
(c) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The court shall specifically state to such person and give such person notice in writing that if involuntary treatment beyond the fourteen day period or beyond the ninety days of less restrictive treatment is to be sought, such person will have the right to a full hearing or jury trial as required by RCW 71.05.310. The court shall also state to the person and provide written notice that the person is barred from the possession of firearms and that the prohibition remains in effect until a court restores his or her right to possess a firearm under RCW 9.41.047.
NOTES:
Severability1992 c 168: See note following RCW 9.41.070.

71.05.240
Petition for involuntary treatment or alternative treatment—Probable cause hearing. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1) If a petition is filed for fourteen day involuntary treatment or ninety days of less restrictive alternative treatment, the court shall hold a probable cause hearing within seventy-two hours of the initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of such person as determined in RCW 71.05.180. If requested by the person or his or her attorney, the hearing may be postponed for a period not to exceed forty-eight hours. The hearing may also be continued subject to the conditions set forth in RCW 71.05.210 or subject to the petitioner's showing of good cause for a period not to exceed twenty-four hours.
(2) If the petition is for mental health treatment, the court at the time of the probable cause hearing and before an order of commitment is entered shall inform the person both orally and in writing that the failure to make a good faith effort to seek voluntary treatment as provided in RCW 71.05.230 will result in the loss of his or her firearm rights if the person is subsequently detained for involuntary treatment under this section.
(3)(a) Subject to (b) of this subsection, at the conclusion of the probable cause hearing, if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, and, after considering less restrictive alternatives to involuntary detention and treatment, finds that no such alternatives are in the best interests of such person or others, the court shall order that such person be detained for involuntary treatment not to exceed fourteen days in a facility certified to provide treatment by the department.
(b) Commitment for up to fourteen days based on a substance use disorder must be to either a secure detoxification facility or an approved substance use disorder treatment program. A court may only enter a commitment order based on a substance use disorder if there is an available secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program with adequate space for the person.
(c) At the conclusion of the probable cause hearing, if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, but that treatment in a less restrictive setting than detention is in the best interest of such person or others, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment for not to exceed ninety days.
(d) If the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder, is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and that the person does not present a likelihood of serious harm or grave disability, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment not to exceed ninety days, and may not order inpatient treatment.
(e) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The court shall specifically state to such person and give such person notice in writing that if involuntary treatment beyond the fourteen day period or beyond the ninety days of less restrictive treatment is to be sought, such person will have the right to a full hearing or jury trial as required by RCW 71.05.310. If the commitment is for mental health treatment, the court shall also state to the person and provide written notice that the person is barred from the possession of firearms and that the prohibition remains in effect until a court restores his or her right to possess a firearm under RCW 9.41.047.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 2 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 232, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Severability1992 c 168: See note following RCW 9.41.070.

71.05.240
Petition for involuntary treatment or alternative treatment—Probable cause hearing. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1) If a petition is filed for fourteen day involuntary treatment or ninety days of less restrictive alternative treatment, the court shall hold a probable cause hearing within seventy-two hours of the initial detention or involuntary outpatient evaluation of such person as determined in RCW 71.05.180. If requested by the person or his or her attorney, the hearing may be postponed for a period not to exceed forty-eight hours. The hearing may also be continued subject to the conditions set forth in RCW 71.05.210 or subject to the petitioner's showing of good cause for a period not to exceed twenty-four hours.
(2) If the petition is for mental health treatment, the court at the time of the probable cause hearing and before an order of commitment is entered shall inform the person both orally and in writing that the failure to make a good faith effort to seek voluntary treatment as provided in RCW 71.05.230 will result in the loss of his or her firearm rights if the person is subsequently detained for involuntary treatment under this section.
(3)(a) Subject to (b) of this subsection, at the conclusion of the probable cause hearing, if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, and, after considering less restrictive alternatives to involuntary detention and treatment, finds that no such alternatives are in the best interests of such person or others, the court shall order that such person be detained for involuntary treatment not to exceed fourteen days in a facility certified to provide treatment by the department.
(b) Commitment for up to fourteen days based on a substance use disorder must be to either a secure detoxification facility or an approved substance use disorder treatment program.
(c) At the conclusion of the probable cause hearing, if the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder or substance use disorder, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is gravely disabled, but that treatment in a less restrictive setting than detention is in the best interest of such person or others, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment for not to exceed ninety days.
(d) If the court finds by a preponderance of the evidence that such person, as the result of a mental disorder, is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, and that the person does not present a likelihood of serious harm or grave disability, the court shall order an appropriate less restrictive alternative course of treatment not to exceed ninety days, and may not order inpatient treatment.
(e) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The court shall specifically state to such person and give such person notice in writing that if involuntary treatment beyond the fourteen day period or beyond the ninety days of less restrictive treatment is to be sought, such person will have the right to a full hearing or jury trial as required by RCW 71.05.310. If the commitment is for mental health treatment, the court shall also state to the person and provide written notice that the person is barred from the possession of firearms and that the prohibition remains in effect until a court restores his or her right to possess a firearm under RCW 9.41.047.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Severability1992 c 168: See note following RCW 9.41.070.



71.05.245
Determination of grave disability, likelihood of serious harm, or need of assisted outpatient treatment—Use of recent history evidence.

(1) In making a determination of whether a person is gravely disabled, presents a likelihood of serious harm, or is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment in a hearing conducted under RCW 71.05.240 or 71.05.320, the court must consider the symptoms and behavior of the respondent in light of all available evidence concerning the respondent's historical behavior.
(2) Symptoms or behavior which standing alone would not justify civil commitment may support a finding of grave disability or likelihood of serious harm, or a finding that the person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment, when: (a) Such symptoms or behavior are closely associated with symptoms or behavior which preceded and led to a past incident of involuntary hospitalization, severe deterioration, or one or more violent acts; (b) these symptoms or behavior represent a marked and concerning change in the baseline behavior of the respondent; and (c) without treatment, the continued deterioration of the respondent is probable.
(3) In making a determination of whether there is a likelihood of serious harm in a hearing conducted under RCW 71.05.240 or 71.05.320, the court shall give great weight to any evidence before the court regarding whether the person has: (a) A recent history of one or more violent acts; or (b) a recent history of one or more commitments under this chapter or its equivalent provisions under the laws of another state which were based on a likelihood of serious harm. The existence of prior violent acts or commitments under this chapter or its equivalent shall not be the sole basis for determining whether a person presents a likelihood of serious harm.
For the purposes of this subsection "recent" refers to the period of time not exceeding three years prior to the current hearing.
NOTES:
Effective date2013 c 335; 2011 2nd sp.s. c 6; 2010 c 280 §§ 2 and 3: See note following RCW 71.05.212.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.260
Release from involuntary intensive treatment—Exception.

(1) Involuntary intensive treatment ordered at the time of the probable cause hearing shall be for no more than fourteen days, and shall terminate sooner when, in the opinion of the professional person in charge of the facility or his or her professional designee, (a) the person no longer constitutes a likelihood of serious harm, or (b) no longer is gravely disabled, or (c) is prepared to accept voluntary treatment upon referral, or (d) is to remain in the facility providing intensive treatment on a voluntary basis.
(2) A person who has been detained for fourteen days of intensive treatment shall be released at the end of the fourteen days unless one of the following applies: (a) Such person agrees to receive further treatment on a voluntary basis; or (b) such person is a patient to whom RCW 71.05.280 is applicable.



71.05.270
Temporary release.

Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit the professional person in charge of a treatment facility, or his or her professional designee, from permitting a person detained for intensive treatment to leave the facility for prescribed periods during the term of the person's detention, under such conditions as may be appropriate.



71.05.280
Additional commitment—Grounds. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

At the expiration of the fourteen-day period of intensive treatment, a person may be committed for further treatment pursuant to RCW 71.05.320 if:
(1) Such person after having been taken into custody for evaluation and treatment has threatened, attempted, or inflicted: (a) Physical harm upon the person of another or himself or herself, or substantial damage upon the property of another, and (b) as a result of mental disorder presents a likelihood of serious harm; or
(2) Such person was taken into custody as a result of conduct in which he or she attempted or inflicted physical harm upon the person of another or himself or herself, or substantial damage upon the property of others, and continues to present, as a result of mental disorder, a likelihood of serious harm; or
(3) Such person has been determined to be incompetent and criminal charges have been dismissed pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), and has committed acts constituting a felony, and as a result of a mental disorder, presents a substantial likelihood of repeating similar acts.
(a) In any proceeding pursuant to this subsection it shall not be necessary to show intent, willfulness, or state of mind as an element of the crime;
(b) For any person subject to commitment under this subsection where the charge underlying the finding of incompetence is for a felony classified as violent under RCW 9.94A.030, the court shall determine whether the acts the person committed constitute a violent offense under RCW 9.94A.030; or
(4) Such person is gravely disabled; or
(5) Such person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
NOTES:
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.280
Additional commitment—Grounds. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

At the expiration of the fourteen-day period of intensive treatment, a person may be committed for further treatment pursuant to RCW 71.05.320 if:
(1) Such person after having been taken into custody for evaluation and treatment has threatened, attempted, or inflicted: (a) Physical harm upon the person of another or himself or herself, or substantial damage upon the property of another, and (b) as a result of mental disorder or substance use disorder presents a likelihood of serious harm; or
(2) Such person was taken into custody as a result of conduct in which he or she attempted or inflicted physical harm upon the person of another or himself or herself, or substantial damage upon the property of others, and continues to present, as a result of mental disorder or substance use disorder, a likelihood of serious harm; or
(3) Such person has been determined to be incompetent and criminal charges have been dismissed pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), and has committed acts constituting a felony, and as a result of a mental disorder, presents a substantial likelihood of repeating similar acts.
(a) In any proceeding pursuant to this subsection it shall not be necessary to show intent, willfulness, or state of mind as an element of the crime;
(b) For any person subject to commitment under this subsection where the charge underlying the finding of incompetence is for a felony classified as violent under RCW 9.94A.030, the court shall determine whether the acts the person committed constitute a violent offense under RCW 9.94A.030; or
(4) Such person is gravely disabled; or
(5) Such person is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.285
Additional confinement—Prior history evidence.

In determining whether an inpatient or less restrictive alternative commitment under the process provided in RCW 71.05.280 and * 71.05.320(2) is appropriate, great weight shall be given to evidence of a prior history or pattern of decompensation and discontinuation of treatment resulting in: (1) Repeated hospitalizations; or (2) repeated peace officer interventions resulting in juvenile offenses, criminal charges, diversion programs, or jail admissions. Such evidence may be used to provide a factual basis for concluding that the individual would not receive, if released, such care as is essential for his or her health or safety.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2006 c 333 § 304, changing subsection (2) to subsection (3). RCW 71.05.320 was subsequently amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).



71.05.290
Petition for additional commitment—Affidavit. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) At any time during a person's fourteen day intensive treatment period, the professional person in charge of a treatment facility or his or her professional designee or the designated mental health professional may petition the superior court for an order requiring such person to undergo an additional period of treatment. Such petition must be based on one or more of the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280.
(2) The petition shall summarize the facts which support the need for further commitment and shall be supported by affidavits based on an examination of the patient and signed by:
(a) Two physicians;
(b) One physician and a mental health professional;
(c) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(d) One psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional. The affidavits shall describe in detail the behavior of the detained person which supports the petition and shall explain what, if any, less restrictive treatments which are alternatives to detention are available to such person, and shall state the willingness of the affiant to testify to such facts in subsequent judicial proceedings under this chapter. If less restrictive alternative treatment is sought, the petition shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services.
(3) If a person has been determined to be incompetent pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), then the professional person in charge of the treatment facility or his or her professional designee or the designated mental health professional may directly file a petition for one hundred eighty day treatment under RCW 71.05.280(3). No petition for initial detention or fourteen day detention is required before such a petition may be filed.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 3 and by 2016 c 155 § 6, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.290
Petition for additional commitment—Affidavit. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) At any time during a person's fourteen day intensive treatment period, the professional person in charge of a treatment facility or his or her professional designee or the designated crisis responder may petition the superior court for an order requiring such person to undergo an additional period of treatment. Such petition must be based on one or more of the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280.
(2) The petition shall summarize the facts which support the need for further commitment and shall be supported by affidavits based on an examination of the patient and signed by:
(a) Two physicians;
(b) One physician and a mental health professional;
(c) One physician assistant and a mental health professional; or
(d) One psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner and a mental health professional. The affidavits shall describe in detail the behavior of the detained person which supports the petition and shall explain what, if any, less restrictive treatments which are alternatives to detention are available to such person, and shall state the willingness of the affiant to testify to such facts in subsequent judicial proceedings under this chapter. If less restrictive alternative treatment is sought, the petition shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services.
(3) If a person has been determined to be incompetent pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), then the professional person in charge of the treatment facility or his or her professional designee or the designated crisis responder may directly file a petition for one hundred eighty day treatment under RCW 71.05.280(3). No petition for initial detention or fourteen day detention is required before such a petition may be filed.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 3, 2016 c 155 § 6, and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 235, each without reference to the other. All amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.300
Filing of petition—Appearance—Notice—Advice as to rights—Appointment of attorney, expert, or professional person. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) The petition for ninety day treatment shall be filed with the clerk of the superior court at least three days before expiration of the fourteen-day period of intensive treatment. At the time of filing such petition, the clerk shall set a time for the person to come before the court on the next judicial day after the day of filing unless such appearance is waived by the person's attorney, and the clerk shall notify the designated mental health professional. The designated mental health professional shall immediately notify the person detained, his or her attorney, if any, and his or her guardian or conservator, if any, the prosecuting attorney, and the behavioral health organization administrator, and provide a copy of the petition to such persons as soon as possible. The behavioral health organization administrator or designee may review the petition and may appear and testify at the full hearing on the petition.
(2) At the time set for appearance the detained person shall be brought before the court, unless such appearance has been waived and the court shall advise him or her of his or her right to be represented by an attorney, his or her right to a jury trial, and his or her loss of firearm rights if involuntarily committed. If the detained person is not represented by an attorney, or is indigent or is unwilling to retain an attorney, the court shall immediately appoint an attorney to represent him or her. The court shall, if requested, appoint a reasonably available licensed physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychologist, or psychiatrist, designated by the detained person to examine and testify on behalf of the detained person.
(3) The court may, if requested, also appoint a professional person as defined in RCW 71.05.020 to seek less restrictive alternative courses of treatment and to testify on behalf of the detained person. In the case of a person with a developmental disability who has been determined to be incompetent pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), then the appointed professional person under this section shall be a developmental disabilities professional.
(4) The court shall also set a date for a full hearing on the petition as provided in RCW 71.05.310.
NOTES:
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.300
Filing of petition—Appearance—Notice—Advice as to rights—Appointment of attorney, expert, or professional person. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) The petition for ninety day treatment shall be filed with the clerk of the superior court at least three days before expiration of the fourteen-day period of intensive treatment. At the time of filing such petition, the clerk shall set a time for the person to come before the court on the next judicial day after the day of filing unless such appearance is waived by the person's attorney, and the clerk shall notify the designated crisis responder. The designated crisis responder shall immediately notify the person detained, his or her attorney, if any, and his or her guardian or conservator, if any, the prosecuting attorney, and the behavioral health organization administrator, and provide a copy of the petition to such persons as soon as possible. The behavioral health organization administrator or designee may review the petition and may appear and testify at the full hearing on the petition.
(2) At the time set for appearance the detained person shall be brought before the court, unless such appearance has been waived and the court shall advise him or her of his or her right to be represented by an attorney, his or her right to a jury trial, and, if the petition is for commitment for mental health treatment, his or her loss of firearm rights if involuntarily committed. If the detained person is not represented by an attorney, or is indigent or is unwilling to retain an attorney, the court shall immediately appoint an attorney to represent him or her. The court shall, if requested, appoint a reasonably available licensed physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, psychologist, or psychiatrist, designated by the detained person to examine and testify on behalf of the detained person.
(3) The court may, if requested, also appoint a professional person as defined in RCW 71.05.020 to seek less restrictive alternative courses of treatment and to testify on behalf of the detained person. In the case of a person with a developmental disability who has been determined to be incompetent pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4), then the appointed professional person under this section shall be a developmental disabilities professional.
(4) The court shall also set a date for a full hearing on the petition as provided in RCW 71.05.310.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 7 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 236, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.310
Time for hearing—Due process—Jury trial—Continuation of treatment.

The court shall conduct a hearing on the petition for ninety-day treatment within five judicial days of the first court appearance after the probable cause hearing, or within ten judicial days for a petition filed under RCW 71.05.280(3). The court may continue the hearing for good cause upon the written request of the person named in the petition or the person's attorney. The court may continue for good cause the hearing on a petition filed under RCW 71.05.280(3) upon written request by the person named in the petition, the person's attorney, or the petitioner. If the person named in the petition requests a jury trial, the trial shall commence within ten judicial days of the first court appearance after the probable cause hearing. The burden of proof shall be by clear, cogent, and convincing evidence and shall be upon the petitioner. The person shall be present at such proceeding, which shall in all respects accord with the constitutional guarantees of due process of law and the rules of evidence pursuant to RCW 71.05.360 (8) and (9).
During the proceeding, the person named in the petition shall continue to be treated until released by order of the superior court. If no order has been made within thirty days after the filing of the petition, not including extensions of time requested by the detained person or his or her attorney, or the petitioner in the case of a petition filed under RCW 71.05.280(3), the detained person shall be released.
NOTES:
PurposeEffective date2012 c 256: See notes following RCW 10.77.068.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.



71.05.320
Remand for additional treatment—Less restrictive alternatives—Duration—Grounds—Hearing. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) If the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven and that the best interests of the person or others will not be served by a less restrictive treatment which is an alternative to detention, the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department for a further period of intensive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment. If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment in a facility certified for one hundred eighty day treatment by the department.
(2) If the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven, but finds that treatment less restrictive than detention will be in the best interest of the person or others, then the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department or to a less restrictive alternative for a further period of less restrictive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment. If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment. If the court or jury finds that the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(5) have been proven, and provide the only basis for commitment, the court must enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment for up to ninety days from the date of judgment and may not order inpatient treatment.
(3) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment entered under subsection (2) of this section must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The person shall be released from involuntary treatment at the expiration of the period of commitment imposed under subsection (1) or (2) of this section unless the superintendent or professional person in charge of the facility in which he or she is confined, or in the event of a less restrictive alternative, the designated mental health professional, files a new petition for involuntary treatment on the grounds that the committed person:
(a) During the current period of court ordered treatment: (i) Has threatened, attempted, or inflicted physical harm upon the person of another, or substantial damage upon the property of another, and (ii) as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability presents a likelihood of serious harm; or
(b) Was taken into custody as a result of conduct in which he or she attempted or inflicted serious physical harm upon the person of another, and continues to present, as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability a likelihood of serious harm; or
(c)(i) Is in custody pursuant to RCW 71.05.280(3) and as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability continues to present a substantial likelihood of repeating acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, when considering the person's life history, progress in treatment, and the public safety.
(ii) In cases under this subsection where the court has made an affirmative special finding under RCW 71.05.280(3)(b), the commitment shall continue for up to an additional one hundred eighty day period whenever the petition presents prima facie evidence that the person continues to suffer from a mental disorder or developmental disability that results in a substantial likelihood of committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, unless the person presents proof through an admissible expert opinion that the person's condition has so changed such that the mental disorder or developmental disability no longer presents a substantial likelihood of the person committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior. The initial or additional commitment period may include transfer to a specialized program of intensive support and treatment, which may be initiated prior to or after discharge from the state hospital; or
(d) Continues to be gravely disabled; or
(e) Is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
If the conduct required to be proven in (b) and (c) of this subsection was found by a judge or jury in a prior trial under this chapter, it shall not be necessary to prove such conduct again.
If less restrictive alternative treatment is sought, the petition shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services.
(5) A new petition for involuntary treatment filed under subsection (4) of this section shall be filed and heard in the superior court of the county of the facility which is filing the new petition for involuntary treatment unless good cause is shown for a change of venue. The cost of the proceedings shall be borne by the state.
(6)(a) The hearing shall be held as provided in RCW 71.05.310, and if the court or jury finds that the grounds for additional confinement as set forth in this section are present, the court may order the committed person returned for an additional period of treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, except as provided in subsection (7) of this section. If the court's order is based solely on the grounds identified in subsection (4)(e) of this section, the court may enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, and may not enter an order for inpatient treatment. An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(b) At the end of the one hundred eighty day period of commitment, or one-year period of commitment if subsection (7) of this section applies, the committed person shall be released unless a petition for an additional one hundred eighty day period of continued treatment is filed and heard in the same manner as provided in this section. Successive one hundred eighty day commitments are permissible on the same grounds and pursuant to the same procedures as the original one hundred eighty day commitment.
(7) An order for less restrictive treatment entered under subsection (6) of this section may be for up to one year when the person's previous commitment term was for intensive inpatient treatment in a state hospital.
(8) No person committed as provided in this section may be detained unless a valid order of commitment is in effect. No order of commitment can exceed one hundred eighty days in length except as provided in subsection (7) of this section.
NOTES:
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
FindingsIntent2015 c 250; 2009 c 323: "(1) The legislature finds that many persons who are released from involuntary mental health treatment in an inpatient setting would benefit from an order for less restrictive treatment in order to provide the structure and support necessary to facilitate long-term stability and success in the community.
(2) The legislature intends to make it easier to renew orders for less restrictive treatment following a period of inpatient commitment in cases in which a person has been involuntarily committed more than once and is likely to benefit from a renewed order for less restrictive treatment.
(3) The legislature finds that public safety is enhanced when a designated mental health professional is able to file a petition to revoke an order for less restrictive treatment under RCW 71.05.590 before a person who is the subject of the petition becomes ill enough to present a likelihood of serious harm." [ 2015 c 250 § 21; 2009 c 323 § 1.]
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.

71.05.320
Remand for additional treatment—Less restrictive alternatives—Duration—Grounds—Hearing. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1)(a) Subject to (b) of this subsection, if the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven and that the best interests of the person or others will not be served by a less restrictive treatment which is an alternative to detention, the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department for a further period of intensive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment.
(b) If the order for inpatient treatment is based on a substance use disorder, treatment must take place at an approved substance use disorder treatment program. The court may only enter an order for commitment based on a substance use disorder if there is an available approved substance use disorder treatment program with adequate space for the person.
(c) If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment in a facility certified for one hundred eighty day treatment by the department.
(2) If the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven, but finds that treatment less restrictive than detention will be in the best interest of the person or others, then the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department or to a less restrictive alternative for a further period of less restrictive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment. If the order for less restrictive treatment is based on a substance use disorder, treatment must be provided by an approved substance use disorder treatment program. If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment. If the court or jury finds that the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(5) have been proven, and provide the only basis for commitment, the court must enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment for up to ninety days from the date of judgment and may not order inpatient treatment.
(3) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment entered under subsection (2) of this section must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The person shall be released from involuntary treatment at the expiration of the period of commitment imposed under subsection (1) or (2) of this section unless the superintendent or professional person in charge of the facility in which he or she is confined, or in the event of a less restrictive alternative, the designated crisis responder, files a new petition for involuntary treatment on the grounds that the committed person:
(a) During the current period of court ordered treatment: (i) Has threatened, attempted, or inflicted physical harm upon the person of another, or substantial damage upon the property of another, and (ii) as a result of a mental disorder, substance use disorder, or developmental disability presents a likelihood of serious harm; or
(b) Was taken into custody as a result of conduct in which he or she attempted or inflicted serious physical harm upon the person of another, and continues to present, as a result of mental disorder, substance use disorder, or developmental disability a likelihood of serious harm; or
(c)(i) Is in custody pursuant to RCW 71.05.280(3) and as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability continues to present a substantial likelihood of repeating acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, when considering the person's life history, progress in treatment, and the public safety.
(ii) In cases under this subsection where the court has made an affirmative special finding under RCW 71.05.280(3)(b), the commitment shall continue for up to an additional one hundred eighty day period whenever the petition presents prima facie evidence that the person continues to suffer from a mental disorder or developmental disability that results in a substantial likelihood of committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, unless the person presents proof through an admissible expert opinion that the person's condition has so changed such that the mental disorder or developmental disability no longer presents a substantial likelihood of the person committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior. The initial or additional commitment period may include transfer to a specialized program of intensive support and treatment, which may be initiated prior to or after discharge from the state hospital; or
(d) Continues to be gravely disabled; or
(e) Is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
If the conduct required to be proven in (b) and (c) of this subsection was found by a judge or jury in a prior trial under this chapter, it shall not be necessary to prove such conduct again.
If less restrictive alternative treatment is sought, the petition shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services.
(5) A new petition for involuntary treatment filed under subsection (4) of this section shall be filed and heard in the superior court of the county of the facility which is filing the new petition for involuntary treatment unless good cause is shown for a change of venue. The cost of the proceedings shall be borne by the state.
(6)(a) The hearing shall be held as provided in RCW 71.05.310, and if the court or jury finds that the grounds for additional confinement as set forth in this section are present, subject to subsection (1)(b) of this section, the court may order the committed person returned for an additional period of treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, except as provided in subsection (7) of this section. If the court's order is based solely on the grounds identified in subsection (4)(e) of this section, the court may enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, and may not enter an order for inpatient treatment. An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(b) At the end of the one hundred eighty day period of commitment, or one-year period of commitment if subsection (7) of this section applies, the committed person shall be released unless a petition for an additional one hundred eighty day period of continued treatment is filed and heard in the same manner as provided in this section. Successive one hundred eighty day commitments are permissible on the same grounds and pursuant to the same procedures as the original one hundred eighty day commitment.
(7) An order for less restrictive treatment entered under subsection (6) of this section may be for up to one year when the person's previous commitment term was for intensive inpatient treatment in a state hospital.
(8) No person committed as provided in this section may be detained unless a valid order of commitment is in effect. No order of commitment can exceed one hundred eighty days in length except as provided in subsection (7) of this section.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 4 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 237, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
FindingsIntent2015 c 250; 2009 c 323: "(1) The legislature finds that many persons who are released from involuntary mental health treatment in an inpatient setting would benefit from an order for less restrictive treatment in order to provide the structure and support necessary to facilitate long-term stability and success in the community.
(2) The legislature intends to make it easier to renew orders for less restrictive treatment following a period of inpatient commitment in cases in which a person has been involuntarily committed more than once and is likely to benefit from a renewed order for less restrictive treatment.
(3) The legislature finds that public safety is enhanced when a designated mental health professional is able to file a petition to revoke an order for less restrictive treatment under RCW 71.05.590 before a person who is the subject of the petition becomes ill enough to present a likelihood of serious harm." [ 2015 c 250 § 21; 2009 c 323 § 1.]
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.

71.05.320
Remand for additional treatment—Less restrictive alternatives—Duration—Grounds—Hearing. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1) If the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven and that the best interests of the person or others will not be served by a less restrictive treatment which is an alternative to detention, the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department for a further period of intensive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment.
If the order for inpatient treatment is based on a substance use disorder, treatment must take place at an approved substance use disorder treatment program. If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment in a facility certified for one hundred eighty day treatment by the department.
(2) If the court or jury finds that grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280 have been proven, but finds that treatment less restrictive than detention will be in the best interest of the person or others, then the court shall remand him or her to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department or to a less restrictive alternative for a further period of less restrictive treatment not to exceed ninety days from the date of judgment. If the order for less restrictive treatment is based on a substance use disorder, treatment must be provided by an approved substance use disorder treatment program. If the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) are the basis of commitment, then the period of treatment may be up to but not exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment. If the court or jury finds that the grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(5) have been proven, and provide the only basis for commitment, the court must enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment for up to ninety days from the date of judgment and may not order inpatient treatment.
(3) An order for less restrictive alternative treatment entered under subsection (2) of this section must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(4) The person shall be released from involuntary treatment at the expiration of the period of commitment imposed under subsection (1) or (2) of this section unless the superintendent or professional person in charge of the facility in which he or she is confined, or in the event of a less restrictive alternative, the designated crisis responder, files a new petition for involuntary treatment on the grounds that the committed person:
(a) During the current period of court ordered treatment: (i) Has threatened, attempted, or inflicted physical harm upon the person of another, or substantial damage upon the property of another, and (ii) as a result of a mental disorder, substance use disorder, or developmental disability presents a likelihood of serious harm; or
(b) Was taken into custody as a result of conduct in which he or she attempted or inflicted serious physical harm upon the person of another, and continues to present, as a result of mental disorder, substance use disorder, or developmental disability a likelihood of serious harm; or
(c)(i) Is in custody pursuant to RCW 71.05.280(3) and as a result of mental disorder or developmental disability continues to present a substantial likelihood of repeating acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, when considering the person's life history, progress in treatment, and the public safety.
(ii) In cases under this subsection where the court has made an affirmative special finding under RCW 71.05.280(3)(b), the commitment shall continue for up to an additional one hundred eighty day period whenever the petition presents prima facie evidence that the person continues to suffer from a mental disorder or developmental disability that results in a substantial likelihood of committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior, unless the person presents proof through an admissible expert opinion that the person's condition has so changed such that the mental disorder or developmental disability no longer presents a substantial likelihood of the person committing acts similar to the charged criminal behavior. The initial or additional commitment period may include transfer to a specialized program of intensive support and treatment, which may be initiated prior to or after discharge from the state hospital; or
(d) Continues to be gravely disabled; or
(e) Is in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment.
If the conduct required to be proven in (b) and (c) of this subsection was found by a judge or jury in a prior trial under this chapter, it shall not be necessary to prove such conduct again.
If less restrictive alternative treatment is sought, the petition shall set forth any recommendations for less restrictive alternative treatment services.
(5) A new petition for involuntary treatment filed under subsection (4) of this section shall be filed and heard in the superior court of the county of the facility which is filing the new petition for involuntary treatment unless good cause is shown for a change of venue. The cost of the proceedings shall be borne by the state.
(6)(a) The hearing shall be held as provided in RCW 71.05.310, and if the court or jury finds that the grounds for additional confinement as set forth in this section are present, the court may order the committed person returned for an additional period of treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, except as provided in subsection (7) of this section. If the court's order is based solely on the grounds identified in subsection (4)(e) of this section, the court may enter an order for less restrictive alternative treatment not to exceed one hundred eighty days from the date of judgment, and may not enter an order for inpatient treatment. An order for less restrictive alternative treatment must name the mental health service provider responsible for identifying the services the person will receive in accordance with RCW 71.05.585, and must include a requirement that the person cooperate with the services planned by the mental health service provider.
(b) At the end of the one hundred eighty day period of commitment, or one-year period of commitment if subsection (7) of this section applies, the committed person shall be released unless a petition for an additional one hundred eighty day period of continued treatment is filed and heard in the same manner as provided in this section. Successive one hundred eighty day commitments are permissible on the same grounds and pursuant to the same procedures as the original one hundred eighty day commitment.
(7) An order for less restrictive treatment entered under subsection (6) of this section may be for up to one year when the person's previous commitment term was for intensive inpatient treatment in a state hospital.
(8) No person committed as provided in this section may be detained unless a valid order of commitment is in effect. No order of commitment can exceed one hundred eighty days in length except as provided in subsection (7) of this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
FindingsIntent2015 c 250; 2009 c 323: "(1) The legislature finds that many persons who are released from involuntary mental health treatment in an inpatient setting would benefit from an order for less restrictive treatment in order to provide the structure and support necessary to facilitate long-term stability and success in the community.
(2) The legislature intends to make it easier to renew orders for less restrictive treatment following a period of inpatient commitment in cases in which a person has been involuntarily committed more than once and is likely to benefit from a renewed order for less restrictive treatment.
(3) The legislature finds that public safety is enhanced when a designated mental health professional is able to file a petition to revoke an order for less restrictive treatment under RCW 71.05.590 before a person who is the subject of the petition becomes ill enough to present a likelihood of serious harm." [ 2015 c 250 § 21; 2009 c 323 § 1.]
FindingPurposeIntentSeverabilityPart headings not lawEffective dates2006 c 333: See notes following RCW 71.24.016.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.



71.05.325
Release—Authorized leave—Notice to prosecuting attorney. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) is released because a new petition for involuntary treatment has not been filed under *RCW 71.05.320(2), the superintendent, professional person, or designated mental health professional responsible for the decision whether to file a new petition shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, of the decision not to file a new petition for involuntary treatment. Notice shall be provided at least forty-five days before the period of commitment expires.
(2)(a) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) is permitted temporarily to leave a treatment facility pursuant to RCW 71.05.270 for any period of time without constant accompaniment by facility staff, the superintendent, professional person in charge of a treatment facility, or his or her professional designee shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of any county of the person's destination and the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed. The notice shall be provided at least forty-five days before the anticipated leave and shall describe the conditions under which the leave is to occur.
(b) The provisions of RCW 71.05.330(2) apply to proposed leaves, and either or both prosecuting attorneys receiving notice under this subsection may petition the court under RCW 71.05.330(2).
(3) Nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize detention of a person unless a valid order of commitment is in effect.
(4) The existence of the notice requirements in this section will not require any extension of the leave date in the event the leave plan changes after notification.
(5) The notice requirements contained in this section shall not apply to emergency medical transfers.
(6) The notice provisions of this section are in addition to those provided in RCW 71.05.425.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2006 c 333 § 304, changing subsection (2) to subsection (3). RCW 71.05.320 was subsequently amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).
FindingsIntent1994 c 129: See note following RCW 4.24.550.
Index, part headings not lawSeverabilityEffective datesApplication1990 c 3: See RCW 18.155.900 through 18.155.902.

71.05.325
Release—Authorized leave—Notice to prosecuting attorney. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) is released because a new petition for involuntary treatment has not been filed under *RCW 71.05.320(3), the superintendent, professional person, or designated crisis responder responsible for the decision whether to file a new petition shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, of the decision not to file a new petition for involuntary treatment. Notice shall be provided at least forty-five days before the period of commitment expires.
(2)(a) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) is permitted temporarily to leave a treatment facility pursuant to RCW 71.05.270 for any period of time without constant accompaniment by facility staff, the superintendent, professional person in charge of a treatment facility, or his or her professional designee shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of any county of the person's destination and the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed. The notice shall be provided at least forty-five days before the anticipated leave and shall describe the conditions under which the leave is to occur.
(b) The provisions of RCW 71.05.330(2) apply to proposed leaves, and either or both prosecuting attorneys receiving notice under this subsection may petition the court under RCW 71.05.330(2).
(3) Nothing in this section shall be construed to authorize detention of a person unless a valid order of commitment is in effect.
(4) The existence of the notice requirements in this section will not require any extension of the leave date in the event the leave plan changes after notification.
(5) The notice requirements contained in this section shall not apply to emergency medical transfers.
(6) The notice provisions of this section are in addition to those provided in RCW 71.05.425.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingsIntent1994 c 129: See note following RCW 4.24.550.
Index, part headings not lawSeverabilityEffective datesApplication1990 c 3: See RCW 18.155.900 through 18.155.902.



71.05.330
Early release—Notice to court and prosecuting attorney—Petition for hearing.

(1) Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility in which the person is being involuntarily treated from releasing him or her prior to the expiration of the commitment period when, in the opinion of the superintendent or professional person in charge, the person being involuntarily treated no longer presents a likelihood of serious harm.
Whenever the superintendent or professional person in charge of a hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment pursuant to this chapter releases a person prior to the expiration of the period of commitment, the superintendent or professional person in charge shall in writing notify the court which committed the person for treatment.
(2) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(2)(c) is released under this section, the superintendent or professional person in charge shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, of the release date. Notice shall be provided at least thirty days before the release date. Within twenty days after receiving notice, the prosecuting attorney may petition the court in the county in which the person is being involuntarily treated for a hearing to determine whether the person is to be released. The prosecuting attorney shall provide a copy of the petition to the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment, the attorney, if any, and the guardian or conservator of the committed person. The court shall conduct a hearing on the petition within ten days of filing the petition. The committed person shall have the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as for an involuntary treatment proceeding, except as set forth in this subsection and except that there shall be no right to jury trial. The issue to be determined at the hearing is whether or not the person may be released without substantial danger to other persons, or substantial likelihood of committing criminal acts jeopardizing public safety or security. If the court disapproves of the release, it may do so only on the basis of substantial evidence. Pursuant to the determination of the court upon the hearing, the committed person shall be released or shall be returned for involuntary treatment subject to release at the end of the period for which he or she was committed, or otherwise in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2006 c 333 § 304, changing subsection (2) to subsection (3). RCW 71.05.320 was subsequently amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.335
Modification of order for inpatient treatment—Intervention by prosecuting attorney.

In any proceeding under this chapter to modify a commitment order of a person committed to inpatient treatment under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(2)(c) in which the requested relief includes treatment less restrictive than detention, the prosecuting attorney shall be entitled to intervene. The party initiating the motion to modify the commitment order shall serve the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed with written notice and copies of the initiating papers.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2006 c 333 § 304, changing subsection (2) to subsection (3). RCW 71.05.320 was subsequently amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).



71.05.340
Outpatient treatment or care—Conditional release. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) When, in the opinion of the superintendent or the professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment, the committed person can be appropriately served by outpatient treatment prior to or at the expiration of the period of commitment, then such outpatient care may be required as a term of conditional release for a period which, when added to the inpatient treatment period, shall not exceed the period of commitment. If the facility or agency designated to provide outpatient treatment is other than the facility providing involuntary treatment, the outpatient facility so designated must agree in writing to assume such responsibility. A copy of the terms of conditional release shall be given to the patient, the designated mental health professional in the county in which the patient is to receive outpatient treatment, and to the court of original commitment.
(b) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) or 71.05.320(4)(c) is conditionally released under (a) of this subsection, the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, of the decision to conditionally release the person. Notice and a copy of the terms of conditional release shall be provided at least thirty days before the person is released from inpatient care. Within twenty days after receiving notice, the prosecuting attorney may petition the court in the county that issued the commitment order to hold a hearing to determine whether the person may be conditionally released and the terms of the conditional release. The prosecuting attorney shall provide a copy of the petition to the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment, the attorney, if any, and guardian or conservator of the committed person, and the court of original commitment. If the county in which the committed person is to receive outpatient treatment is the same county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, then the court shall, upon the motion of the prosecuting attorney, transfer the proceeding to the court in that county. The court shall conduct a hearing on the petition within ten days of the filing of the petition. The committed person shall have the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as for an involuntary treatment proceeding, except as set forth in this subsection and except that there shall be no right to jury trial. The issue to be determined at the hearing is whether or not the person may be conditionally released without substantial danger to other persons, or substantial likelihood of committing criminal acts jeopardizing public safety or security. If the court disapproves of the conditional release, it may do so only on the basis of substantial evidence. Pursuant to the determination of the court upon the hearing, the conditional release of the person shall be approved by the court on the same or modified conditions or the person shall be returned for involuntary treatment on an inpatient basis subject to release at the end of the period for which he or she was committed, or otherwise in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.
(2) The facility or agency designated to provide outpatient care or the secretary may modify the conditions for continued release when such modification is in the best interest of the person. Notification of such changes shall be sent to all persons receiving a copy of the original conditions. Enforcement or revocation proceedings related to a conditional release order may occur as provided under RCW 71.05.590.
NOTES:
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.340
Outpatient treatment or care—Conditional release. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) When, in the opinion of the superintendent or the professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment, the committed person can be appropriately served by outpatient treatment prior to or at the expiration of the period of commitment, then such outpatient care may be required as a term of conditional release for a period which, when added to the inpatient treatment period, shall not exceed the period of commitment. If the facility or agency designated to provide outpatient treatment is other than the facility providing involuntary treatment, the outpatient facility so designated must agree in writing to assume such responsibility. A copy of the terms of conditional release shall be given to the patient, the designated crisis responder in the county in which the patient is to receive outpatient treatment, and to the court of original commitment.
(b) Before a person committed under grounds set forth in RCW 71.05.280(3) or 71.05.320(4)(c) is conditionally released under (a) of this subsection, the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment shall in writing notify the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, of the decision to conditionally release the person. Notice and a copy of the terms of conditional release shall be provided at least thirty days before the person is released from inpatient care. Within twenty days after receiving notice, the prosecuting attorney may petition the court in the county that issued the commitment order to hold a hearing to determine whether the person may be conditionally released and the terms of the conditional release. The prosecuting attorney shall provide a copy of the petition to the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital or facility providing involuntary treatment, the attorney, if any, and guardian or conservator of the committed person, and the court of original commitment. If the county in which the committed person is to receive outpatient treatment is the same county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed, then the court shall, upon the motion of the prosecuting attorney, transfer the proceeding to the court in that county. The court shall conduct a hearing on the petition within ten days of the filing of the petition. The committed person shall have the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as for an involuntary treatment proceeding, except as set forth in this subsection and except that there shall be no right to jury trial. The issue to be determined at the hearing is whether or not the person may be conditionally released without substantial danger to other persons, or substantial likelihood of committing criminal acts jeopardizing public safety or security. If the court disapproves of the conditional release, it may do so only on the basis of substantial evidence. Pursuant to the determination of the court upon the hearing, the conditional release of the person shall be approved by the court on the same or modified conditions or the person shall be returned for involuntary treatment on an inpatient basis subject to release at the end of the period for which he or she was committed, or otherwise in accordance with the provisions of this chapter.
(2) The facility or agency designated to provide outpatient care or the secretary may modify the conditions for continued release when such modification is in the best interest of the person. Notification of such changes shall be sent to all persons receiving a copy of the original conditions. Enforcement or revocation proceedings related to a conditional release order may occur as provided under RCW 71.05.590.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.350
Assistance to released persons.

No indigent patient shall be conditionally released or discharged from involuntary treatment without suitable clothing, and the superintendent of a state hospital shall furnish the same, together with such sum of money as he or she deems necessary for the immediate welfare of the patient. Such sum of money shall be the same as the amount required by RCW 72.02.100 to be provided to persons in need being released from correctional institutions. As funds are available, the secretary may provide payment to indigent persons conditionally released pursuant to this chapter consistent with the optional provisions of RCW 72.02.100 and 72.02.110, and may adopt rules and regulations to do so.



71.05.360
Rights of involuntarily detained persons. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) Every person involuntarily detained or committed under the provisions of this chapter shall be entitled to all the rights set forth in this chapter, which shall be prominently posted in the facility, and shall retain all rights not denied him or her under this chapter except as chapter 9.41 RCW may limit the right of a person to purchase or possess a firearm or to qualify for a concealed pistol license.
(b) No person shall be presumed incompetent as a consequence of receiving an evaluation or voluntary or involuntary treatment for a mental disorder, under this chapter or any prior laws of this state dealing with mental illness. Competency shall not be determined or withdrawn except under the provisions of chapter 10.77 or 11.88 RCW.
(c) Any person who leaves a public or private agency following evaluation or treatment for mental disorder shall be given a written statement setting forth the substance of this section.
(2) Each person involuntarily detained or committed pursuant to this chapter shall have the right to adequate care and individualized treatment.
(3) The provisions of this chapter shall not be construed to deny to any person treatment by spiritual means through prayer in accordance with the tenets and practices of a church or religious denomination.
(4) Persons receiving evaluation or treatment under this chapter shall be given a reasonable choice of an available physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or other professional person qualified to provide such services.
(5) Whenever any person is detained for evaluation and treatment pursuant to this chapter, both the person and, if possible, a responsible member of his or her immediate family, personal representative, guardian, or conservator, if any, shall be advised as soon as possible in writing or orally, by the officer or person taking him or her into custody or by personnel of the evaluation and treatment facility where the person is detained that unless the person is released or voluntarily admits himself or herself for treatment within seventy-two hours of the initial detention:
(a) A judicial hearing in a superior court, either by a judge or court commissioner thereof, shall be held not more than seventy-two hours after the initial detention to determine whether there is probable cause to detain the person after the seventy-two hours have expired for up to an additional fourteen days without further automatic hearing for the reason that the person is a person whose mental disorder presents a likelihood of serious harm or that the person is gravely disabled;
(b) The person has a right to communicate immediately with an attorney; has a right to have an attorney appointed to represent him or her before and at the probable cause hearing if he or she is indigent; and has the right to be told the name and address of the attorney that the mental health professional has designated pursuant to this chapter;
(c) The person has the right to remain silent and that any statement he or she makes may be used against him or her;
(d) The person has the right to present evidence and to cross-examine witnesses who testify against him or her at the probable cause hearing; and
(e) The person has the right to refuse psychiatric medications, including antipsychotic medication beginning twenty-four hours prior to the probable cause hearing.
(6) When proceedings are initiated under RCW 71.05.153, no later than twelve hours after such person is admitted to the evaluation and treatment facility the personnel of the evaluation and treatment facility or the designated mental health professional shall serve on such person a copy of the petition for initial detention and the name, business address, and phone number of the designated attorney and shall forthwith commence service of a copy of the petition for initial detention on the designated attorney.
(7) The judicial hearing described in subsection (5) of this section is hereby authorized, and shall be held according to the provisions of subsection (5) of this section and rules promulgated by the supreme court.
(8) At the probable cause hearing the detained person shall have the following rights in addition to the rights previously specified:
(a) To present evidence on his or her behalf;
(b) To cross-examine witnesses who testify against him or her;
(c) To be proceeded against by the rules of evidence;
(d) To remain silent;
(e) To view and copy all petitions and reports in the court file.
(9) Privileges between patients and physicians, physician assistants, psychologists, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioners are deemed waived in proceedings under this chapter relating to the administration of antipsychotic medications. As to other proceedings under this chapter, the privileges shall be waived when a court of competent jurisdiction in its discretion determines that such waiver is necessary to protect either the detained person or the public.
The waiver of a privilege under this section is limited to records or testimony relevant to evaluation of the detained person for purposes of a proceeding under this chapter. Upon motion by the detained person or on its own motion, the court shall examine a record or testimony sought by a petitioner to determine whether it is within the scope of the waiver.
The record maker shall not be required to testify in order to introduce medical or psychological records of the detained person so long as the requirements of RCW 5.45.020 are met except that portions of the record which contain opinions as to the detained person's mental state must be deleted from such records unless the person making such conclusions is available for cross-examination.
(10) Insofar as danger to the person or others is not created, each person involuntarily detained, treated in a less restrictive alternative course of treatment, or committed for treatment and evaluation pursuant to this chapter shall have, in addition to other rights not specifically withheld by law, the following rights:
(a) To wear his or her own clothes and to keep and use his or her own personal possessions, except when deprivation of same is essential to protect the safety of the resident or other persons;
(b) To keep and be allowed to spend a reasonable sum of his or her own money for canteen expenses and small purchases;
(c) To have access to individual storage space for his or her private use;
(d) To have visitors at reasonable times;
(e) To have reasonable access to a telephone, both to make and receive confidential calls, consistent with an effective treatment program;
(f) To have ready access to letter writing materials, including stamps, and to send and receive uncensored correspondence through the mails;
(g) To discuss treatment plans and decisions with professional persons;
(h) Not to consent to the administration of antipsychotic medications and not to thereafter be administered antipsychotic medications unless ordered by a court under RCW 71.05.217 or pursuant to an administrative hearing under RCW 71.05.215;
(i) Not to consent to the performance of electroconvulsant therapy or surgery, except emergency lifesaving surgery, unless ordered by a court under RCW 71.05.217;
(j) Not to have psychosurgery performed on him or her under any circumstances;
(k) To dispose of property and sign contracts unless such person has been adjudicated an incompetent in a court proceeding directed to that particular issue.
(11) Every person involuntarily detained shall immediately be informed of his or her right to a hearing to review the legality of his or her detention and of his or her right to counsel, by the professional person in charge of the facility providing evaluation and treatment, or his or her designee, and, when appropriate, by the court. If the person so elects, the court shall immediately appoint an attorney to assist him or her.
(12) A person challenging his or her detention or his or her attorney shall have the right to designate and have the court appoint a reasonably available independent physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed mental health professional to examine the person detained, the results of which examination may be used in the proceeding. The person shall, if he or she is financially able, bear the cost of such expert examination, otherwise such expert examination shall be at public expense.
(13) Nothing contained in this chapter shall prohibit the patient from petitioning by writ of habeas corpus for release.
(14) Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit a person committed on or prior to January 1, 1974, from exercising a right available to him or her at or prior to January 1, 1974, for obtaining release from confinement.
(15) Nothing in this section permits any person to knowingly violate a no-contact order or a condition of an active judgment and sentence or an active condition of supervision by the department of corrections.
NOTES:
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.

71.05.360
Rights of involuntarily detained persons. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) Every person involuntarily detained or committed under the provisions of this chapter shall be entitled to all the rights set forth in this chapter, which shall be prominently posted in the facility, and shall retain all rights not denied him or her under this chapter except as chapter 9.41 RCW may limit the right of a person to purchase or possess a firearm or to qualify for a concealed pistol license if the person is committed under RCW 71.05.240 or 71.05.320 for mental health treatment.
(b) No person shall be presumed incompetent as a consequence of receiving an evaluation or voluntary or involuntary treatment for a mental disorder or substance use disorder, under this chapter or any prior laws of this state dealing with mental illness or substance use disorders. Competency shall not be determined or withdrawn except under the provisions of chapter 10.77 or 11.88 RCW.
(c) Any person who leaves a public or private agency following evaluation or treatment for a mental disorder or substance use disorder shall be given a written statement setting forth the substance of this section.
(2) Each person involuntarily detained or committed pursuant to this chapter shall have the right to adequate care and individualized treatment.
(3) The provisions of this chapter shall not be construed to deny to any person treatment by spiritual means through prayer in accordance with the tenets and practices of a church or religious denomination.
(4) Persons receiving evaluation or treatment under this chapter shall be given a reasonable choice of an available physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or other professional person qualified to provide such services.
(5) Whenever any person is detained for evaluation and treatment pursuant to this chapter, both the person and, if possible, a responsible member of his or her immediate family, personal representative, guardian, or conservator, if any, shall be advised as soon as possible in writing or orally, by the officer or person taking him or her into custody or by personnel of the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program where the person is detained that unless the person is released or voluntarily admits himself or herself for treatment within seventy-two hours of the initial detention:
(a) A judicial hearing in a superior court, either by a judge or court commissioner thereof, shall be held not more than seventy-two hours after the initial detention to determine whether there is probable cause to detain the person after the seventy-two hours have expired for up to an additional fourteen days without further automatic hearing for the reason that the person is a person whose mental disorder or substance use disorder presents a likelihood of serious harm or that the person is gravely disabled;
(b) The person has a right to communicate immediately with an attorney; has a right to have an attorney appointed to represent him or her before and at the probable cause hearing if he or she is indigent; and has the right to be told the name and address of the attorney that the mental health professional has designated pursuant to this chapter;
(c) The person has the right to remain silent and that any statement he or she makes may be used against him or her;
(d) The person has the right to present evidence and to cross-examine witnesses who testify against him or her at the probable cause hearing; and
(e) The person has the right to refuse psychiatric medications, including antipsychotic medication beginning twenty-four hours prior to the probable cause hearing.
(6) When proceedings are initiated under RCW 71.05.153, no later than twelve hours after such person is admitted to the evaluation and treatment facility, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program the personnel of the facility or the designated crisis responder shall serve on such person a copy of the petition for initial detention and the name, business address, and phone number of the designated attorney and shall forthwith commence service of a copy of the petition for initial detention on the designated attorney.
(7) The judicial hearing described in subsection (5) of this section is hereby authorized, and shall be held according to the provisions of subsection (5) of this section and rules promulgated by the supreme court.
(8) At the probable cause hearing the detained person shall have the following rights in addition to the rights previously specified:
(a) To present evidence on his or her behalf;
(b) To cross-examine witnesses who testify against him or her;
(c) To be proceeded against by the rules of evidence;
(d) To remain silent;
(e) To view and copy all petitions and reports in the court file.
(9) Privileges between patients and physicians, physician assistants, psychologists, or psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioners are deemed waived in proceedings under this chapter relating to the administration of antipsychotic medications. As to other proceedings under this chapter, the privileges shall be waived when a court of competent jurisdiction in its discretion determines that such waiver is necessary to protect either the detained person or the public.
The waiver of a privilege under this section is limited to records or testimony relevant to evaluation of the detained person for purposes of a proceeding under this chapter. Upon motion by the detained person or on its own motion, the court shall examine a record or testimony sought by a petitioner to determine whether it is within the scope of the waiver.
The record maker shall not be required to testify in order to introduce medical or psychological records of the detained person so long as the requirements of RCW 5.45.020 are met except that portions of the record which contain opinions as to the detained person's mental state must be deleted from such records unless the person making such conclusions is available for cross-examination.
(10) Insofar as danger to the person or others is not created, each person involuntarily detained, treated in a less restrictive alternative course of treatment, or committed for treatment and evaluation pursuant to this chapter shall have, in addition to other rights not specifically withheld by law, the following rights:
(a) To wear his or her own clothes and to keep and use his or her own personal possessions, except when deprivation of same is essential to protect the safety of the resident or other persons;
(b) To keep and be allowed to spend a reasonable sum of his or her own money for canteen expenses and small purchases;
(c) To have access to individual storage space for his or her private use;
(d) To have visitors at reasonable times;
(e) To have reasonable access to a telephone, both to make and receive confidential calls, consistent with an effective treatment program;
(f) To have ready access to letter writing materials, including stamps, and to send and receive uncensored correspondence through the mails;
(g) To discuss treatment plans and decisions with professional persons;
(h) Not to consent to the administration of antipsychotic medications and not to thereafter be administered antipsychotic medications unless ordered by a court under RCW 71.05.217 or pursuant to an administrative hearing under RCW 71.05.215;
(i) Not to consent to the performance of electroconvulsant therapy or surgery, except emergency lifesaving surgery, unless ordered by a court under RCW 71.05.217;
(j) Not to have psychosurgery performed on him or her under any circumstances;
(k) To dispose of property and sign contracts unless such person has been adjudicated an incompetent in a court proceeding directed to that particular issue.
(11) Every person involuntarily detained shall immediately be informed of his or her right to a hearing to review the legality of his or her detention and of his or her right to counsel, by the professional person in charge of the facility providing evaluation and treatment, or his or her designee, and, when appropriate, by the court. If the person so elects, the court shall immediately appoint an attorney to assist him or her.
(12) A person challenging his or her detention or his or her attorney shall have the right to designate and have the court appoint a reasonably available independent physician, physician assistant, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or licensed mental health professional to examine the person detained, the results of which examination may be used in the proceeding. The person shall, if he or she is financially able, bear the cost of such expert examination, otherwise such expert examination shall be at public expense.
(13) Nothing contained in this chapter shall prohibit the patient from petitioning by writ of habeas corpus for release.
(14) Nothing in this chapter shall prohibit a person committed on or prior to January 1, 1974, from exercising a right available to him or her at or prior to January 1, 1974, for obtaining release from confinement.
(15) Nothing in this section permits any person to knowingly violate a no-contact order or a condition of an active judgment and sentence or an active condition of supervision by the department of corrections.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 8 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 244, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingsPurposeConstructionSeverability2007 c 375: See notes following RCW 10.31.110.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.



71.05.365
Involuntary commitment—Individualized discharge plan. (Effective July 1, 2018.)

When a person has been involuntarily committed for treatment to a hospital for a period of ninety or one hundred eighty days, and the superintendent or professional person in charge of the hospital determines that the person no longer requires active psychiatric treatment at an inpatient level of care, the behavioral health organization, full integration entity under RCW 71.24.380, or agency providing oversight of long-term care or developmental disability services that is responsible for resource management services for the person must work with the hospital to develop an individualized discharge plan and arrange for a transition to the community in accordance with the person's individualized discharge plan within fourteen days of the determination.
NOTES:
Effective date2016 1st sp.s. c 37 § 15: "Section 15 of this act takes effect July 1, 2018." [ 2016 1st sp.s. c 37 § 16.]
Effective date2014 c 225 § 85: "Section 85 of this act takes effect July 1, 2018." [ 2014 c 225 § 113.]
Effective date2013 c 338 § 4: "Section 4 of this act takes effect July 1, 2018." [ 2013 c 338 § 8.]



71.05.380
Rights of voluntarily committed persons. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

All persons voluntarily entering or remaining in any facility, institution, or hospital providing evaluation and treatment for mental disorder shall have no less than all rights secured to involuntarily detained persons by RCW 71.05.360 and * 71.05.370.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: RCW 71.05.370 was recodified as RCW 71.05.217 pursuant to 2005 c 504 § 108, effective July 1, 2005.

71.05.380
Rights of voluntarily committed persons. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

All persons voluntarily entering or remaining in any facility, institution, or hospital providing evaluation and treatment for mental disorders or substance use disorders shall have no less than all rights secured to involuntarily detained persons by RCW 71.05.360 and 71.05.217.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.425
Persons committed following dismissal of sex, violent, or felony harassment offense—Notification of conditional release, final release, leave, transfer, or escape—To whom given—Definitions.

(1)(a) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, at the earliest possible date, and in no event later than thirty days before conditional release, final release, authorized leave under RCW 71.05.325(2), or transfer to a facility other than a state mental hospital, the superintendent shall send written notice of conditional release, release, authorized leave, or transfer of a person committed under RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(3)(c) following dismissal of a sex, violent, or felony harassment offense pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4) to the following:
(i) The chief of police of the city, if any, in which the person will reside;
(ii) The sheriff of the county in which the person will reside; and
(iii) The prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed.
(b) The same notice as required by (a) of this subsection shall be sent to the following, if such notice has been requested in writing about a specific person committed under RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(3)(c) following dismissal of a sex, violent, or felony harassment offense pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4):
(i) The victim of the sex, violent, or felony harassment offense that was dismissed pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4) preceding commitment under RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(3)(c) or the victim's next of kin if the crime was a homicide;
(ii) Any witnesses who testified against the person in any court proceedings;
(iii) Any person specified in writing by the prosecuting attorney. Information regarding victims, next of kin, or witnesses requesting the notice, information regarding any other person specified in writing by the prosecuting attorney to receive the notice, and the notice are confidential and shall not be available to the person committed under this chapter; and
(iv) The chief of police of the city, if any, and the sheriff of the county, if any, which had jurisdiction of the person on the date of the applicable offense.
(c) The thirty-day notice requirements contained in this subsection shall not apply to emergency medical transfers.
(d) The existence of the notice requirements in this subsection will not require any extension of the release date in the event the release plan changes after notification.
(2) If a person committed under RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(3)(c) following dismissal of a sex, violent, or felony harassment offense pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4) escapes, the superintendent shall immediately notify, by the most reasonable and expedient means available, the chief of police of the city and the sheriff of the county in which the person escaped and in which the person resided immediately before the person's arrest and the prosecuting attorney of the county in which the criminal charges against the committed person were dismissed. If previously requested, the superintendent shall also notify the witnesses and the victim of the sex, violent, or felony harassment offense that was dismissed pursuant to RCW 10.77.086(4) preceding commitment under RCW 71.05.280(3) or * 71.05.320(3) or the victim's next of kin if the crime was a homicide. In addition, the secretary shall also notify appropriate parties pursuant to RCW 70.02.230(2)(n). If the person is recaptured, the superintendent shall send notice to the persons designated in this subsection as soon as possible but in no event later than two working days after the department learns of such recapture.
(3) If the victim, the victim's next of kin, or any witness is under the age of sixteen, the notice required by this section shall be sent to the parent or legal guardian of the child.
(4) The superintendent shall send the notices required by this chapter to the last address provided to the department by the requesting party. The requesting party shall furnish the department with a current address.
(5) For purposes of this section the following terms have the following meanings:
(a) "Violent offense" means a violent offense under RCW 9.94A.030;
(b) "Sex offense" means a sex offense under RCW 9.94A.030;
(c) "Next of kin" means a person's spouse, state registered domestic partner, parents, siblings, and children;
(d) "Felony harassment offense" means a crime of harassment as defined in RCW 9A.46.060 that is a felony.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: *(1) RCW 71.05.320 was amended by 2015 c 250 § 11, changing subsection (3) to subsection (4).
(2) This section was amended by 2013 c 200 § 30 and by 2013 c 289 § 6, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Findings2013 c 289: See note following RCW 10.77.086.
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
Findings2011 c 305: See note following RCW 74.09.295.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.
FindingsIntent1994 c 129: See note following RCW 4.24.550.
Severability1992 c 186: See note following RCW 9A.46.110.
Index, part headings not lawSeverabilityEffective datesApplication1990 c 3: See RCW 18.155.900 through 18.155.902.



71.05.435
Discharge of person from evaluation and treatment facility or state hospital—Notice to designated mental health professional office. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Whenever a person who is the subject of an involuntary commitment order under this chapter is discharged from an evaluation and treatment facility or state hospital, the evaluation and treatment facility or state hospital shall provide notice of the person's discharge to the designated mental health professional office responsible for the initial commitment and the designated mental health professional office that serves the county in which the person is expected to reside. The evaluation and treatment facility or state hospital must also provide these offices with a copy of any less restrictive order or conditional release order entered in conjunction with the discharge of the person, unless the evaluation and treatment facility or state hospital has entered into a memorandum of understanding obligating another entity to provide these documents.
(2) The notice and documents referred to in subsection (1) of this section shall be provided as soon as possible and no later than one business day following the discharge of the person. Notice is not required under this section if the discharge is for the purpose of transferring the person for continued detention and treatment under this chapter at another treatment facility.
(3) The department shall maintain and make available an updated list of contact information for designated mental health professional offices around the state.

71.05.435
Discharge of person from treatment entity—Notice to designated crisis responder office. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Whenever a person who is the subject of an involuntary commitment order under this chapter is discharged from an evaluation and treatment facility, state hospital, secure detoxification facility, or approved substance use disorder treatment program providing involuntary treatment services, the entity discharging the person shall provide notice of the person's discharge to the designated crisis responder office responsible for the initial commitment and the designated crisis responder office that serves the county in which the person is expected to reside. The entity discharging the person must also provide these offices with a copy of any less restrictive order or conditional release order entered in conjunction with the discharge of the person, unless the entity discharging the person has entered into a memorandum of understanding obligating another entity to provide these documents.
(2) The notice and documents referred to in subsection (1) of this section shall be provided as soon as possible and no later than one business day following the discharge of the person. Notice is not required under this section if the discharge is for the purpose of transferring the person for continued detention and treatment under this chapter at another treatment facility.
(3) The department shall maintain and make available an updated list of contact information for designated crisis responder offices around the state.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.445
Court-ordered mental health treatment of persons subject to department of corrections supervision—Initial assessment inquiry—Required notifications—Rules.

(1)(a) When a mental health service provider conducts its initial assessment for a person receiving court-ordered treatment, the service provider shall inquire and shall be told by the offender whether he or she is subject to supervision by the department of corrections.
(b) When a person receiving court-ordered treatment or treatment ordered by the department of corrections discloses to his or her mental health service provider that he or she is subject to supervision by the department of corrections, the mental health service provider shall notify the department of corrections that he or she is treating the offender and shall notify the offender that his or her community corrections officer will be notified of the treatment, provided that if the offender has received relief from disclosure pursuant to RCW 9.94A.562, * 70.96A.155, or 71.05.132 and the offender has provided the mental health service provider with a copy of the order granting relief from disclosure pursuant to RCW 9.94A.562, * 70.96A.155, or 71.05.132, the mental health service provider is not required to notify the department of corrections that the mental health service provider is treating the offender. The notification may be written or oral and shall not require the consent of the offender. If an oral notification is made, it must be confirmed by a written notification. For purposes of this section, a written notification includes notification by email or facsimile, so long as the notifying mental health service provider is clearly identified.
(2) The information to be released to the department of corrections shall include all relevant records and reports, as defined by rule, necessary for the department of corrections to carry out its duties.
(3) The department and the department of corrections, in consultation with behavioral health organizations, mental health service providers as defined in RCW 71.05.020, mental health consumers, and advocates for persons with mental illness, shall adopt rules to implement the provisions of this section related to the type and scope of information to be released. These rules shall:
(a) Enhance and facilitate the ability of the department of corrections to carry out its responsibility of planning and ensuring community protection with respect to persons subject to sentencing under chapter 9.94A or 9.95 RCW, including accessing and releasing or disclosing information of persons who received mental health services as a minor; and
(b) Establish requirements for the notification of persons under the supervision of the department of corrections regarding the provisions of this section.
(4) The information received by the department of corrections under this section shall remain confidential and subject to the limitations on disclosure outlined in chapter 71.05 RCW, except as provided in RCW 72.09.585.
(5) No mental health service provider or individual employed by a mental health service provider shall be held responsible for information released to or used by the department of corrections under the provisions of this section or rules adopted under this section.
(6) Whenever federal law or federal regulations restrict the release of information and records related to mental health services for any patient who receives treatment for alcoholism or drug dependency, the release of the information may be restricted as necessary to comply with federal law and regulations.
(7) This section does not modify the terms and conditions of disclosure of information related to sexually transmitted diseases under chapter 70.24 RCW.
(8) The department shall, subject to available resources, electronically, or by the most cost-effective means available, provide the department of corrections with the names, last dates of services, and addresses of specific behavioral health organizations and mental health service providers that delivered mental health services to a person subject to chapter 9.94A or 9.95 RCW pursuant to an agreement between the departments.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: *(1) RCW 70.96A.155 was repealed by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 301, effective April 1, 2018.
(2) This section was amended by 2014 c 220 § 14 and by 2014 c 225 § 86, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Effective date2014 c 220: See note following RCW 70.02.290.
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
Conflict with federal requirements2009 c 320: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
SeverabilityEffective dates2004 c 166: See notes following RCW 71.05.040.
Intent2000 c 75: "It is the intent of the legislature to enhance and facilitate the ability of the department of corrections to carry out its responsibility of planning and ensuring community protection with respect to persons subject to sentencing under chapter 9.94A RCW by authorizing access to, and release or disclosure of, necessary information related to mental health services. This includes accessing and releasing or disclosing information of persons who received mental health services as a minor. The legislature does not intend this act to readdress access to information and records regarding continuity of care.
The legislature recognizes that persons with mental illness have a right to the confidentiality of information related to mental health services, including the fact of their receiving such services, unless there is a state interest that supersedes this right. It is the intent of the legislature to balance that right of the individual with the state interest to enhance public safety." [ 2000 c 75 § 1.]



71.05.455
Law enforcement referrals to mental health agencies—Reports of threatened or attempted suicide—Model policy.

When funded, the Washington association of sheriffs and police chiefs, in consultation with the criminal justice training commission, must develop and adopt a model policy for use by law enforcement agencies relating to a law enforcement officer's referral of a person to a mental health agency after receiving a report of threatened or attempted suicide. The model policy must complement the criminal justice training commission's crisis intervention training curriculum.
NOTES:
FindingIntent2016 c 158: "The legislature finds that law enforcement officers may respond to situations in which an individual has threatened harm to himself or herself, but that individual does not meet the criteria to be taken into custody for an evaluation under the involuntary treatment act. In these situations, officers are encouraged to facilitate contact between the individual and a mental health professional in order to protect the individual and the community. While the legislature acknowledges that some law enforcement officers receive mental health training, law enforcement officers are not mental health professionals. It is the intent of the legislature that mental health incidents are addressed by mental health professionals." [ 2016 c 158 § 1.]



71.05.457
Law enforcement referrals to mental health agencies—Reports of threatened or attempted suicide—General authority law enforcement policy.

By July 1, 2017, all general authority Washington law enforcement agencies must adopt a policy establishing criteria and procedures for a law enforcement officer to refer a person to a mental health agency after receiving a report of threatened or attempted suicide.
NOTES:
FindingIntent2016 c 158: See note following RCW 71.05.455.



71.05.458
Law enforcement referral—Threatened or attempted suicide—Contact by mental health professional.

As soon as possible, but no later than twenty-four hours from receiving a referral from a law enforcement officer or law enforcement agency, excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and holidays, a mental health professional contacted by the *designated mental health professional agency must attempt to contact the referred person to determine whether additional mental health intervention is necessary including, if needed, an assessment by a *designated mental health professional for initial detention under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153. Documentation of the mental health professional's attempt to contact and assess the person must be maintained by the *designated mental health professional agency.
NOTES:
*Reviser's note: The term "designated mental health professional" as defined in RCW 71.05.020 was changed to "designated crisis responder" by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 204, effective April 1, 2018.
FindingIntent2016 c 158: See note following RCW 71.05.455.



71.05.500
Liability of applicant.

Any person making or filing an application alleging that a person should be involuntarily detained, certified, committed, treated, or evaluated pursuant to this chapter shall not be rendered civilly or criminally liable where the making and filing of such application was in good faith.



71.05.510
Damages for excessive detention.

Any individual who knowingly, wilfully or through gross negligence violates the provisions of this chapter by detaining a person for more than the allowable number of days shall be liable to the person detained in civil damages. It shall not be a prerequisite to an action under this section that the plaintiff shall have suffered or be threatened with special, as contrasted with general damages.



71.05.520
Protection of rights—Staff.

The department of social and health services shall have the responsibility to determine whether all rights of individuals recognized and guaranteed by the provisions of this chapter and the Constitutions of the state of Washington and the United States are in fact protected and effectively secured. To this end, the department shall assign appropriate staff who shall from time to time as may be necessary have authority to examine records, inspect facilities, attend proceedings, and do whatever is necessary to monitor, evaluate, and assure adherence to such rights. Such persons shall also recommend such additional safeguards or procedures as may be appropriate to secure individual rights set forth in this chapter and as guaranteed by the state and federal Constitutions.



71.05.525
Transfer of person committed to juvenile correction institution to institution or facility for juveniles with mental illnesses.

When, in the judgment of the department, the welfare of any person committed to or confined in any state juvenile correctional institution or facility necessitates that such a person be transferred or moved for observation, diagnosis or treatment to any state institution or facility for the care of mentally ill juveniles the secretary, or his or her designee, is authorized to order and effect such move or transfer: PROVIDED, HOWEVER, That the secretary shall adopt and implement procedures to assure that persons so transferred shall, while detained or confined in such institution or facility for the care of mentally ill juveniles, be provided with substantially similar opportunities for parole or early release evaluation and determination as persons detained or confined in state juvenile correctional institutions or facilities: PROVIDED, FURTHER, That the secretary shall notify the original committing court of such transfer.



71.05.530
Facilities part of comprehensive mental health program. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

Evaluation and treatment facilities authorized pursuant to this chapter may be part of the comprehensive community mental health services program conducted in counties pursuant to chapter 71.24 RCW, and may receive funding pursuant to the provisions thereof.
NOTES:
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.530
Facilities part of comprehensive mental health program. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

Evaluation and treatment facilities and secure detoxification facilities authorized pursuant to this chapter may be part of the comprehensive community mental health services program conducted in counties pursuant to chapter 71.24 RCW, and may receive funding pursuant to the provisions thereof.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.560
Adoption of rules. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

The department shall adopt such rules as may be necessary to effectuate the intent and purposes of this chapter, which shall include but not be limited to evaluation of the quality of the program and facilities operating pursuant to this chapter, evaluation of the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of such programs and facilities, and procedures and standards for certification and other action relevant to evaluation and treatment facilities.
NOTES:
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.560
Adoption of rules. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

The department shall adopt such rules as may be necessary to effectuate the intent and purposes of this chapter, which shall include but not be limited to evaluation of the quality of the program and facilities operating pursuant to this chapter, evaluation of the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of such programs and facilities, and procedures and standards for certification and other action relevant to evaluation and treatment facilities, secure detoxification facilities, and approved substance use disorder treatment programs.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective datesSeverabilityIntent1998 c 297: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.570
Rules of court.

The supreme court of the state of Washington shall adopt such rules as it shall deem necessary with respect to the court procedures and proceedings provided for by this chapter.



71.05.575
Less restrictive alternative treatment—Consideration by court.

(1) When making a decision under this chapter whether to require a less restrictive alternative treatment, the court shall consider whether it is appropriate to include or exclude time spent in confinement when determining whether the person has committed a recent overt act.
(2) When determining whether an offender is a danger to himself or herself or others under this chapter, a court shall give great weight to any evidence submitted to the court regarding an offender's recent history of judicially required or administratively ordered involuntary antipsychotic medication while in confinement.
NOTES:
IntentEffective date1999 c 214: See notes following RCW 72.09.370.



71.05.585
Less restrictive alternative treatment. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) Less restrictive alternative treatment, at a minimum, includes the following services:
(a) Assignment of a care coordinator;
(b) An intake evaluation with the provider of the less restrictive alternative treatment;
(c) A psychiatric evaluation;
(d) Medication management;
(e) A schedule of regular contacts with the provider of the less restrictive alternative treatment services for the duration of the order;
(f) A transition plan addressing access to continued services at the expiration of the order; and
(g) An individual crisis plan.
(2) Less restrictive alternative treatment may additionally include requirements to participate in the following services:
(a) Psychotherapy;
(b) Nursing;
(c) Substance abuse counseling;
(d) Residential treatment; and
(e) Support for housing, benefits, education, and employment.
(3) Less restrictive alternative treatment must be administered by a provider that is certified or licensed to provide or coordinate the full scope of services required under the less restrictive alternative order and that has agreed to assume this responsibility.
(4) The care coordinator assigned to a person ordered to less restrictive alternative treatment must submit an individualized plan for the person's treatment services to the court that entered the order. An initial plan must be submitted as soon as possible following the intake evaluation and a revised plan must be submitted upon any subsequent modification in which a type of service is removed from or added to the treatment plan.
(5) For the purpose of this section, "care coordinator" means a clinical practitioner who coordinates the activities of less restrictive alternative treatment. The care coordinator coordinates activities with the designated mental health professionals necessary for enforcement and continuation of less restrictive alternative orders and is responsible for coordinating service activities with other agencies and establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship with the individual on a continuing basis.

71.05.585
Less restrictive alternative treatment. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) Less restrictive alternative treatment, at a minimum, includes the following services:
(a) Assignment of a care coordinator;
(b) An intake evaluation with the provider of the less restrictive alternative treatment;
(c) A psychiatric evaluation;
(d) Medication management;
(e) A schedule of regular contacts with the provider of the less restrictive alternative treatment services for the duration of the order;
(f) A transition plan addressing access to continued services at the expiration of the order; and
(g) An individual crisis plan.
(2) Less restrictive alternative treatment may additionally include requirements to participate in the following services:
(a) Psychotherapy;
(b) Nursing;
(c) Substance abuse counseling;
(d) Residential treatment; and
(e) Support for housing, benefits, education, and employment.
(3) Less restrictive alternative treatment must be administered by a provider that is certified or licensed to provide or coordinate the full scope of services required under the less restrictive alternative order and that has agreed to assume this responsibility.
(4) The care coordinator assigned to a person ordered to less restrictive alternative treatment must submit an individualized plan for the person's treatment services to the court that entered the order. An initial plan must be submitted as soon as possible following the intake evaluation and a revised plan must be submitted upon any subsequent modification in which a type of service is removed from or added to the treatment plan.
(5) For the purpose of this section, "care coordinator" means a clinical practitioner who coordinates the activities of less restrictive alternative treatment. The care coordinator coordinates activities with the designated crisis responders that are necessary for enforcement and continuation of less restrictive alternative orders and is responsible for coordinating service activities with other agencies and establishing and maintaining a therapeutic relationship with the individual on a continuing basis.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 45 § 5 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 241, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.590
Less restrictive alternative or conditional release orders—Enforcement, modification, or revocation. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) An agency or facility designated to monitor or provide services under a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or a designated mental health professional may take action to enforce, modify, or revoke a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order if the agency, facility, or designated mental health professional determines that:
(a) The person is failing to adhere to the terms and conditions of the court order;
(b) Substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred;
(c) There is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further evaluation, intervention, or treatment; or
(d) The person poses a likelihood of serious harm.
(2) Actions taken under this section must include a flexible range of responses of varying levels of intensity appropriate to the circumstances and consistent with the interests of the individual and the public in personal autonomy, safety, recovery, and compliance. Available actions may include, but are not limited to, any of the following:
(a) To counsel, advise, or admonish the person as to their rights and responsibilities under the court order, and to offer appropriate incentives to motivate compliance;
(b) To increase the intensity of outpatient services provided to the person by increasing the frequency of contacts with the provider, referring the person for an assessment for assertive community services, or by other means;
(c) To request a court hearing for review and modification of the court order. The request must be made to the court with jurisdiction over the order and specify the circumstances that give rise to the request and what modification is being sought. The county prosecutor shall assist the agency or facility in requesting this hearing and issuing an appropriate summons to the person. This subsection does not limit the inherent authority of a treatment provider to alter conditions of treatment for clinical reasons, and is intended to be used only when court intervention is necessary or advisable to secure the person's compliance and prevent decompensation or deterioration;
(d) To cause the person to be transported by a peace officer, designated mental health professional, or other means to the agency or facility monitoring or providing services under the court order, or to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, emergency department, or evaluation and treatment facility for up to twelve hours for the purpose of an evaluation to determine whether modification, revocation, or commitment proceedings are necessary and appropriate to stabilize the person and prevent decompensation, deterioration, or physical harm. Temporary detention for evaluation under this subsection is intended to occur only following a pattern of noncompliance or the failure of reasonable attempts at outreach and engagement, and may occur only when in the clinical judgment of a designated mental health professional or the professional person in charge of an agency or facility designated to monitor less restrictive alternative services temporary detention is appropriate. This subsection does not limit the ability or obligation to pursue revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section in appropriate circumstances; and
(e) To initiate revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section.
(3) The facility or agency designated to provide outpatient treatment shall notify the secretary or designated mental health professional when a person fails to adhere to terms and conditions of court ordered treatment or experiences substantial deterioration in his or her condition and, as a result, presents an increased likelihood of serious harm.
(4)(a) A designated mental health professional or the secretary may upon their own motion or notification by the facility or agency designated to provide outpatient care order a person subject to a court order under this section to be apprehended and taken into custody and temporary detention in an evaluation and treatment facility in or near the county in which he or she is receiving outpatient treatment, or initiate proceedings under this subsection (4) without ordering the apprehension and detention of the person.
(b) A person detained under this subsection (4) must be held until such time, not exceeding five days, as a hearing can be scheduled to determine whether or not the person should be returned to the hospital or facility from which he or she had been released. If the person is not detained, the hearing must be scheduled within five days of service on the person. The designated mental health professional or the secretary may modify or rescind the order at any time prior to commencement of the court hearing.
(c) The designated mental health professional or secretary shall notify the court that originally ordered commitment within two judicial days of a person's detention and file a revocation petition and order of apprehension and detention with the court and serve the person and their attorney, guardian, and conservator, if any. The person has the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as in any involuntary treatment proceeding, except as specifically set forth in this section. There is no right to jury trial. The venue for proceedings regarding a petition for modification or revocation must be in the county in which the petition was filed.
(d) The issues for the court to determine are whether: (i) The person adhered to the terms and conditions of the court order; (ii) substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred; (iii) there is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further inpatient treatment; or (iv) there is a likelihood of serious harm; and, if any of the above conditions apply, whether the court should reinstate or modify the person's less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or order the person's detention for inpatient treatment. The person may waive the court hearing and allow the court to enter a stipulated order upon the agreement of all parties. If the court orders detention for inpatient treatment, the treatment period may be for no longer than the period authorized in the original court order.
(e) Revocation proceedings under this subsection (4) are not allowable if the current commitment is solely based on the person being in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment. In order to obtain a court order for detention for inpatient treatment under this circumstance, a petition must be filed under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153.
(5) In determining whether or not to take action under this section the designated mental health professional, agency, or facility must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.212 and the court must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.245 as they apply to the question of whether to enforce, modify, or revoke a court order for involuntary treatment.

71.05.590
Less restrictive alternative or conditional release orders—Enforcement, modification, or revocation. (Effective April 1, 2018, until July 1, 2026.)

(1) An agency or facility designated to monitor or provide services under a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or a designated crisis responder may take action to enforce, modify, or revoke a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order if the agency, facility, or designated crisis responder determines that:
(a) The person is failing to adhere to the terms and conditions of the court order;
(b) Substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred;
(c) There is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further evaluation, intervention, or treatment; or
(d) The person poses a likelihood of serious harm.
(2) Actions taken under this section must include a flexible range of responses of varying levels of intensity appropriate to the circumstances and consistent with the interests of the individual and the public in personal autonomy, safety, recovery, and compliance. Available actions may include, but are not limited to, any of the following:
(a) To counsel, advise, or admonish the person as to their rights and responsibilities under the court order, and to offer appropriate incentives to motivate compliance;
(b) To increase the intensity of outpatient services provided to the person by increasing the frequency of contacts with the provider, referring the person for an assessment for assertive community services, or by other means;
(c) To request a court hearing for review and modification of the court order. The request must be made to the court with jurisdiction over the order and specify the circumstances that give rise to the request and what modification is being sought. The county prosecutor shall assist the agency or facility in requesting this hearing and issuing an appropriate summons to the person. This subsection does not limit the inherent authority of a treatment provider to alter conditions of treatment for clinical reasons, and is intended to be used only when court intervention is necessary or advisable to secure the person's compliance and prevent decompensation or deterioration;
(d) To cause the person to be transported by a peace officer, designated crisis responder, or other means to the agency or facility monitoring or providing services under the court order, or to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, emergency department, or to an evaluation and treatment facility if the person is committed for mental health treatment, or to a secure detoxification facility with available space or an approved substance use disorder treatment program with available space if the person is committed for substance use disorder treatment. The person may be detained at the facility for up to twelve hours for the purpose of an evaluation to determine whether modification, revocation, or commitment proceedings are necessary and appropriate to stabilize the person and prevent decompensation, deterioration, or physical harm. Temporary detention for evaluation under this subsection is intended to occur only following a pattern of noncompliance or the failure of reasonable attempts at outreach and engagement, and may occur only when in the clinical judgment of a designated crisis responder or the professional person in charge of an agency or facility designated to monitor less restrictive alternative services temporary detention is appropriate. This subsection does not limit the ability or obligation to pursue revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section in appropriate circumstances; and
(e) To initiate revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section.
(3) The facility or agency designated to provide outpatient treatment shall notify the secretary or designated crisis responder when a person fails to adhere to terms and conditions of court ordered treatment or experiences substantial deterioration in his or her condition and, as a result, presents an increased likelihood of serious harm.
(4)(a) A designated crisis responder or the secretary may upon their own motion or notification by the facility or agency designated to provide outpatient care order a person subject to a court order under this chapter to be apprehended and taken into custody and temporary detention in an evaluation and treatment facility in or near the county in which he or she is receiving outpatient treatment if the person is committed for mental health treatment, or, if the person is committed for substance use disorder treatment, in a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program if either is available in or near the county in which he or she is receiving outpatient treatment and has adequate space. Proceedings under this subsection (4) may be initiated without ordering the apprehension and detention of the person.
(b) A person detained under this subsection (4) must be held until such time, not exceeding five days, as a hearing can be scheduled to determine whether or not the person should be returned to the hospital or facility from which he or she had been released. If the person is not detained, the hearing must be scheduled within five days of service on the person. The designated crisis responder or the secretary may modify or rescind the order at any time prior to commencement of the court hearing.
(c) The designated crisis responder or secretary shall notify the court that originally ordered commitment within two judicial days of a person's detention and file a revocation petition and order of apprehension and detention with the court and serve the person and their attorney, guardian, and conservator, if any. The person has the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as in any involuntary treatment proceeding, except as specifically set forth in this section. There is no right to jury trial. The venue for proceedings regarding a petition for modification or revocation must be in the county in which the petition was filed.
(d) The issues for the court to determine are whether: (i) The person adhered to the terms and conditions of the court order; (ii) substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred; (iii) there is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further inpatient treatment; or (iv) there is a likelihood of serious harm; and, if any of the above conditions apply, whether the court should reinstate or modify the person's less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or order the person's detention for inpatient treatment. The person may waive the court hearing and allow the court to enter a stipulated order upon the agreement of all parties. If the court orders detention for inpatient treatment, the treatment period may be for no longer than the period authorized in the original court order. A court may not issue an order to detain a person for inpatient treatment in a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program under this subsection unless there is a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program available and with adequate space for the person.
(e) Revocation proceedings under this subsection (4) are not allowable if the current commitment is solely based on the person being in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment. In order to obtain a court order for detention for inpatient treatment under this circumstance, a petition must be filed under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153.
(5) In determining whether or not to take action under this section the designated crisis responder, agency, or facility must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.212 and the court must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.245 as they apply to the question of whether to enforce, modify, or revoke a court order for involuntary treatment.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.590
Less restrictive alternative or conditional release orders—Enforcement, modification, or revocation. (Effective July 1, 2026.)

(1) An agency or facility designated to monitor or provide services under a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or a designated crisis responder may take action to enforce, modify, or revoke a less restrictive alternative or conditional release order if the agency, facility, or designated crisis responder determines that:
(a) The person is failing to adhere to the terms and conditions of the court order;
(b) Substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred;
(c) There is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further evaluation, intervention, or treatment; or
(d) The person poses a likelihood of serious harm.
(2) Actions taken under this section must include a flexible range of responses of varying levels of intensity appropriate to the circumstances and consistent with the interests of the individual and the public in personal autonomy, safety, recovery, and compliance. Available actions may include, but are not limited to, any of the following:
(a) To counsel, advise, or admonish the person as to their rights and responsibilities under the court order, and to offer appropriate incentives to motivate compliance;
(b) To increase the intensity of outpatient services provided to the person by increasing the frequency of contacts with the provider, referring the person for an assessment for assertive community services, or by other means;
(c) To request a court hearing for review and modification of the court order. The request must be made to the court with jurisdiction over the order and specify the circumstances that give rise to the request and what modification is being sought. The county prosecutor shall assist the agency or facility in requesting this hearing and issuing an appropriate summons to the person. This subsection does not limit the inherent authority of a treatment provider to alter conditions of treatment for clinical reasons, and is intended to be used only when court intervention is necessary or advisable to secure the person's compliance and prevent decompensation or deterioration;
(d) To cause the person to be transported by a peace officer, designated crisis responder, or other means to the agency or facility monitoring or providing services under the court order, or to a triage facility, crisis stabilization unit, emergency department, or to an evaluation and treatment facility if the person is committed for mental health treatment, or to a secure detoxification facility or an approved substance use disorder treatment program if the person is committed for substance use disorder treatment. The person may be detained at the facility for up to twelve hours for the purpose of an evaluation to determine whether modification, revocation, or commitment proceedings are necessary and appropriate to stabilize the person and prevent decompensation, deterioration, or physical harm. Temporary detention for evaluation under this subsection is intended to occur only following a pattern of noncompliance or the failure of reasonable attempts at outreach and engagement, and may occur only when in the clinical judgment of a designated crisis responder or the professional person in charge of an agency or facility designated to monitor less restrictive alternative services temporary detention is appropriate. This subsection does not limit the ability or obligation to pursue revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section in appropriate circumstances; and
(e) To initiate revocation procedures under subsection (4) of this section.
(3) The facility or agency designated to provide outpatient treatment shall notify the secretary or designated crisis responder when a person fails to adhere to terms and conditions of court ordered treatment or experiences substantial deterioration in his or her condition and, as a result, presents an increased likelihood of serious harm.
(4)(a) A designated crisis responder or the secretary may upon their own motion or notification by the facility or agency designated to provide outpatient care order a person subject to a court order under this chapter to be apprehended and taken into custody and temporary detention in an evaluation and treatment facility in or near the county in which he or she is receiving outpatient treatment if the person is committed for mental health treatment, or, if the person is committed for substance use disorder treatment, in a secure detoxification facility or approved substance use disorder treatment program if either is available in or near the county in which he or she is receiving outpatient treatment. Proceedings under this subsection (4) may be initiated without ordering the apprehension and detention of the person.
(b) A person detained under this subsection (4) must be held until such time, not exceeding five days, as a hearing can be scheduled to determine whether or not the person should be returned to the hospital or facility from which he or she had been released. If the person is not detained, the hearing must be scheduled within five days of service on the person. The designated crisis responder or the secretary may modify or rescind the order at any time prior to commencement of the court hearing.
(c) The designated crisis responder or secretary shall notify the court that originally ordered commitment within two judicial days of a person's detention and file a revocation petition and order of apprehension and detention with the court and serve the person and their attorney, guardian, and conservator, if any. The person has the same rights with respect to notice, hearing, and counsel as in any involuntary treatment proceeding, except as specifically set forth in this section. There is no right to jury trial. The venue for proceedings regarding a petition for modification or revocation must be in the county in which the petition was filed.
(d) The issues for the court to determine are whether: (i) The person adhered to the terms and conditions of the court order; (ii) substantial deterioration in the person's functioning has occurred; (iii) there is evidence of substantial decompensation with a reasonable probability that the decompensation can be reversed by further inpatient treatment; or (iv) there is a likelihood of serious harm; and, if any of the above conditions apply, whether the court should reinstate or modify the person's less restrictive alternative or conditional release order or order the person's detention for inpatient treatment. The person may waive the court hearing and allow the court to enter a stipulated order upon the agreement of all parties. If the court orders detention for inpatient treatment, the treatment period may be for no longer than the period authorized in the original court order.
(e) Revocation proceedings under this subsection (4) are not allowable if the current commitment is solely based on the person being in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment. In order to obtain a court order for detention for inpatient treatment under this circumstance, a petition must be filed under RCW 71.05.150 or 71.05.153.
(5) In determining whether or not to take action under this section the designated crisis responder, agency, or facility must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.212 and the court must consider the factors specified under RCW 71.05.245 as they apply to the question of whether to enforce, modify, or revoke a court order for involuntary treatment.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.595
Less restrictive alternative treatment order—Termination.

A court order for less restrictive alternative treatment for a person found to be in need of assisted outpatient mental health treatment must be terminated prior to the expiration of the order when, in the opinion of the professional person in charge of the less restrictive alternative treatment provider, (1) the person is prepared to accept voluntary treatment, or (2) the outpatient treatment ordered is no longer necessary to prevent a relapse, decompensation, or deterioration that is likely to result in the person presenting a likelihood of serious harm or the person becoming gravely disabled within a reasonably short period of time.



71.05.620
Court files and records closed—Exceptions—Rules. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) The files and records of court proceedings under this chapter and chapters 70.96A, 71.34, and 70.96B RCW shall be closed but shall be accessible to:
(a) The department;
(b) The state hospitals as defined in RCW 72.23.010;
(c) Any person who is the subject of a petition;
(d) The person's attorney or guardian;
(e) Resource management services for that person; and
(f) Service providers authorized to receive such information by resource management services.
(2) The department shall adopt rules to implement this section.
NOTES:
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Contingent effective date1989 c 205 §§ 11-19: "Sections 10 [11] through 19 of this act shall take effect on July 1, 1995, or when regional support networks are established." [ 1989 c 205 § 24.] See note following chapter digest.

71.05.620
Court files and records closed—Exceptions—Rules. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) The files and records of court proceedings under this chapter and chapter 71.34 RCW shall be closed but shall be accessible to:
(a) The department;
(b) The state hospitals as defined in RCW 72.23.010;
(c) Any person who is the subject of a petition;
(d) The attorney or guardian of the person;
(e) Resource management services for that person; and
(f) Service providers authorized to receive such information by resource management services.
(2) The department shall adopt rules to implement this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Contingent effective date1989 c 205 §§ 11-19: "Sections 10 [11] through 19 of this act shall take effect on July 1, 1995, or when regional support networks are established." [ 1989 c 205 § 24.] See note following chapter digest.



71.05.660
Treatment records—Privileged communications unaffected. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

Nothing in this chapter or chapter 70.02, 70.96A, 71.34, or 70.96B RCW shall be construed to interfere with communications between physicians, physician assistants, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioners, or psychologists and patients and attorneys and clients.
NOTES:
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Contingent effective date1989 c 205 §§ 11-19: See note following RCW 71.05.620.

71.05.660
Treatment records—Privileged communications unaffected. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

Nothing in this chapter or chapter 70.02 or 71.34 RCW shall be construed to interfere with communications between physicians, physician assistants, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioners, or psychologists and patients and attorneys and clients.
NOTES:
Reviser's note: This section was amended by 2016 c 155 § 9 and by 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 420, each without reference to the other. Both amendments are incorporated in the publication of this section under RCW 1.12.025(2). For rule of construction, see RCW 1.12.025(1).
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Contingent effective date1989 c 205 §§ 11-19: See note following RCW 71.05.620.



71.05.680
Treatment records—Access under false pretenses, penalty.

Any person who requests or obtains confidential information pursuant to RCW 71.05.620 under false pretenses shall be guilty of a gross misdemeanor.
NOTES:
Effective date2013 c 200: See note following RCW 70.02.010.
FindingsIntentSeverabilityApplicationConstructionCaptions, part headings, subheadings not lawAdoption of rulesEffective dates2005 c 504: See notes following RCW 71.05.027.
AlphabetizationCorrection of references2005 c 504: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.
Contingent effective date1989 c 205 §§ 11-19: See note following RCW 71.05.620.



71.05.700
Home visit by designated mental health professional or crisis intervention worker—Accompaniment by second trained individual. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

No designated mental health professional or crisis intervention worker shall be required to respond to a private home or other private location to stabilize or treat a person in crisis, or to evaluate a person for potential detention under the state's involuntary treatment act, unless a second trained individual, determined by the clinical team supervisor, on-call supervisor, or individual professional acting alone based on a risk assessment for potential violence, accompanies them. The second individual may be a law enforcement officer, a mental health professional, a mental health paraprofessional who has received training under RCW 71.05.715, or other first responder, such as fire or ambulance personnel. No retaliation may be taken against a worker who, following consultation with the clinical team, refuses to go on a home visit alone.
NOTES:
Findings2007 c 360: "The legislature finds that designated mental health professionals go out into the community to evaluate people for potential detention under the state's involuntary treatment act. Also, designated mental health professionals and other mental health workers do crisis intervention work intended to stabilize a person in crisis and provide immediate treatment and intervention in communities throughout Washington state. In many cases, the presence of a second trained individual on outreach to a person's private home or other private location will enhance safety for consumers, families, and mental health professionals and will advance the legislature's interest in quality mental health care services." [ 2007 c 360 § 1.]
Short title2007 c 360: "This act may be known and cited as the Marty Smith law." [ 2007 c 360 § 7.]

71.05.700
Home visit by designated crisis responder or crisis intervention worker—Accompaniment by second trained individual. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

No designated crisis responder or crisis intervention worker shall be required to respond to a private home or other private location to stabilize or treat a person in crisis, or to evaluate a person for potential detention under the state's involuntary treatment act, unless a second trained individual, determined by the clinical team supervisor, on-call supervisor, or individual professional acting alone based on a risk assessment for potential violence, accompanies them. The second individual may be a law enforcement officer, a mental health professional, a mental health paraprofessional who has received training under RCW 71.05.715, or other first responder, such as fire or ambulance personnel. No retaliation may be taken against a worker who, following consultation with the clinical team, refuses to go on a home visit alone.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Findings2007 c 360: "The legislature finds that designated mental health professionals go out into the community to evaluate people for potential detention under the state's involuntary treatment act. Also, designated mental health professionals and other mental health workers do crisis intervention work intended to stabilize a person in crisis and provide immediate treatment and intervention in communities throughout Washington state. In many cases, the presence of a second trained individual on outreach to a person's private home or other private location will enhance safety for consumers, families, and mental health professionals and will advance the legislature's interest in quality mental health care services." [ 2007 c 360 § 1.]
Short title2007 c 360: "This act may be known and cited as the Marty Smith law." [ 2007 c 360 § 7.]



71.05.705
Provider of designated mental health professional or crisis outreach services—Policy for home visits. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

Each provider of designated mental health professional or crisis outreach services shall maintain a written policy that, at a minimum, describes the organization's plan for training, staff backup, information sharing, and communication for crisis outreach staff who respond to private homes or nonpublic settings.
NOTES:
FindingsShort title2007 c 360: See notes following RCW 71.05.700.

71.05.705
Provider of designated crisis responder or crisis outreach services—Policy for home visits. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

Each provider of designated crisis responder or crisis outreach services shall maintain a written policy that, at a minimum, describes the organization's plan for training, staff backup, information sharing, and communication for crisis outreach staff who respond to private homes or nonpublic settings.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
FindingsShort title2007 c 360: See notes following RCW 71.05.700.



71.05.710
Home visit by mental health professional—Wireless telephone to be provided.

Any mental health professional who engages in home visits to clients shall be provided by their employer with a wireless telephone or comparable device for the purpose of emergency communication.
NOTES:
FindingsShort title2007 c 360: See notes following RCW 71.05.700.



71.05.715
Crisis visit by mental health professional—Access to information.

Any mental health professional who is dispatched on a crisis visit, as described in RCW 71.05.700, shall have prompt access to information about any history of dangerousness or potential dangerousness on the client they are being sent to evaluate that is documented in crisis plans or commitment records and is available without unduly delaying a crisis response.
NOTES:
FindingsShort title2007 c 360: See notes following RCW 71.05.700.



71.05.720
Training for community mental health employees.

Annually, all community mental health employees who work directly with clients shall be provided with training on safety and violence prevention topics described in RCW 49.19.030. The curriculum for the training shall be developed collaboratively among the department of social and health services, contracted mental health providers, and employee organizations that represent community mental health workers.
NOTES:
FindingsShort title2007 c 360: See notes following RCW 71.05.700.



71.05.730
Judicial services—Civil commitment cases—Reimbursement.

(1) A county may apply to its behavioral health organization on a quarterly basis for reimbursement of its direct costs in providing judicial services for civil commitment cases under this chapter and chapter 71.34 RCW. The behavioral health organization shall in turn be entitled to reimbursement from the behavioral health organization that serves the county of residence of the individual who is the subject of the civil commitment case. Reimbursements under this section shall be paid out of the behavioral health organization's nonmedicaid appropriation.
(2) Reimbursement for judicial services shall be provided per civil commitment case at a rate to be determined based on an independent assessment of the county's actual direct costs. This assessment must be based on an average of the expenditures for judicial services within the county over the past three years. In the event that a baseline cannot be established because there is no significant history of similar cases within the county, the reimbursement rate shall be equal to eighty percent of the median reimbursement rate of counties included in the independent assessment.
(3) For the purposes of this section:
(a) "Civil commitment case" includes all judicial hearings related to a single episode of hospitalization or less restrictive alternative treatment, except that the filing of a petition for a one hundred eighty-day commitment under this chapter or a petition for a successive one hundred eighty-day commitment under chapter 71.34 RCW shall be considered to be a new case regardless of whether there has been a break in detention. "Civil commitment case" does not include the filing of a petition for a one hundred eighty-day commitment under this chapter on behalf of a patient at a state psychiatric hospital.
(b) "Judicial services" means a county's reasonable direct costs in providing prosecutor services, assigned counsel and defense services, court services, and court clerk services for civil commitment cases under this chapter and chapter 71.34 RCW.
(4) To the extent that resources have shared purpose, the behavioral health organization may only reimburse counties to the extent such resources are necessary for and devoted to judicial services as described in this section.
(5) No filing fee may be charged or collected for any civil commitment case subject to reimbursement under this section.
[ 2015 c 250 § 15; (2015 c 250 § 14 expired April 1, 2016); 2014 c 225 § 87; 2011 c 343 § 2.]
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 250 §§ 2, 15, and 19: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Expiration date2015 c 250 §§ 1, 14, and 18: See note following RCW 71.05.020.
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.
Intent2011 c 343: "The legislature recognizes that counties that host evaluation and treatment beds incur costs by providing judicial services associated with civil commitments under chapters 71.05 and 71.34 RCW. Because evaluation and treatment beds are not evenly distributed across the state, these commitments frequently occur in a different county from the county in which the person was originally detained. The intent of this act is to create a process for the state to reimburse counties through the regional support networks for the counties' reasonable direct costs incurred in providing these judicial services, and to prevent the burden of these costs from falling disproportionately on the counties or regional support networks in which the commitments are most likely to occur. The legislature recognizes that the costs of judicial services may vary across the state based on different factors and conditions." [ 2011 c 343 § 1.]
Effective date2011 c 343: "Except for section 3 of this act, this act takes effect July 1, 2012." [ 2011 c 343 § 10.]



71.05.732
Reimbursement for judicial services—Assessment.

(1) The joint legislative audit and review committee shall conduct an independent assessment of the direct costs of providing judicial services under this chapter and chapter 71.34 RCW as defined in RCW 71.05.730. The assessment shall include a review and analysis of the reasons for differences in costs among counties. The assessment shall be conducted for any county in which more than twenty civil commitment cases were conducted during the year prior to the study. The assessment must be completed by June 1, 2012.
(2) The administrative office of the courts and the department shall provide the joint legislative audit and review committee with assistance and data required to complete the assessment.
(3) The joint legislative audit and review committee shall present recommendations as to methods for updating the costs identified in the assessment to reflect changes over time.
NOTES:
Intent2011 c 343: See note following RCW 71.05.730.



71.05.740
Reporting of commitment data.

By August 1, 2013, all behavioral health organizations in the state of Washington must forward historical mental health involuntary commitment information retained by the organization including identifying information and dates of commitment to the department. As soon as feasible, the behavioral health organizations must arrange to report new commitment data to the department within twenty-four hours. Commitment information under this section does not need to be resent if it is already in the possession of the department. Behavioral health organizations and the department shall be immune from liability related to the sharing of commitment information under this section.
NOTES:
Effective date2014 c 225: See note following RCW 71.24.016.



71.05.745
Single bed certification. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) The department may use a single bed certification process as outlined in rule to provide additional treatment capacity for a person suffering from a mental disorder for whom an evaluation and treatment bed is not available. The facility that is the proposed site of the single bed certification must be a facility that is willing and able to provide the person with timely and appropriate treatment either directly or by arrangement with other public or private agencies.
(2) A single bed certification must be specific to the patient receiving treatment.
(3) A designated mental health professional who submits an application for a single bed certification for treatment at a facility that is willing and able to provide timely and appropriate mental health treatment in good faith belief that the single bed certification is appropriate may presume that the single bed certification will be approved for the purpose of completing the detention process and responding to other emergency calls.
(4) The department may adopt rules implementing this section and continue to enforce rules it has already adopted except where inconsistent with this section.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.745
Single bed certification. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) The department may use a single bed certification process as outlined in rule to provide additional treatment capacity for a person suffering from a mental disorder for whom an evaluation and treatment bed is not available. The facility that is the proposed site of the single bed certification must be a facility that is willing and able to provide the person with timely and appropriate treatment either directly or by arrangement with other public or private agencies.
(2) A single bed certification must be specific to the patient receiving treatment.
(3) A designated crisis responder who submits an application for a single bed certification for treatment at a facility that is willing and able to provide timely and appropriate mental health treatment in good faith belief that the single bed certification is appropriate may presume that the single bed certification will be approved for the purpose of completing the detention process and responding to other emergency calls.
(4) The department may adopt rules implementing this section and continue to enforce rules it has already adopted except where inconsistent with this section.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.750
Report—Person meets detention criteria—Unavailable detention facilities. (Effective until April 1, 2018.)

(1) A designated mental health professional shall make a report to the department when he or she determines a person meets detention criteria under RCW 71.05.150, 71.05.153, 71.34.700, or 71.34.710 and there are not any beds available at an evaluation and treatment facility, the person has not been provisionally accepted for admission by a facility, and the person cannot be served on a single bed certification or less restrictive alternative. Starting at the time when the designated mental health professional determines a person meets detention criteria and the investigation has been completed, the designated mental health professional has twenty-four hours to submit a completed report to the department.
(2) The report required under subsection (1) of this section must contain at a minimum:
(a) The date and time that the investigation was completed;
(b) The identity of the responsible regional support network or behavioral health organization;
(c) The county in which the person met detention criteria;
(d) A list of facilities which refused to admit the person; and
(e) Identifying information for the person, including age or date of birth.
(3) The department shall develop a standardized reporting form or modify the current form used for single bed certifications for the report required under subsection (2) of this section and may require additional reporting elements as it determines are necessary or supportive. The department shall also determine the method for the transmission of the completed report from the designated mental health professional to the department.
(4) The department shall create quarterly reports displayed on its web site that summarize the information reported under subsection (2) of this section. At a minimum, the reports must display data by county and by month. The reports must also include the number of single bed certifications granted by category. The categories must include all of the reasons that the department recognizes for issuing a single bed certification, as identified in rule.
(5) The reports provided according to this section may not display "protected health information" as that term is used in the federal health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996, nor information contained in "mental health treatment records" as that term is used in chapter 70.02 RCW or elsewhere in state law, and must otherwise be compliant with state and federal privacy laws.
(6) For purposes of this section, the term "single bed certification" means a situation in which an adult on a seventy-two hour detention, fourteen-day commitment, ninety-day commitment, or one hundred eighty-day commitment is detained to a facility that is:
(a) Not certified as an inpatient evaluation and treatment facility; or
(b) A certified inpatient evaluation and treatment facility that is already at capacity.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.

71.05.750
Report—Person meets detention criteria—Unavailable detention facilities. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1) A designated crisis responder shall make a report to the department when he or she determines a person meets detention criteria under RCW 71.05.150, 71.05.153, 71.34.700, or 71.34.710 and there are not any beds available at an evaluation and treatment facility, the person has not been provisionally accepted for admission by a facility, and the person cannot be served on a single bed certification or less restrictive alternative. Starting at the time when the designated crisis responder determines a person meets detention criteria and the investigation has been completed, the designated crisis responder has twenty-four hours to submit a completed report to the department.
(2) The report required under subsection (1) of this section must contain at a minimum:
(a) The date and time that the investigation was completed;
(b) The identity of the responsible behavioral health organization;
(c) The county in which the person met detention criteria;
(d) A list of facilities which refused to admit the person; and
(e) Identifying information for the person, including age or date of birth.
(3) The department shall develop a standardized reporting form or modify the current form used for single bed certifications for the report required under subsection (2) of this section and may require additional reporting elements as it determines are necessary or supportive. The department shall also determine the method for the transmission of the completed report from the designated crisis responder to the department.
(4) The department shall create quarterly reports displayed on its web site that summarize the information reported under subsection (2) of this section. At a minimum, the reports must display data by county and by month. The reports must also include the number of single bed certifications granted by category. The categories must include all of the reasons that the department recognizes for issuing a single bed certification, as identified in rule.
(5) The reports provided according to this section may not display "protected health information" as that term is used in the federal health insurance portability and accountability act of 1996, nor information contained in "mental health treatment records" as that term is used in chapter 70.02 RCW or elsewhere in state law, and must otherwise be compliant with state and federal privacy laws.
(6) For purposes of this section, the term "single bed certification" means a situation in which an adult on a seventy-two hour detention, fourteen-day commitment, ninety-day commitment, or one hundred eighty-day commitment is detained to a facility that is:
(a) Not certified as an inpatient evaluation and treatment facility; or
(b) A certified inpatient evaluation and treatment facility that is already at capacity.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.755
Report—Unavailable detention facilities—Responsibility of regional support network or behavioral health organization—Corrective actions.

(1) The department shall promptly share reports it receives under RCW 71.05.750 with the responsible regional support network or behavioral health organization. The regional support network or behavioral health organization receiving this notification must attempt to engage the person in appropriate services for which the person is eligible and report back within seven days to the department.
(2) The department shall track and analyze reports submitted under RCW 71.05.750. The department must initiate corrective action when appropriate to ensure that each regional support network or behavioral health organization has implemented an adequate plan to provide evaluation and treatment services. Corrective actions may include remedies under RCW 71.24.330 and 43.20A.894, including requiring expenditure of reserve funds. An adequate plan may include development of less restrictive alternatives to involuntary commitment such as crisis triage, crisis diversion, voluntary treatment, or prevention programs reasonably calculated to reduce demand for evaluation and treatment under this chapter.
NOTES:
Effective date2015 c 269 §§ 1-9 and 11-13: See note following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.760
Designated crisis responders—Training—Transition process—Secure detoxification facility capacity. (Effective April 1, 2018.)

(1)(a) By April 1, 2018, the department, by rule, must combine the functions of a designated mental health professional and designated chemical dependency specialist by establishing a designated crisis responder who is authorized to conduct investigations, detain persons up to seventy-two hours to the proper facility, and carry out the other functions identified in this chapter and chapter 71.34 RCW. The behavioral health organizations shall provide training to the designated crisis responders as required by the department.
(b)(i) To qualify as a designated crisis responder, a person must have received chemical dependency training as determined by the department and be a:
(A) Psychiatrist, psychologist, psychiatric advanced registered nurse practitioner, or social worker;
(B) Person with a master's degree or further advanced degree in counseling or one of the social sciences from an accredited college or university and who have, in addition, at least two years of experience in direct treatment of persons with mental illness or emotional disturbance, such experience gained under the direction of a mental health professional;
(C) Person who meets the waiver criteria of RCW 71.24.260, which waiver was granted before 1986;
(D) Person who had an approved waiver to perform the duties of a mental health professional that was requested by the regional support network and granted by the department before July 1, 2001; or
(E) Person who has been granted an exception of the minimum requirements of a mental health professional by the department consistent with rules adopted by the secretary.
(ii) Training must include chemical dependency training specific to the duties of a designated crisis responder, including diagnosis of substance abuse and dependence and assessment of risk associated with substance use.
(c) The department must develop a transition process for any person who has been designated as a designated mental health professional or a designated chemical dependency specialist before April 1, 2018, to be converted to a designated crisis responder. The behavioral health organizations shall provide training, as required by the department, to persons converting to designated crisis responders, which must include both mental health and chemical dependency training applicable to the designated crisis responder role.
(2)(a) The department must ensure that at least one sixteen-bed secure detoxification facility is operational by April 1, 2018, and that at least two sixteen-bed secure detoxification facilities are operational by April 1, 2019.
(b) If, at any time during the implementation of secure detoxification facility capacity, federal funding becomes unavailable for federal match for services provided in secure detoxification facilities, then the department must cease any expansion of secure detoxification facilities until further direction is provided by the legislature.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: "(1) Sections 501, 503 through 532, and 701 of this act are necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health, or safety, or support of the state government and its existing public institutions, and take effect *April 1, 2016.
(2) Sections 201 through 210, 212, 214 through 224, 226 through 232, 234 through 237, 239 through 242, 244 through 267, 269, 271, 273, 274, 276, 278, 279, 281, 401 through 429, and 502 of this act take effect April 1, 2018.
(3) Sections 211, 213, 225, 233, 238, 243, 268, 270, 272, 275, 277, and 280 of this act take effect July 1, 2026." [ 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 § 803.]
*Reviser's note: 2016 1st sp.s. c 29 was signed by the governor on April 18, 2016.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.801
Persons with developmental disabilities—Service plans—Habilitation services.

When appropriate and subject to available funds, the treatment and training of a person with a developmental disability who is committed to the custody of the department or to a facility certified for ninety day treatment by the department for a further period of intensive treatment under RCW 71.05.320 must be provided in a program specifically reserved for the treatment and training of persons with developmental disabilities. A person so committed shall receive habilitation services pursuant to an individualized service plan specifically developed to treat the behavior which was the subject of the criminal proceedings. The treatment program shall be administered by developmental disabilities professionals and others trained specifically in the needs of persons with developmental disabilities. The department may limit admissions to this specialized program in order to ensure that expenditures for services do not exceed amounts appropriated by the legislature and allocated by the department for such services. The department may establish admission priorities in the event that the number of eligible persons exceeds the limits set by the department.
NOTES:
FindingsIntent2009 c 323: See note following RCW 71.05.320.



71.05.810
Integration evaluation. (Effective April 1, 2018, until August 1, 2023.)

(1) The Washington state institute for public policy shall evaluate the effect of the integration of the involuntary treatment systems for substance use disorders and mental health and make preliminary reports to appropriate committees of the legislature by December 1, 2020, and June 30, 2021, and a final report by June 30, 2023.
(2) The evaluation must include an assessment of whether the integrated system:
(a) Has increased efficiency of evaluation and treatment of persons involuntarily detained for substance use disorders;
(b) Is cost-effective, including impacts on health care, housing, employment, and criminal justice costs;
(c) Results in better outcomes for persons involuntarily detained;
(d) Increases the effectiveness of the crisis response system statewide;
(e) Has an impact on commitments based upon mental disorders;
(f) Has been sufficiently resourced with enough involuntary treatment beds, less restrictive alternative treatment options, and state funds to provide timely and appropriate treatment for all individuals interacting with the integrated involuntary treatment system; and
(g) Has diverted from the mental health involuntary treatment system a significant number of individuals whose risk results from substance abuse, including an estimate of the net savings from serving these clients into the appropriate substance abuse treatment system.
(3) This section expires August 1, 2023.
NOTES:
Effective dates2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See note following RCW 71.05.760.
Short titleRight of action2016 1st sp.s. c 29: See notes following RCW 71.05.010.



71.05.910
Construction—1973 1st ex.s. c 142.

Sections 6 through 63 of this 1973 amendatory act shall constitute a new chapter in Title 71 RCW, and shall be considered the successor to those sections of chapter 71.02 RCW repealed by this 1973 amendatory act.



71.05.920
Section headings not part of the law.

Section headings as used in sections 6 through 63 of this 1973 amendatory act shall not constitute any part of law.



71.05.930
Effective date—1973 1st ex.s. c 142.

This 1973 amendatory act shall take effect on January 1, 1974.



71.05.940
Equal application of 1989 c 420—Evaluation for developmental disability.

The provisions of chapter 420, Laws of 1989 shall apply equally to persons in the custody of the department on May 13, 1989, who were found by a court to be not guilty by reason of insanity or incompetent to stand trial, or who have been found to have committed acts constituting a felony pursuant to RCW 71.05.280(3) and present a substantial likelihood of repeating similar acts, and the secretary shall cause such persons to be evaluated to ascertain if such persons are developmentally disabled for placement in a program specifically reserved for the treatment and training of persons with developmental disabilities.
NOTES:
PurposeConstruction1999 c 13: See note following RCW 10.77.010.



71.05.950
Construction—Chapter applicable to state registered domestic partnerships—2009 c 521.

For the purposes of this chapter, the terms spouse, marriage, marital, husband, wife, widow, widower, next of kin, and family shall be interpreted as applying equally to state registered domestic partnerships or individuals in state registered domestic partnerships as well as to marital relationships and married persons, and references to dissolution of marriage shall apply equally to state registered domestic partnerships that have been terminated, dissolved, or invalidated, to the extent that such interpretation does not conflict with federal law. Where necessary to implement chapter 521, Laws of 2009, gender-specific terms such as husband and wife used in any statute, rule, or other law shall be construed to be gender neutral, and applicable to individuals in state registered domestic partnerships.